Archive for the 'Tips and Tricks' Category

The Milwaukee Brewers Seek Positive Message Commercials to Strike Out Bullying

By Elizabeth Jorgensen

Objective: Create a commercial with a positive message to Strike Out Bullying. (Your commercial should be a positive message to raise awareness of bullying prevention at school, online or in the community.)

Eligibility: Teachers of students in grades 6-12 (students must be 13 or older) at a public or private school in Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Washington or Waukesha County, WI are eligible to participate.

Entry: The entry period began on Monday, January 23, 2017, at 3:00 pm CT and ends Friday, April 21, 2017, at 11:59 pm CT. Teachers must submit a link to their submission. Submissions must be on a publicly accessible online platform (YouTube, Instagram, Vimeo or some other public video platform), be in the English language and not exceed 2 minutes in length.

Judging criteria: The winning video will be selected by a panel of judges assembled by the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club. The videos will be judged on the conciseness, positivity, creativity and originality of the message raising awareness of bullying prevention at school, online, and in the community.

Prize: One video will be selected as the winner. The winner will receive a visit to his/her school for his/her class from Brewers players, coaches and/or alumni on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The students in winner’s class (grade) will also receive complimentary t-shirts and game tickets for the Brewers home game played at Miller Park on Friday, May 12, 2017, at 7:10 pm, and on-field recognition. One student from the winning video will throw out the ceremonial first pitch (if there is more than one student in the video, a name from the creative team will be drawn at the school visit the day before the game).

Rules:

  • The creative team appearing in the video can be one (1) to six (6) people, but no larger than a group of six (6). All students on the creative team must be in the same grade.
  • No one under the age of 13 may be in the video.
  • A teacher is allowed to submit more than one entry from the same grade at the same school. Each entry must have a different set of students in each video.
  • The video must not exceed 2 minutes in length.
  • Online entry only. No other method of entry will be accepted.

To find out more, check out this website.

 

Technology: Your Secret Weapon at Work!

images (2)By Stephanie Nicoletti

Last month I explained how when used correctly, technology can be your secret weapon. It can, and I am hoping to shed some light on that! I will explain how I used technology as my secret weapon in our first grade classroom.

Writer’s Workshop can be a tough time for young writers since their writing skills are still developing. When we started our “All About Writing” unit I wanted to make this as engaging as possible for my students, because in years past they have really struggled with this unit. Students were paired up on iPads and created nonfiction books on the app, BookCreator. Students selected topics they know a lot about, wrote down at least three details, and then began to create their All About Books. The students had to appropriately use various text features, correct details, and photos that were researched. This was very engaging for first-graders, crossed literacy and writing skills in one project, and finally gave students a sense of ownership for their learning. This is just one way I used technology as my secret weapon in our first grade classroom, with this mindset the learning opportunities are endless for our students!

Check out our published ebooks below!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLuAej1ssHL8x989YwttaTsmbWG6VVK303

 

The Wisconsin English Journal: A Call for Manuscripts

getting to the pointBy Elizabeth Jorgensen

The University of Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop says that “writing cannot be taught” but that “writers can be encouraged.” Whether or not literary creativity can be taught, certain skills can certainly be enhanced. Students can acquire insight into what constitutes effective or realistic description, style, narrative, characterization or use of language. They can also learn about voice, diction, plotting, setting and figures of speech as well as how to craft dialogue that gives clues to a character’s personality, social position, values and character.

In order to initiate this discussion, the Wisconsin English Journal invites you to share successful, inventive instruction, lessons, assignments and perspectives that teach facets of creative writing. For example,

  1. What’s the impact, possibility or pedagogy of teaching and assessing creative writing?
  2. How do you incorporate creative writing into teaching expository writing?
  3. How do you view creative writing in the greater context of literacy instruction?
  4. How do you implement technology or social media into this instruction?
  5. With the recent push toward STEAM education (emphasizing science, technology, engineering, arts and math), are there new roles creative writing might or must play in the rapidly changing landscape of K-12 and higher education?
  6. What do you see is creative writing’s role in the common core?
  7. How do you teach critical thinking through creative writing?
  8. How do you build, run and maintain successful writers’ workshops? What’s their purpose in your classroom?

Submission Guidelines

  1. In general, manuscripts range from shorter articles of 1,000 words to longer pieces of 5,000 words prepared following guidelines established in the publication manual of the American Psychological Association.
  2. Submit manuscripts to the editor, John Pruitt, and the guest editor, Liz Jorgensen, of Arrowhead High School, at wi.english.journal@com.
  3. First Drafts Requested by August 1.

 

When Senioritis Hits

books-927394_960_720By Elizabeth Jorgensen

As the high school seniors in my classroom fall ill with senioritis, complete with their own symptoms of tardies, apathy and excessive bathroom breaks, I remind myself I can keep students engaged. Although Urban Dictionary says “the only known cure is a phenomenon known as graduation,” I disagree. After over a decade of working with seniors, I rely on these three principles to keep seniors engaged:

Provide choices and purposeful classroom work. Allowing students autonomy and choice brings engagement. I encourage students to submit their writing to writers’ markets. I often present three different writers’ markets and allow the students to complete and submit a piece to the one that most resonates with them. I also bring in guest speakers—professional writers, current college students or college professors—and I’ve found this also excites and engages students.

Relate to them. I’m honest with my students about how I felt as a senior. I validate and listen to my students’ frustrations, anxieties and eagerness. I greet disappointment and fatigue with, “We’re in this together,” and “What can I do to help?” and (probably most importantly) with patience and a smile. I also connect what we’re learning to college and career readiness.

Allow privileges. My students want to be prepared for what’s next. To prepare students for the college environment, some classes are offered as hybrid (which allow seniors to choose when they want to work online and when they want to meet face-to-face). During study halls and work time, Arrowhead seniors are allowed to gather, socialize and collaborate in the commons. Privileges also remind my seniors (at the cusp of adulthood) that we trust and believe in their abilities.

As my seniors continue to suffer from senioritis, I remain hopeful: they can cure themselves of this temporary illness. And at semester’s end, I’m confident they will appreciate their time in Creative Writing, knowing they improved their ability to write, communicate and collaborate.

 

Technology in the Classroom: Your Secret Weapon!

snBy Stephanie Nicoletti

I recently just finished a class on educational technology. We discussed, learned, and even implemented different ways to use technology in the classroom. Through these discussions and reflection among staff, many often see educational technology as “just one more thing to do.” I am here to argue that it should not be that stressful to implement technology into the classroom, try to change your mindset and see technology as your secret weapon! One of my favorite quotes states, “Technology does not work when the technology is basically just worksheets on steroids.”  You won’t use technology for every, single, lesson, but if you can incotporate it, it will provide:

  • More engagement with students
  • Efficency in your classroom
  • New experiences students could not get anywhere else

I am not here to say technology is all students should be on at school, but when they create when using technology the opportunities are endless! Next month I will show off some of the things my first graders did with iPads that support this very argument and maybe give you some inspiration. Let’s just say writer’s workshop got much more engaging!

Book Club Provides Reprieve, Relaxation, Rejuvenation

images (2)By Elizabeth Jorgensen

Four years ago, as we enjoyed dinner, my best friend clutched her sauvignon blanc and said, “Kathy and Rachel and I are talking about forming a book club. Are you interested?”

Thinking of all the novels I wanted to read, but pushed aside for grading college essays, poems and exams, I answered, “Yes.” And with that, our group of four set out the rules: two books every two months. A rotation allowed each of us to select novels and host the event, complete with questions and discussion prompts. Some years, we met our two-books-every-two-months quota; other years, life presented challenges and we fell short. But we always start book club the same way: with an update on our lives. Then, while sharing a home-cooked meal or takeout pizza, we dive into the books and start our discussion.

We are support for each other and for our love of reading. We challenge each other and learn more about our lives and the way we enjoy literature. As the women in my book club birthed children, often a baby squirmed or slept, cradled in my arms. To our original four members, we’ve added two. And now, we rotate through the six of us, each member bringing a different viewpoint, preference and voice.

Before my book club, I read a handful of books a year, and they remained in my comfort zone. And rarely would they lead to discussion or dissection. But my book club has reminded me of the joy of reading—of connecting with a story, of experiencing another reality and of discussing themes of literature with my peers.  And now, when students or colleagues ask for book recommendations, I reference my much fuller repertoire:

 

2016-2017

The Sellout: A Novel by Paul Beatty

The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis

Among the Ten Thousand Things by Julia Pierpont

Fly Away by Kristin Hannah

The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls

 

2015-2016

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Every Fifteen Minutes by Lisa Scottoline.

Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 by Francine Prose

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah

Cemetery Girl by David Bell

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

After You by JoJo Moyes

 

2014-2015

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler

The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey

Defending Jacob by William Landay

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker

This is Where I leave You by Jonathan Tropper

The Winner by David Baldacci

The Light Between Oceans: A Novel by ML Stedman

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Every Fifteen Minutes by Lisa Scottoline

 

2013-2014

…and When She Was Good by Laura Lippman

The Silver Star by Jeannette Walls

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

Identical by Ellen Hopkins

Everything Begins and Ends at the Kentucky Club by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Tenth of December Stories by George Saunders

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

Where’d You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple

 

Writing Opportunities for Your Students

iStock_000005182627XSmall-Chapter-One

By Elizabeth Jorgensen

 Story Monsters Ink

  • About the publication: “Story Monsters Ink is a free, subscription-based magazine that gives parents and educators the latest news about award-winning and debut books, profiles on both renowned and newly published authors, upcoming book events, author presentations and more.”
  • About the contest: If you have a special teacher you’d like them to know about, email a letter to “Cristy@FiveStarPublications.com explaining why your teacher is the best, and we may choose him/her as our Teacher of the Month! It could be a principal, librarian, paraprofessional, etc. If your teacher is chosen, we will send him or her a Story Monster t-shirt and they will also get to choose a free book from our Little Five Star Bookstore. We will also print your letter along with a photo of you and your teacher in Story Monsters Ink!”
  • To find out more, go here.

Autism Society of Wisconsin

  • About the society: The Autism Society Affiliates in Wisconsin are hosting the 12th Annual Autism Essay Contest, a program designed to assist all students in gaining a deeper understanding of autism and how their peers with autism experience the world.
  • About this contest: “This essay contest is a wonderful opportunity to create an open dialogue about autism, how it affects students in your school and why celebrating differences is important. We hope that you will welcome this opportunity to promote understanding and acceptance of differences in your school.”
    • Divisions: Division 1: K-2nd grade; Division 2: 3rd-5th grade; Division 3: 6th-8th grade; Division 4: 9th-12th grade
    • Prizes: 1st Place Winners in each division will receive a $100 Amazon gift card; 2nd Place Winners in each division will receive a $75 Amazon gift card; 3rd Place Winners in each division will receive a $50 Amazon gift card.
      • All 1st place winners will be honored at and invited to the Family Reception at the Autism Society of Wisconsin’s 28th Annual Conference in Wisconsin Dells on Friday, April 28, 2017.
  • To find out more, go here.

Girls Right the World

  • About the writers’ market: “Girls Right the World is an international literary journal advocating for you, female-identified writers. We believe in the power of young women, sisterhood, and creativity through writing. The editors of this journal are students at Miss Hall’s School in Massachusetts.”
  • About this contest: “Girls Right the World is a literary journal inviting young female-identified writers and artists, ages 14 and up, to submit their work for consideration for the first issue. We believe that girls’ voices can and do transform the world for the better. We want to help expand girls’ creative platforms so that female-identified people from all races, religions, and sexual orientations can express themselves freely. We currently seek poetry, prose, short-stories, and lyric essays of any style and theme. We like powerful, female driven writing and work inspired by beautiful things in life. Writers keep the rights to their pieces, but we ask to have the right to first publish your works in North America. After publication, the rights would return to you. We publish annually. Send your best writing, in English or English translation, to girlsrighttheworld@gmail.com by April 1, 2017.”

To find out more, go here.


What is a Marquette Educator?

Follow us on Twitter

Archives