Archive for the 'COED news & upcoming events' Category

Welcoming Dr. Lynne Knobloch-Fedders to the COED Family

The Knobloch-Fedders Family

An undergraduate alumna of Marquette University, Dr. Lynne Knobloch-Fedders is returning to her Wisconsin roots this fall and joining the faculty of the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology department. We’d like to take a moment to introduce her so you can get to know her better!

COED: Tell us about yourself!

Lynne Knobloch-Fedders: My husband and I met at Marquette, and we are both proud undergraduate alumni. After receiving my Ph.D. from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, I served on the faculty at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, a clinical and academic institute which specializes in couple and family therapy, for 16 years. I am thrilled to be returning to Marquette, to join the academic community I came to cherish as an undergraduate.

My husband and I have three children, Kathryn (9), Carsten (6), and Sophia (4). They are very fun, but keep us very busy! In the free time I do have, I love gardening, playing tennis, swimming, and taking long walks.

Where did you grow up? Are you new to Milwaukee?

LKF: I’m a Wisconsin native (I grew up in Oshkosh, and my husband is from Sheboygan). We are delighted to return home to Wisconsin to be closer to friends and family. I love Milwaukee and can’t wait to explore the changes that have occurred in the city over the past few years. I’m also a huge fan of the Milwaukee Brewers and Green Bay Packers, and we are looking forward to attending Marquette basketball games as a family.

What is your favorite educational experience?

LKF: As an undergraduate at Marquette, I learned how to embrace the social justice mission of the Jesuit educational tradition. I am looking forward to contributing to that mission as a faculty member in the College of Education.

My faith is also very important to me. Marquette is where my Catholic identity was fully formed, and I am very pleased to be able to rejoin the campus faith community.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

LKF: I am looking forward to the opportunity to reconnect with the Marquette community, and meet students, faculty, and staff from around the university. I’d also like to build research collaborations across the university and within the greater Milwaukee community.

What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

LKF: I love Marquette. I am so proud to able to rejoin the Marquette community, and to be able to work alongside the many talented students, faculty, and staff of the College of Education.

Dr. Knobloch-Fedders will teach “Family Counseling,” “Research Methods,” “Intermediate Statistics,” along with “Evaluation and Measurement.” Want to know more about the College of Education? You can learn more about our new faculty and degree programs by visiting us today!

Introducing Dr. Karisse A. Callender

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The College of Education is pleased to introduce you to one of our three new faculty members for the 2017–2018 school year. Dr. Karisse A. Callender is an Assistant Professor in the Counselor Education Counseling Psychology department. She holds a Ph.D. in Counselor Education from Texas A&M University — Corpus Christi. We caught up with Dr. Callender to ask her some questions about her views on education, Milwaukee, and her favorite books!

 

 


I want to prepare my students with the foundation to go into their respective communities with knowledge to help them develop behaviors and skills that are holistic, and career-sustaining, as they work with their clients and colleagues.

Tell us a little more about yourself! Where did you grow up? What’s your favorite book?

Dr. Karisse Callender: I am from the beautiful island of Tobago, the smaller of the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. As a child, I loved reading and that hasn’t changed in my adult life. Two of my favorites for this year are The Compassionate Achiever by Christopher L. Kukk and The Prophet by Kahil Gibran. I don’t drink coffee but I love hot teas and usually drink several cups each day! My education began with an undergraduate degree in behavioral sciences (psychology with a sociology minor), a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling (concentration in alcohol and other drug abuse) and a doctoral degree in counselor education. I am a licensed professional counselor and substance abuse counselor, and I worked with adolescents, adults, couples, and families in both outpatient and residential settings with presenting issues related to mental health, substance use, and trauma.

How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

KC: I am new to the Milwaukee area and so far, I love the many activities I can enjoy outdoors and being in a vibrant city. Although it will take some time to adjust to a bigger city, I am excited to call Milwaukee my new home and look forward to creating many happy memories here. I would like to learn more about the culture and explore outdoor activities, community organizations, and anything that is local to Milwaukee and the surrounding areas.

Image Credit: Wikipedia Commons

What is your favorite educational experience?

KC: When I teach and I observe students struggling to understand the concepts in their textbook or from materials in class, my favorite thing to do is to draw from my clinical experience to provide them with a real-life example and interpretation of what they read. It’s amazing to see how their eyes light up when they finally experience the “aha!” moment. As a doctoral student, one of my favorite educational experiences was learning how to design, implement, and manage a fully functional online class and teach a module online.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

KC: I am excited to get into my research agenda and collaborate with students, colleagues and community organizations. I look forwarding to playing a role in bridging the researcher-practitioner gap as I learn about the needs within the community. I want to prepare my students with the foundation to go into their respective communities with knowledge to help them develop behaviors and skills that are holistic, and career-sustaining, as they work with their clients and colleagues.

What are your research interests?

KC: My research interests are grounded in three primary areas: trauma, addiction, and clinical supervision. I am interested in studying the effects and implications of trauma and addiction across the lifespan and interventions that are most appropriate for this population. As counselors and counselor educators we often supervise individuals at different stages of their professional development. I want to find out about specific supervision needs and interventions for students and counselors who may be in recovery, and those who work primarily with clients with trauma or addiction diagnoses.

Across my research agenda, my intention is to find out what works for whom, how it works, and under what circumstances. I’m also interested in discovering ways to bridge the researcher-practitioner gap through my teaching, research, leadership, and service.

What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

KC: The mission of Marquette resonates with me on a personal and professional level. I share the belief that through excellence in my work, faith in myself and others, and compassionate leadership and service, I can inspire and encourage others. The COED has a nurturing and caring environment which indicates that this is a place where I can flourish as part of the faculty and as an individual. I believe I am very fortunate to be part of Marquette University, the COED, and especially the CECP department.

Dr. Callender will teach “Group Counseling” along with “Human Growth and Development” this fall. Want to know more about the College of Education? You can learn more about our new faculty and degree programs by visiting us today!

Welcome Back, Dr. Terry Burant!


The College of Education is excited to have Dr. Theresa J. Burant return as our new Director of Teacher Education this year! Whether she’s teaching, swimming, or dancing to country music, Dr. Burant is loving her return to Milwaukee. Read on to learn more about one of our newest faculty members!

Tell us about yourself!

Terry Burant: I am a Milwaukee native, although I left for the west coast as soon as I earned my high school science teaching credentials. I started teaching and coaching swimming in southern California and taught in New Mexico, earned my Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in Tucson, then taught at the University of Wyoming. Although I am new to the position of Director of Teacher Education at Marquette, I’ve been teaching here off and on since 2001.

In addition to this amazing opportunity in the College of Education at Marquette, being in, around, and on water drew me back home to Milwaukee. I lifeguard, swim, and canoe as often as I can. I also walk and (sort of) run along Lake Michigan; even my workout studio is on the river in the 3rd ward. One of my favorite rituals every summer is swimming in Lake Superior near the Apostle Islands. My lifelong dream is to paddle the perimeter of Lake Superior; moving back to Wisconsin gets me a little closer to that dream!

I’m also a huge lover of Summerfest and music of many kinds; every summer I try to see how many times I can get to the fest. I only made it six times this summer; so, this gives me a goal for next year. One of the highlights this year was spending about five hours with my niece, in the pouring rain on opening night, to see Frankie Ballard (a country singer). Now that I live near my niece again, I’m sure I will be seeing more country shows with her as she’s my go-to country girl! I started taking her to concerts when she was 12, and she’s now 27; we’ve seen so many artists over the years. It’s impossible not to have a great time with Sarah next to me singing and dancing!

While it might not be fashionable to say this, I also love Wisconsin winters. After living in sunnier places for so long, I look forward to those long stretches of gray and damp days from November to March when I can wear my favorite coats, boots, hats, and scarves. Pretty sure you will find me back in the Polar Bear club on New Year’s Day. I’ve been told that my winter enthusiasm is a little annoying so I apologize in advance.

What is your favorite educational experience?

TB: In a formal school setting, the first one to come to mind is my Urban Studies class at Wauwatosa East a long time ago. Our teacher made the city and its issues come alive for us; his enthusiasm, humor, love for the city, and inquiry-based methods remain with me today. Another would be my doctoral program at the University of Arizona. I had the most helpful, wise, and caring committee members. This school experience felt like the best of kindergarten as I was free to design and explore topics and projects of interest to me, although, of course, the responsibility for learning was literally all on me!

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for the College of Education this academic year?

TB: We have so many; but, the new Core Curriculum gives us the perfect opportunity to rethink our programs and review where we’ve been and where we hope to go. We have such a talented, thoughtful, and passionate faculty and staff, and I look forward to our work together in the coming year.

I’m also excited to reconnect with alumni and make connections between and among them and our current students. I’ve always been happiest playing a connecting role, and I am driven to strengthen the Marquette College of Education’s presence in the city. I wholeheartedly believe in cura personalis and hope that this will be evident in my daily work.

Can you tell us about the time you talked to Taylor Swift?

TB: I will always be a Swiftie! It’s kind of a long story; but, while teaching chemistry, I was explaining the steps of a problem to my students and somehow the abbreviation for the steps brought T. Swift to mind. On the spot, I got a little carried away and dramatic in my explanation and created an acronym associated with her as an aid for my students’ memories. Over time, we started calling the problems “Taylor Swift” problems (although I was, of course, careful to make sure that my students understood what the problems were really about and were using the language of the discipline as they described their work). A few weeks later, Taylor was in town at a radio station and I called her up to tell her how my Marquette High sophomores had problems named after her in our class. With that signature T. Swift enthusiasm, she exclaimed, “that’s the best story ever!” and she gave us an autographed picture for our classroom. So yeah, I’ve been to see her three times in three different cities, and I look forward to whatever she’s cooking up next!


You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Off to New Adventures in Peru!

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For the first time, students and faculty from the College of Education will travel to Peru and gain experiences with working in school settings outside the United States. While in Peru, students will have the opportunity to work in two schools located in Lima, Peru and travel to the Sacred Valley. Students also will be completing two classes, Philosophy of Education (EDUC 4540) and Critical Inquiry into Contemporary Issues (EDUC 4240), before and after traveling to Peru.

When asked what they are most excited about, the students exclaimed their excitement for being in a new country and experiencing a new culture. “I am excited to observe in a classroom at Colegio Roosevelt and to learn about similarities and differences between their curriculum and classroom management compared to the schools that I have attended or have been placed at for a field placement,” expressed Amy Krzoska, currently a junior. Similarly, Sara Douvalakis, a junior currently, explained her excitement by stating, “I cannot wait to go hiking and sightseeing, but I am most looking forward to new foods.”

In traveling to a new country and experiencing a new culture, challenges do emerge. When asked what they thought would be the biggest challenge, the students replied as stepping out of their comfort zones as the biggest. However, these challenges will not stop the students from having a great time. “I hope to be able go overcome them and enjoy my time abroad,” explained Liz Rivas, a sophomore currently.

With all the excitement of traveling to a new country, it is important to see how this experience will impact oneself. Therefore, students were asked how their time in Peru will impact their future professions. Students, like Liz Rivas and Amy Krzoska, are excited to bring the knowledge gained in Peru to their future classrooms. “[The study abroad experience] will bring new ideas to me and give me the opportunity to incorporate these ideas with my own students,” said Liz Rivas. “ I will be exposed to the Peruvian school system and will learn what they do that could be beneficial to bring back to the United States in my future teaching,” stated Amy Krzoska. Other students are excited to learn from professors and other teachers. “I know I will gain so much knowledge from the professors who are going with us and all of the new friends we make in Peru,” explained Sara Douvalakis.

Study abroad is an amazing and influential experience for education students. To gain further insight, we asked Dr. Melissa Gibson, Assistant Professor and one of the faculty members traveling with students to Peru, on the importance of studying abroad for education students. The following is her response:

“ I think that the most significant is that it helps us expand our pedagogical imaginations. So often as teachers who work within bureaucratic systems and within policy schema and with limited time available, we tend to narrowly focus on “what is” rather than “what can be.” Getting out of the world with which we’re familiar can help us to imagine other possibilities for schooling — traveling, working, and studying abroad is a really powerful way to “make the familiar strange,” which is at the heart of social scientific thinking and particularly relevant for the courses we’re teaching. By visiting a variety of schools, we’ll see varied approaches to what education is and can be; by familiarizing ourselves with a whole new sociopolitical context, I also hope that our own context — its strangeness and its strengths — can come into sharper focus. For me personally, my own experiences abroad have been transformational — whether that be living and teaching in Mexico for several years, traveling throughout India as a Fulbright-Hays scholar, or engaging in a teacher exchange sponsored by the Japanese government. I hope that we can bring a bit of that perspective broadening to our COED students, with the ultimate aim of improving education for our K12 students here in Milwaukee.”

Students will be blogging during their time in Peru; you can hear more about their adventures in their own words

Week One of Building “S’More” Summer Readers

IMG_0048By Lily Vartanian – With the Dwyane Wade “Live to Dream” summer program underway, the tutors have been working to prepare and plan for their students each day now.

Monday, June 15, the first day of the program, was a busy day for both the new “summer campers” as well as the tutors, with a visit from Tragil Wade, Dwyane Wade’s sister, who is the Director of the Wade’s World Foundation. Throughout the two hours of the tutoring, Tragil was able to visit the classrooms of students on their first day, offering words of wisdom, interacting, and getting to know the kids. The students, in return, were very excited to have a visitor as well as a camera crew, both of which helped add to the excitement of their first day. Students really seemed to respond well to both Tragil’s presence and the notion that they should work hard to make her and Dwyane Wade proud.

Following the first tutoring session, Tragil said goodbye to the students as they departed on the bus. She was able to sit down with the tutors to further discuss her belief, hopes, and motivation for continuing to help struggling readers develop their literacy skills. She shared a bit about her experiences, getting her degree as an early childhood educator, as well as working as a primary-level teacher later on.

It was through her experiences teaching struggling readers and having a nephew who read below grade-level that Tragil was able to personally see the discrepancy between where students’ reading levels often times are, and where they should be. As tutors, this was a wonderful opportunity to hear just how important and dear to her heart this cause is to the Wade family, as well as the Wade’s World Foundation, which has made this program possible.

So far, tutoring has run smoothly, with the first of six weeks now complete. For my students and for many of the tutors, the first week always serves as a “test run,” since testing, attendance, and other adjustments need to be made before the program can begin in full-swing for week two. The first week is often the time to establish routines and procedures with students in the Hartman Center as well, which always requires time and practice.

Finding out about students’ interests, abilities, and building relationships with each of them has been key to the first week, so that we can better tailor lessons to the individual students. To hear from another tutor’s perspective, I asked Emily Carton to share her thoughts about the first week, and the progress she hopes to achieve with her students. She shared about her classroom, which is following a travel theme:

“Within the first couple days with a room theme of ‘Reading takes us places,’ we created reading passports to track our reading progress. We also talked about how reading can take us on an adventure as students colored their ‘carry on’ — the cover of a binder with their instructional materials. We are excited to see if we can work toward our class goal of 25 take-home books each!”

Each day, we hope to focus on certain literacy strategies and key instructional strategies to help the students create meaningful learning experiences. For example, students will work each day on a guided reading story, either reading by themselves, as a group, or with a partner. They will learn vocabulary words from these texts, which will be words that are added to each room’s “Word Wall.” Students will practice writing and fluency, which help with speaking, accuracy, and reading with expression. Lastly, students will have the opportunity each day to take books home to read, enjoy a class “read-aloud” book, as well as have a time for a mid-morning snack.

The days have been flying by so far! More updates on the “Live to Dream” summer program will be recorded here, so stay tuned to hear more about the tutors, readers, and the progress we are making in the Hartman Center in the coming weeks!

Marquette College of Education Recognizes Outstanding Teachers at WACTE

Marquette University College of Education recognized the professional excellence of two area teachers at an awards tea sponsored by the Wisconsin Association of Colleges of Teacher Education at the Concourse Hotel in Madison, WI on Sunday, April 12, 2015.

Mr. Vincent Gaa, Ed ’13, teacher at Casmir Pulaski High School in Milwaukee, was recognized with an Early Career Award for his commitment to working with urban youth. Christine Lemon, Ed ’03, teacher at Casmir Pulaski High School in Milwaukee, was recognized with a Mentor Award for her exemplary work with pre-service teachers.

In less than two years, in addition to teaching over 150 students per day, Gaa has designed and developed a popular Science Fiction elective rooted in social justice themes and aligned with Common Core State Standards; founded and supervised a Science Fiction Club at Pulaski; helped organize, mobilize and empower students to attend school board meetings and speak out on issues of concern (e.g. possible closing of Pulaski High School); led an effort and applied for an MPS implementation grant to establish a new aquaponics laboratory in an unused greenhouse at Pulaski that would promote sustainability, urban gardening, and interdisciplinary teaching and learning across the science, business, special education, and English departments at the school; and been an active member of Pulaski’s chapter of YES (Youth Empowered in the Struggle).

As English department chair, Lemon serves as a lead and mentor teacher to all new English faculty, modelling differentiation for diverse learners, co-teaching with special education staff, how to use Common Core State Standards in planning, and best practices in language arts and urban education. She is a Restorative Justice facilitator, a Night School credit recovery teacher, and has developed and implemented numerous service learning and community service projects with students. More recently at Marquette she adapted a specialized methods course for Teach for America intern English teachers and has developed and taught courses for the Upward Bound program.

This is the second year that the Wisconsin Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (WACTE) has sponsored the Early Career and Mentor Teaching Awards. This year, 42 teachers across the state were honored for their professional excellence.

WACTE is a professional organization composed of the Wisconsin institutions that prepare individuals for teacher licensure. Our teacher preparation programs offer diversity in size, focus and delivery, but all are designed to prepare quality teachers for Wisconsin’s schools. WACTE is an affiliate of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE).

A Toast to President Lovell and the Humanities

LovellFeatureBy Aubrey Murtha — I attended Dr. Lovell’s Inauguration this past Friday, and it was tremendous.

Not only did I leave looking forward to what the future holds for this great academic institution, but I also left with an overwhelming sense of pride in Marquette University, the most fantastic epicenter of intellectual growth and exploration on both sides of the Mississippi (a new phrase I have recently adopted to essentially say that MU is the greatest university in the country, no biases obviously).

For me, one of the highlights of the ceremony was when President Lovell announced the University’s new initiatives—specifically, the Center for Advancement of the Humanities. Thank you to the anonymous Marquette alumna who is making this project possible, and thank you, Dr. Lovell, for expressing your commitment to the humanities:

“Most importantly, I am fully committed to deepening and enriching the study of the humanities in the Jesuit tradition. With the foundation provided by this commitment, we will become a beacon for scholars both nationally and internationally to teach, research and exchange ideas alongside our talented students and highly respected faculty.”   — read more

As a secondary education and English major, I am deeply committed to the humanities.  I am excited by the prospect of research in the humanities occurring right here at Marquette.  I mean, we do tremendous research in science and engineering.  Why not enhance our studies of literature or anthropology?

So here’s to all of you history majors, theologians, word nerds, philosophes, and learned artists out there who contribute valuable work in the various fields of the humanities.  Marquette is finally toasting you!  You deserve it.


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