Archive for the 'Spotlight On…' Category

Getting to Know Dr. Jeffrey LaBelle



Dr. LaBelle enjoying his spring break in Maine as he visits his sister and brother-in-law.

The College of Education is excited to continue allowing students to better know its faculty and staff. Dr. Jeffrey LaBelle, S.J., is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Educational and Policy Leadership (EDPL) here in the College. We interviewed Dr. LaBelle so that our students can learn more about him!


Tell us about yourself! Where did you grow up?

I was born in Detroit, Michigan, but (moving with my family at age four) grew up mainly in Phoenix, Arizona, where I attended Catholic elementary and high schools. After graduation, I studied at the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, where I had a fantastic undergraduate education in the bilingual Elbert Covell College, from which I graduated in 1976 with majors in Spanish and ESL, with a single-subject teaching credential.

It sounds like you’ve been to many places! So how long have you been in Milwaukee?

I’ve lived in Milwaukee since 2007, except for last fall semester when I was on sabbatical in San Francisco.

What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

Back in 2007, I was motivated to accept a position in Marquette’s College of Education because of the warm welcome of the people here, the fine faculty and staff, as well as the enthusiastic preservice teachers. Our mission to serve urban education and to teach for social justice fits my personal philosophy quite well.

I’m glad that our mission fits well with you! What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

Currently, I look forward to another opportunity this year to teach and share the coordination of a faculty-led summer abroad program in Peru, “Education in the Americas.” I enjoy returning to Peru where I taught high school for three years in the mid-80s.

So what do you like to do when you are outside of the classroom?

Outside of teaching in the College of Education, I enjoy reading popular fiction, listening to classical music, and solving New York Times crossword puzzles, especially the Sunday one.

Currently I am reading the last of 26 novels by Donna Leon from her bestseller Commissario Guido Brunetti mysteries. I got hooked on these during my sabbatical in San Francisco when a few Jesuit friends recommended her writing. Working the crossword puzzles helps keep my mind sharpened, especially on Sunday mornings when I enjoy waking up a little more slowly (unless I have an early mass that day).

I suppose that words, language, and literature have always been and will always continue to be a large part of my life. Beyond that, what motivates me most is my love of God, my love for humanity, and my love for nature. I enjoy taking walks outdoors, especially in natural settings, no matter where I am.

You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Questioning the Dominant Narrative

books-441866_640By Lupe Serna

Many times, the curriculum is presented through the same dominant narrative. Although this allows for consistency across classrooms, it restricts history teaching to a single story. On the other hand, if we present students with different perspectives and prompt them to question dominant narratives, we open the doors to critical analysis and historical thinking. As a result, students learn how to draw their own conclusions to interpret history, rather than merely accepting the dominant narrative.

Teaching students to question narratives and approach history through different view points can lead to the discovery of new information and facts that are usually disclosed from the dominant narrative of that historical time period.

The Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, also known as the Chicano Movement, is usually briefly mentioned in the classroom. For the most part, students receive a very general understanding of the topic as a fight against discrimination of Hispanics, the fight for farm workers’ rights alongside Cesar Chavez, and the fight for the restoration of land after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

Of course, there are various ways to present this topic. A controversial textbook, “Mexican American Heritage,” describes the Chicano Movement as an attempt to create division. After reading a few excerpts from the book in the article above, I personally did not agree with that perspective. I can see why some might have thought of the movement as one that went against American culture. However, as a Mexican American myself, I think of the Chicano movement as more of a search for identity.

When discussing the Chicano movement, I think it is necessary to go beyond discussing what happened and asking why did it happen? Ultimately, it is the Mexican American people who felt the need to fight for their rights and education. Thus, the focus should be on their own experiences and struggles. Why did Mexican Americans at the time decide to fight for their civil rights? How were they feeling at the time that made them take action? What were they struggling with that led them to take part in a movement?

These questions seem to have straight forward answers: they faced discrimination, their rights as workers were violated, they had limited access to education, among other reasons. That’s as far as discussions in the classroom usually go. The deeper problem that is usually overlooked is the tie to the struggle of identity.

In the movie Selena, there is a scene where her father perfectly describes the struggle of being Mexican American as having to please two different cultures and meeting the expectations of both groups, leading to the feeling of not being good enough to belong to either group.

After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, many Mexicans were suddenly American. Mexican Americans struggled with this new identity, not completely Mexican but not completely American either. This article from a 1972 newspaper does a great job of explaining the identity crisis among Mexican Americans, claiming it as “One of the most pressing problems for a person of Mexican descent in the United States.” It goes on to talk about the discrimination that they face due to the color of their skin, the feelings of inferiority that they experience in the US, and the pressure to let go of their Mexican roots and customs.

Out of this identity crisis grew great pride in their mixed roots, taking on what came to be known as a Chicano identity. With that pride came awareness. Mexican Americans began to notice the manner in which they were treated differently, like is described in this poem. That awareness is what moved people to action and led to the voicing against injustices, the fight for civil rights and the fight for higher education, which was mostly led by student movements like the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán (MEChA).

Among some of the most well known activists of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement are Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, founders of the National Farm Workers Association, later known as the United Farm Workers union. The fight for farm workers’ rights is the most common story that is taught in regards to the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement.

A different side of the movement that is not usually included in the curriculum is the role of a secret FBI program, COINTELPRO, against activists. Left out of the curriculum and, as a result, not forming a part of students’ social studies knowledge is the use of repression and force against activists and radical groups in the sixties, especially the Black Movement.  This video talks more about the attacks against the Chicano Movement.

Most narratives included in the curriculum focus on the positive outcomes of historical topics. Students are not always exposed to the ugly parts of history that led to those victories. In the case of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, victories of activists like Cesar Chavez are commonly known, but left in the shadows are those who were silenced.

In the classroom, students should be encouraged to question both what is included in and what is left out of the dominant narrative. While they explore sources and different perspectives, they should question their credibility, their bias, their audience, their intention, and other factors that could influence the manner in which the topic is presented. This is a crucial step to incorporate into the classroom if we want students to learn how to sort out different perspectives to make their own interpretations of social studies.

Drawing from multiple primary sources when preparing for and teaching a lesson on any historical topic opens the doors to historical analysis for students. The sources above, along with the earlier video on COINTELPRO’s attacks on the Chicano Movement, present different information and perspectives on the Chicano Movement.

Social studies is about engaging students in critical thinking and analysis. A great way for them to partake in that is by questioning the narratives presented in the classroom, especially the dominant narrative. Participating in that questioning and inquiry leads to an expansion of students’ knowledge on historical topics because they learn to dig deeper and discover perspectives aside from the dominant narrative.

As teachers, that is what we are called to do — draw from multiple perspectives so that students can question the dominant narrative and make their own interpretations about the manner in which historical topics are presented.

Getting to Know Tina McNamara

The College of Education is excited to continue allowing students to better know its faculty and staff. Ms. Tina McNamara is the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Advising & Student Services here at the College of Education. We interviewed Ms. McNamara so that our students can learn more about her!

MU 1988 89

Where did you grow up? How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I grew up in Lewistown, Ohio, population 200! I moved to Milwaukee in the fall of 1989 to attend graduate school here at Marquette and definitely experienced a lot of culture shock during these first few months. Now that I’ve lived here so long, I can’t imagine living anywhere else. I met my husband here (he’s from Louisville, Kentucky), and we have two sons, Michael (16) and Stephen (22).

What is your favorite educational experience growing up?

I’ve had lots of great experiences, but probably the most influential experiences for me occurred during second and third grades. I was fortunate enough to have the same fabulous teacher for both years. She really instilled in me a love of learning and especially a love of reading. We have stayed in touch all these years – I always see her whenever I am back in Ohio visiting my family.

So what drew you to Marquette and the COED?

I initially chose MU for graduate school because I wanted to go somewhere that had the resources of a large school but still had a small school feel. Moving to a city was also appealing to me. The opportunity to return to MU after being gone for several years, and particularly to work with Education majors, was just too good to pass up. Teaching and teachers are very important to me. Several of my family members are teachers, and I taught in Alverno College’s Weekend College program for over 20 years. I always felt the work I did as an instructor at Alverno helped inform my work as an advisor here and vice versa.

It sounds like you really enjoy your time here at MU! What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

Every year is exciting! One of the things I enjoy most about my job is seeing how much our students grow and develop during their time here.

So what activities to you do when you are outside of the office?

When my boys were younger, I was very involved in activities at their grade school. I was even a Cub Scout leader for 10 years. Currently, I help out at my son’s high school, and I’m pretty involved at my Church. One hobby I particularly enjoy is singing – I have been a member of the Community Chorus for many years. I’m also an avid reader and movie-goer.

Tell us more about what these activities mean to you!

I think it’s important to try to find balance and explore a variety of interests. Singing, reading, going to movies, volunteering at school and Church, all help keep me sane!

You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Social Studies Embedded In Our Lives

10012162166_cde34d427e_bBy Lupe Serna

Growing up, my least favorite subject in school was always social studies. I didn’t enjoy it, it never stuck with me, I just knew I had to take it. I would take notes, study the material, take the test, and then eventually forget most of what I “learned.”

Of course, now I realize I must have never really learned it but, rather, memorized it.

The thing is, I always associated social studies with history, specifically, American history. That’s all it ever was to me. And, quite frankly, it was boring. I heard the same story over and over again each year. But even that wasn’t enough to learn it. You would think that after so many years of being taught the same parts of history something would stick with me. But that was not the case.

As a Spanish-speaking, Mexican immigrant, I could not relate to the material. I was not able to personally connect with, much less engage in, social studies class. Perhaps that’s why I always wrongly associated social studies with history, because I never saw myself reflected in the class content. As a result, I wasn’t able to take the material and apply it to my own life, I wasn’t able to make the necessary connection between the content and reality, I couldn’t partake in authentic intellectual work.

As a future educator, I now realize that that has been the traditional approach to teaching social studies for quite some time now. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be like that. We have the power to change it.

By taking different, non-traditional approaches to the teaching and practice of social studies, students’s retainment of material and ability to explain it highly increases.

If students feel connected to the material, if they see themselves reflected through the content and are fully engaged participants in their own learning, they are more likely to retain what they learn in the classroom and carry it with them to use those skills and strategies in the outside world.

In other words, authentic intellectual work of social studies is constructing knowledge and being able to transfer that understanding into different aspects or situations in our lives.

What exactly does this mean for the classroom?

Authentic intellectual work means that students do so much more than just learn the material or attain knowledge. It means students actually understandthe material. Not only that, they take it a step further than understanding and they, one, discover the content’s value beyond school and, two, take that disciplined inquiry and apply it in their lives.

But before I go on, it is important to clarify what social studies actually consists of.

There really is no set definition for social studies. Usually, when people hear the word social studies, they think of history, politics, geography, and international relations. At least, that’s what I always thought of.

Not many realize that social studies is so much more than just history. Social studies includes topics such as personal idenity, culture, race, language, religion, community involvement, social justice, civil plans and so much more. In a nutshell, social studies includes anything and everything relating to the human society and social relationships.

For the most part, we don’t really think about social studies as something we do. Surprisingly enough, we do in fact “do” social studies on a daily basis, at times when we least expect it. We do social studies by something as simple as interacting with members in our community, actively responding to current events or natural disasters, fundraising money for organizations or our own communities, acting or taking part in a school play that reenacts a moment in history, partaking in civil rallies demanding social justice, etc.

Take, for example, the many times throughout history when civilians have reacted to and spoken out against social injustices by taking to the streets to protest. It happened back during the Civil Rights Movement and it continues to happen today, the most recent example of nation-wide protests being those held to call for the protection of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In protests like these, participants “do” social studies in the following ways:

  1. Stay informed of current events and actively participate in their communities
  2. Use freedom of speech to stand up for what they believe in
  3. Are aware of and accept cultural differences and diversity
  4. Are informed about the effect of certain political decisions on the lives of others
  5. Interact with other individuals and groups
  6. Sympathize with and show their support for those directly affected

This video shows a recent and local protest on the streets of the Southside of Milwaukee, WI, where the community gathered to call for the protection of DACA.

Another misconception about social studies is that only adults take part in it. Youth’s involvement and role in social studies tends to go unnoticed because many are under the assumption that kids, who have not yet experienced much of life nor have attained much knowledge or wisdom, are not capable of contributing to society or having any sort of impact on the world.

However, quite the contrary is true. Kids can be just as powerful and impactful as adults. At times, they can have an even greater impact precisely because they are kids and as kids, they have a clearer, more innocent outlook on life.

Youth “do” social studies in more ways than imagined. A very common activity that children partake in but that is rarely recognized as “doing” social studies is discussion. When children have conversations with individuals or groups, they are, in one way or another, “doing” social studies. Participating in conversations is a great way for children to “do” social studies because it consists of taking an active role in social relationships. By interacting with others, hearing different perspectives, discussing their own view points, expressing their thoughts and feelings, and connecting with others’s stories and experiences, children are actively “doing” social studies.

This video is an example of 2nd-4th grade students “doing” social studies as they perform their own rendition of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton.” This is a great example of students “doing” social studies because it is evident that students took the material and interpreted in their own way to be able to perform it for an audience. They took history, listened to a different side that is usually not told, made it their own, and, to some extent, re-lived the past by literally putting themselves in the story and taking on different roles. Also, because they were able to fully engage with the material and presented it to an audience, their “doing” of social studies is a lot easier to assess in this situation. Their performance reflects their level of engagement and their investment with the material because in order to perform it well, they must first understand the message they must convey and incorporate props, movements, song, and emotion to do so.

Other examples of youth “doing” social studies are volunteering or doing community service, exploring other cultures and religions, witnessing social justice issues, interacting with people of different backgrounds, acknowledging the diversity within their own homes and the people around them, picking up garbage around their neighborhood, recycling in their homes, being considerate of the amount of water they use, fundraising money for organizations or humanitarian causes, and much more. A few methods of assessment for a non-traditional approach to social studies might be:

  1. Visual respresentations of past and/or current events with captions summarizing students’s explanation of what happened
  2. Visual representations of students’s reactions (physical and/or emotional) to particular stories or shared life experiences
  3. Written reflections about personal encounters or experiences out in the community
  4. A retelling of a story or conversation of students “doing” social studies outside of the classroom
  5. Written responses to the way in which current events were featured in news/media coverage and how it impacted them

A storymap is another example of “doing” social studies because it can serve as a timeline of events that in one way or another impacted an individual, or a group of individuals, while simultaneously telling a story and making it more personal. I created my own storymap to illustrate part of my family’s journey migrating from Mexico to the United States. By mapping this out, I got a better geographical understanding of the long journey that my grandparents, parents, and extended family members made by moving to the United States. It was very impactful because as I reflected on the difficulties, sacrifices, and social injustices that my family has experienced, I realized how strong that has made us and how it has shaped our character. At the same time, it also brought me joy and pride to remind myself of where I come from and what I’ve been through to be where I am today. If that isn’t authentic intellectual work of social studies itself, I don’t know what is.


Getting To Know Dr. William Henk

Dr HenkThe College of Education is thrilled to allow its students the opportunity to better know the faculty that keeps the college running. Dr. William (Bill) Henk is the dean of the College of Education, and we interviewed him so that our readers can learn more about our beloved Dean!

So what began your career in education? What is your favorite educational experience?

I think of my career in education as beginning on my very first day of kindergarten when I escaped out a window and ran home. From then on, my experiences as a student in elementary, junior high, and senior high school all helped shape who I have become as an educator. School children are the inspiration for my work.

As for my favorite educational experience, I loved my doctoral studies, because for three full years my job was to learn as much as I could about the field of literacy so that I could enter the professoriate fully prepared when I graduated.

Where did you grow up?

My roots can be traced to a blue-collar suburb of Pittsburgh, PA, that housed families of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Because my father was a janitor, my family lived modestly. Back then, I was the only kid whose mother had to work to make ends meet and whose family could not afford a car. My father commuted to work by public transportation nearly four hours per day. Although I didn’t live in poverty, I have some sense of what it means to “go without.”

My home was a loving and supportive one, and my parents had a profound effect on my life. Neither had the chance to further their own education, and they were determined that my sister and I had opportunities they never did. No question existed about the value placed on education in the Henk household. Grades of “B” required explaining.

So how long have you lived in Milwaukee? What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

I’ve lived in Milwaukee for 14 years. During my interview for Marquette, the faculty, staff, and administrators here were great, but it was the passion of the students I met that made coming to Marquette and the College of Education an irresistible prospect. I am honored to work at an outstanding university where students not only grow intellectually, but socially, ethically, emotionally, and spiritually. And besides valuing Marquette’s balance of teaching, research and service excellence, I am deeply indebted to the university for enriching my own spiritual growth.

I am excited for this upcoming academic year because I look forward to watching the extraordinary work of the College of Education unfold in its 10th anniversary year.

What do you engage in when you are outside of the office?

Most of all, I value spending time with my wife and daughter. I feel blessed to have a wonderful wife, Lisa, and a special 12 year-old daughter, Audrey, an accomplished dancer. I look forward to watching my daughter grow and develop, and I hope to see her graduate from Marquette in the class of 2027!

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On a personal note, playing the guitar and piano and writing original music have been long-time favorite pastimes for me. I just love learning more about music and getting more proficient at playing it. There is no end to the challenge. The inspiration for my musical passion is the multitude of amazing musicians who have moved me through their playing and singing. If you are interested in music, practice regularly. When you let your instrument sit for too long, then you have to do some tedious re-education of yourself each time.

When my limited time permits, I also enjoy reading and writing as well as exercising, photography and art. I try to stay in some semblance of shape by riding a stationary bike and working out on a Bowflex.

It sounds like athletics are also important to you.

I was a fine student, but I didn’t maintain the stellar grades of my sister, who graduated third in her high school class. I excelled in both baseball and basketball, even earning a college athletic scholarship. To this day, I credit sports with teaching me the values of goal setting, commitment, teamwork, sacrifice, hard work, and mental and emotional toughness.

As an educator, I believe that these values have served me well as a secondary English major, an elementary school reading specialist, a doctoral student, a professor, a department chair, a school director, and now a dean.

Is there anything else that you would like to tell the readers?

Once upon a time I was a pretty good athlete, and I played in some rock bands when I was a LOT younger.

And lastly, of course, I look forward to the continued success of the Marquette University College of Education.

You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Changing the Game: How Julia Magnasco Has Redefined What Teaching Looks Like Outside of the Classroom


Julia Magnasco, Education Director for First Stage

In March 2017, Marquette University’s College of Education launched its new undergraduate major and minor, Educational Studies. To highlight professionals working in the field, the college profiled Community Advisory Board Member Julia Magnasco of First Stage. For 30 years, First Stage has been transforming lives through theater. As one of the nation’s most acclaimed children’s theaters and the second-largest company in Milwaukee, First Stage runs academies for children and schools while also producing plays and musicals for the city’s entertainment.

Julia Magnasco serves as First Stage’s Education Director and is a member of the College of Education’s Educational Studies Community Advisory Board. A program for students interested in education but not the traditional licensure of a classroom teacher, Educational Studies will prepare graduates to work in non-profit organizations or informal learning institutions such as First Stage. We sat down with Julia to learn more about her day-to-day life both on and off the stage along with her insight into what this new program could mean for our students and Milwaukee.

I’m very excited for this new major. There is a great need for educators outside the normal realm, whether it be an artist in schools or in community centers.

College of Education (COED): Thank you, Julia, for joining us! Can you tell us a bit about First Stage, your role in the organization, and what your day looks like?

Julia Magnasco (JM): I feel very lucky because my world is play! I’m the Education Director for First Stage. We are a professional theater for young audiences in Milwaukee. We are the second-largest theater company in the state and one of the largest theaters for young audiences in the nation. We have this incredible commitment to our community, but also to the field of theater for young people and families.

At First Stage we say we have three pillars. We have our productions where we put on shows for young people and families from three years old all the way through high school. Something we do that is really unique is “age-appropriate” casting. We use young performers side by with professional actors. It’s important to us that when young people are watching a show that they see themselves and their stories. They’re able to do some social bridging and social bonding from the experience of seeing productions. Young people have to see themselves on stage. Part of that is the need to see someone their age playing that character.

JM5The second pillar is theater academy. Our motto is teaching life skills through stage skills. The real goal of all of our programming in the academy is to nurture those socio-emotional abilities, EQ skills.

Our third pillar is education. We go into schools and community centers throughout the Milwaukee area with different workshops and opportunities right within that setting. We primarily use a method of teaching called “arts integration.” The idea of arts integration — and in our case, it’s drama — is looking at the process and actually teaching the standards that go along with it. The arts, like every other curricular subject, has its own set of standards and skills that need to be learned, and they need to be taught appropriately with that. We’re teaching the drama process while simultaneously teaching another curricular or social subject.

COED: How many students do you interact with in the course of a year? How do you work with schools and with community organizations?

JM: We end up facilitating over 2500 workshops every school year in over 750 classrooms, so we reach about 20,000 students. We want our students and community to have three touchpoints and come into the First Stage family. You might enter from coming to see a show, you might enter from First Stage coming to your classroom, you might enter by taking an academy class, but the idea is the connection with all these different levels in First Stage.

COED: How do you think our new program can be effective for tomorrow’s educational landscape?

JM: How do you look at education in a nontraditional setting? We’re looking at what the educational mandates are, what the new, exciting initiatives are — how we connect with those and how we can be game-changers both in the local community and on a national level. I think now more than ever our classrooms are so diverse, and it is important as educators to acknowledge that. We need to be responsive in our teaching and use the proper tools, giving opportunities to acknowledge and embrace that diversity — and to take the next generation to that level.

I’m very excited for this new major. There is a great need for educators outside the normal realm, whether it be an artist in schools or in community centers. This opportunity for engaged conversations and art has great power; art has the power to change. K-12 education for me looks different from what I experienced to what my daughter is experiencing now. There’s not a lot of art specialization right now in education, but that does not mean art is not present. We’re looking at it from a different lens. There is an opportunity to partner with school, teachers, and other organizations to bring these experiences to our community.

Want to learn more about the College of Education and its undergraduate educator preparation programs? Visit us online today!


Introducing Dr. Karisse A. Callender

Photo Jan 20, 11 20 16 AM copy

The College of Education is pleased to introduce you to one of our three new faculty members for the 2017–2018 school year. Dr. Karisse A. Callender is an Assistant Professor in the Counselor Education Counseling Psychology department. She holds a Ph.D. in Counselor Education from Texas A&M University — Corpus Christi. We caught up with Dr. Callender to ask her some questions about her views on education, Milwaukee, and her favorite books!



I want to prepare my students with the foundation to go into their respective communities with knowledge to help them develop behaviors and skills that are holistic, and career-sustaining, as they work with their clients and colleagues.

Tell us a little more about yourself! Where did you grow up? What’s your favorite book?

Dr. Karisse Callender: I am from the beautiful island of Tobago, the smaller of the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. As a child, I loved reading and that hasn’t changed in my adult life. Two of my favorites for this year are The Compassionate Achiever by Christopher L. Kukk and The Prophet by Kahil Gibran. I don’t drink coffee but I love hot teas and usually drink several cups each day! My education began with an undergraduate degree in behavioral sciences (psychology with a sociology minor), a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling (concentration in alcohol and other drug abuse) and a doctoral degree in counselor education. I am a licensed professional counselor and substance abuse counselor, and I worked with adolescents, adults, couples, and families in both outpatient and residential settings with presenting issues related to mental health, substance use, and trauma.

How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

KC: I am new to the Milwaukee area and so far, I love the many activities I can enjoy outdoors and being in a vibrant city. Although it will take some time to adjust to a bigger city, I am excited to call Milwaukee my new home and look forward to creating many happy memories here. I would like to learn more about the culture and explore outdoor activities, community organizations, and anything that is local to Milwaukee and the surrounding areas.

Image Credit: Wikipedia Commons

What is your favorite educational experience?

KC: When I teach and I observe students struggling to understand the concepts in their textbook or from materials in class, my favorite thing to do is to draw from my clinical experience to provide them with a real-life example and interpretation of what they read. It’s amazing to see how their eyes light up when they finally experience the “aha!” moment. As a doctoral student, one of my favorite educational experiences was learning how to design, implement, and manage a fully functional online class and teach a module online.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

KC: I am excited to get into my research agenda and collaborate with students, colleagues and community organizations. I look forwarding to playing a role in bridging the researcher-practitioner gap as I learn about the needs within the community. I want to prepare my students with the foundation to go into their respective communities with knowledge to help them develop behaviors and skills that are holistic, and career-sustaining, as they work with their clients and colleagues.

What are your research interests?

KC: My research interests are grounded in three primary areas: trauma, addiction, and clinical supervision. I am interested in studying the effects and implications of trauma and addiction across the lifespan and interventions that are most appropriate for this population. As counselors and counselor educators we often supervise individuals at different stages of their professional development. I want to find out about specific supervision needs and interventions for students and counselors who may be in recovery, and those who work primarily with clients with trauma or addiction diagnoses.

Across my research agenda, my intention is to find out what works for whom, how it works, and under what circumstances. I’m also interested in discovering ways to bridge the researcher-practitioner gap through my teaching, research, leadership, and service.

What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

KC: The mission of Marquette resonates with me on a personal and professional level. I share the belief that through excellence in my work, faith in myself and others, and compassionate leadership and service, I can inspire and encourage others. The COED has a nurturing and caring environment which indicates that this is a place where I can flourish as part of the faculty and as an individual. I believe I am very fortunate to be part of Marquette University, the COED, and especially the CECP department.

Dr. Callender will teach “Group Counseling” along with “Human Growth and Development” this fall. Want to know more about the College of Education? You can learn more about our new faculty and degree programs by visiting us today!

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