Archive Page 2

10th Anniversary Trivia: Week Eight

My Post (16)

In honor of our 10th anniversary, the College of Education will be running ten weeks of trivia. Submit your answers below* to be entered into our weekly drawing. Submissions can be made now through 5:00 pm on Friday. At the end of the ten weeks, all correct answers will be entered into a grand prize drawing. The more you play, the more chances to win!

Week 8: Who are the chairs of each department in the College of Education (Counselor Education Counseling Psychology and Educational Policy and Leadership)?

*unless directed otherwise

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Sarah Crosby

This fall, we’re running a series getting to know students from all our programs in the College of Education. This week, meet Sarah Crosby, a graduate student from the great state of Illinois. And, catch up with all our other students on the blog!

crosbyMy name is Sarah Crosby, and I have the privilege of being a first-year student in the Student Affairs in Higher Education (SAHE) program in the Educational Policy and Leadership department here at Marquette. My role at Marquette–besides that of a graduate student– is as a Graduate Assistant for the College of Education. As I was researching for graduate programs I knew after spending five years in Kansas completing my undergraduate work that I wanted to be closer to home. I am originally from Rockford Illinois,  but I’ve recently relocated to Milwaukee for my graduate degree. However, I would consider Wisconsin to be a central part of my life; for the last twenty years my family and I  have spent the majority of our time in Green Lake, Wisconsin. Besides spending time in Green Lake, my family and I are  huge K-State fans. My family plays a central role in my life, and I am so excited to be close to them again!  When I am not doing school work or my Graduate Assistantship, I love to spend time with my family, being outdoors, working out,  watching K- State sports, and watching old classic tv shows.

As I was researching graduate programs, I was looking for somewhere that was closer to home but — most importantly — had a mission of family and serving others in a holistic approach. Consequently, when I arrived on Marquette’s campus for SAHE’s interview day in February, I instantly felt the family feel that I was looking for, especially in the College of Education. I felt like the faculty and staff I intermingled with really cared about me as an individual and not just a number. That has continued to play out as I am now officially a Marquette student! With that being said, I am incredibly excited for the opportunities that the SAHE program and my  Graduate Assistantship will entail these next two years.

Interested in learning more about SAHE at Marquette? Check out our website for all the details; we’re now accepting applications for next year’s cohort!

 

 

Where Are Our Alumni? Catching Up With Thess Dobbs

In this #ThrowbackThursday post, we catch up with one of our alumni who participated in an undergraduate version of our Masters in STEM Teaching program, Thess Dobbs. Currently teaching at Milwaukee School of Languages, Thess was recently awarded the Edyth Sliffe Award for Distinguished Teaching in Middle School and High School. Read on to hear more about what she’s been doing since graduating!

thessI teach high school math at Milwaukee School of Languages (MSL). At MSL I also lead the math club, which I started in 2014. In this club, we work on more challenging math that goes above and beyond the standard curriculum. Our students have the opportunity to wrestle with challenging competition-level problems and receive guidance to help them build their skills. Through fundraising we make all activities free or low-cost for our students, and we are proud to make these opportunities, often reserved for privileged students at elite schools, accessible to our students. The racial disparities in the STEM fields begin with the inequities in our school systems, and the process to end those disparities must also start with our schools.

Originally, I am from Milwaukee and grew up with a lot of brothers and sisters. My dad is a professor, and both my parents placed a strong emphasis on learning. Being a big sister made me a natural teacher. The Noyce Program gave me more hands-on experience than the typical pre-service teacher has. It wasn’t until student teaching that I really had to learn how to manage a classroom, but the relationships built during my field placements helped me maintain my confidence during the hard times later on. Thanks to the amount of time spent in field placements, I also got a good sense of the school culture of a few different schools.

Even though we aren’t in touch as much as we used to be, I feel the bond still exists between the Noyce Scholars in my cohort. All the formative experiences we shared as undergraduates are not easily forgotten. One person who inspires me is my grandma, Leona Sherrod, who passed away three years ago. She taught in public school for eighteen years, and taught for eighteen more years in prisons’ adult education programs. Though she is gone now, I’m glad she got to see me become a teacher too.

Interested in learning more about how you can pursue your Masters Degree and Wisconsin Teaching Licensure in just fourteen months? Our Noyce Scholars graduate program is accepting applications through February of 2019!

Becoming a Social Studies Teacher

This post originally appeared on Dr. Gibson’s Medium page.

mg 1

“painting of man” by Aarón Blanco Tejedor on Unsplash

By Melissa Gibson

The other night, I had an anxiety dream. In it, I was conducting research at an international school on its approach to civic education (you know, part of what I do in real life). My host was a teacher I know well, with whom I’ve worked in Peru. But before I could get started, he said I needed to meet with the principal. I entered her office, where another social studies teacher was waiting; across from us, the principal sat at her large desk, her head slung down while she napped. Worst nightmare of a job interview EVER.

Eventually, the principal jolted awake and leered at both of us. Our college transcripts were in front of her. She inspected each, and then looked at us with disgust: “Why would I hire YOU, either of you, to teach social studies when you do not even have good survey history courses on your university transcript? How can you even pretend to be social studies teachers?!” The other woman, who was clearly interviewing for a teaching job at the school, began to explain how her high school offered a plethora of college-level survey courses, and so when she got to college, she was able to move into advanced history seminars. She showed off her flashy knowledge of dates and names, and then went down a wormhole about some 1800s Navy admiral she was obsessed with. She ended with a summary of her students’ AP scores for the past twenty years. The principal nodded, clearly assuaged.

Then she turned to me. “What about you, little miss interdisciplinary?”
I gulped. I began my usual explanation of what it means to have studied Women’s Studies as an undergraduate, the various social science lenses on the same questions. I showed her on my transcript the “surveys” of sociology, history, literature, political science, but how they were all focused on questions of gender. And as I explained what I had studied, I grew more animated in my explanations of how I study these topics. The principal seemed unimpressed.

Gathering steam, I tried to give a narrative of how I came to this place in my intellectual career: I talked about not seeing myself in the curriculum (or in my classmates) and seeking academic spaces that honored the questions I was asking as legitimate intellectual inquiry. I talked about questioning dominant narratives, and moving back and forth between the various disciplinary cannons and critical theorists and scholars. I talked about my discovery late in life of how thrilling history can be when it is more than a collection of dates and names. I may have shown her the syllabus to my methods courses. I definitely showed her the documentaries and podcasts and blogs that my students have written in my social studies classes.

Eventually, she relented, agreeing that while my training was non-traditional, I clearly knew how to ask questions and get students to do some work (there may have been a tirade about lazy millenials and the ills of technology). She looked about to nod off for a nap again (and I really wanted to ask a snide question about what work she did if she spent so much time napping), so I mustered the courage to ask permission to conduct my research, which she granted. The next thing I knew, the dream had morphed into a murder mystery complete with chupacabras, and instead of conducting research on civic education, I was helping high school students escape some murderous blob-ghost thing, which liked to strike during football games. Also, there were rickshaw rides and a lack of child care for my own children so…definitely an anxiety dream.

School is finally back in full swing here in Milwaukee, and we are hunkering down at Marquette to dig into the meat of our courses. And on the eve of these intellectual journeys, I guess my sub-conscious needed to pause to reflect on what it means to be a scholar of social studies education, especially when one isn’t a traditional social scientist or historian. I talked my own imposter syndrome down in the dream, as evidenced by the principal’s relent, but I woke up aware of that always present feeling of self-doubt. Which, believe it or not, is important for me to hold onto. Not because it’s a valid self-critique but because it reminds me of how my pre-service teachers may feel in my methods courses and in their placements—not quite the real deal. And that self-doubt can be paralyzing. Part of my job as their methods instructor is to help them see the multiple ways that we can become scholars of teaching, and that our most powerful intellectual tools are the questions we ask.

This publication, which we will add to throughout the school year, is a record of their journeys learning to ask good questions. Along the way, they will uncover resources, stories, places, and instruction that just may help you become a better social studies teacher, too—whether this is your first year teaching, or your fortieth.

This is social studies. Not a collection of dates and names, but a way of inquiring about the world. We hope you’ll join us on our journey.

10th Anniversary Trivia: Week Seven

My Post (16)

In honor of our 10th anniversary, the College of Education will be running ten weeks of trivia. Submit your answers below* to be entered into our weekly drawing. Submissions can be made now through 5:00 pm on Friday. At the end of the ten weeks, all correct answers will be entered into a grand prize drawing. The more you play, the more chances to win!

Week 7: where were YOU in 2008?

*unless directed otherwise

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Alli Bernard

We’re continuing our fall series getting to know our students with Alli Bernard this week. Read on to learn more about Alli’s journey to the College of Education!

alliMy name is Alli, and I am a senior at Marquette. I am studying secondary education and English language arts with a minor in Spanish. I grew up in Oak Park, Illinois, which is a suburb right outside Chicago. I have lived in Milwaukee for 4 years, while I have been a student here. I will most likely stay in the area when I graduate and teach in Milwaukee. I have a mom, dad, and a 14-year-old sister who just started high school. Fun fact, my family owns a bowling alley and restaurant in Wheaton, Illinois (it’s called Fox Bowl)!

My favorite educational experience was getting the opportunity to study abroad in Peru for a month in the summer of 2018*. While there, we took two courses (Philosophy of Education and Critical Inquiry), looking at education from a Peruvian standpoint and background. I think this experience really stretched my knowledge as a teacher and allowed me to experience how education is viewed in other cultures and countries. We were able to spend time in different classrooms as well, which was very valuable because we could see how they were similar and different from our classrooms in the United States. Plus, getting to hike Machu Picchu was pretty exciting!

I am extremely excited to student teach in the spring. I have been looking forward to it for a long time and cannot wait to fully immerse myself in teaching. I have had a few student teachers in my K-12 schooling, and I think it is so different from having the full-time classroom teacher. Everyone gets to learn from each other and build relationships. Although I am also a bit nervous, I am excited because it is the next step I have to take in order to be a full-time teacher (which is the goal). I am excited to ease my way into it and by the middle of the semester, be teaching full-time and handling everything classroom related. It puts me one step closer to my dream (cheesy, right?).

I was drawn to Marquette because of the College of Education. I loved how small it was, because I knew that it would be the best way to interact and get to know my fellow students and professors. I have always preferred smaller settings but knowing that my graduating class is only around 70 people (if even that) is what sealed the deal for me. I also liked that we got out into the Milwaukee community from the very first education class. It helped solidify that I did want to be an English teacher and that I believed I was in the right field. I also liked that it was in a city with an urban setting, because it is something that I have not gotten to experience as much and therefore was intrigued by it.

My inspiration stems from my many amazing elementary school teachers who showed such a love for their students and their work. A special shout-out to my first-grade teacher Ms. Karr, who was probably the initial inspiration for me wanting to teach. I learned so much in that class and had such a strong relationship with her. I want every class of mine to feel as loved and intelligent as I felt every day in her classroom. I am also constantly inspired by the students I have had. Their creativity, strength, and intelligence is what brings me back time and time again. Their desire to learn and willingness to try new things inspires me to be the best teacher I can be to help them grow and achieve their goals.

If this program has taught me anything outside of classroom and teaching techniques, it is that teachers are some of the strongest, most resilient, and necessary people in society. Appreciate all the teachers and educators in your life. They deal with so much and do so much outside of the classroom that people are not even aware of. Teaching is so important and the work that is done truly changes lives. I do not know where I would be today if not for all the amazing teachers I had throughout my schooling.

*Want to learn more about our study abroad trip to Peru this summer? Check out Dr. Gibson’s FAQ’s to see if this is the program for you!

 

Changing Climate: Counselors Getting Crafty!

By Sabrina Bartels

At the start of this school year, the Student Services department decided to help “beautify” our building. Here are some fun things we did to help our school climate!

  1. “Be the nice kid” quote. This was one of the most difficult things we did, but it was definitely worth it. We started by purchasing white paint and painting over a small section of the brick wall. We then projected a picture of the quote on the wall and traced the lettering, before finishing off the words with a couple coats of paint. It was finicky and stressful, but we’ve gotten tons of compliments on it. If you’re thinking of adding this quote to your school, we recommend picking up a variety of brushes to accommodate the different fonts. Also, this is a team activity – all the painting can get very tedious for just one person! Be the nice kid
  2. Drake bulletin board. Our students love this one (and also use it as an excuse to sing the song “Hey Keke.”) We saw a bulletin board on Facebook that used the quote, so we adjusted it a little to fit our school and added our own picture of Drake. We hope that it encourages our students to start thinking about their post-secondary education paths. It’s also a fun way to incorporate a little pop culture into school! Bulletin Board
  3. And speaking of education paths … we added a bulletin board outside of Student Services so we could post our own educational paths. Our students love seeing where all of us went to school! We’ve also used our new bulletin board to post inspirational quotes for our students to read. Educational PathwaysEducational PathStudent Services board
  4. Inside Out bulletin board. We also created a bulletin board that offers students a gentle reminder about what we do in Student Services. So often, we have students who don’t know what our roles are, or what they can talk to us about. Inside Out
  5. Pennants. In September, we sent out emails to (almost) all of the colleges and universities in Wisconsin, asking for pennants and any “swag” the colleges had to promote their school. The responses we got were overwhelming! Around 15 schools (Marquette included!) not only sent us pennants, but were super generous in sending us t-shirts, temporary tattoos, stickers/decals, water bottles, and more! Thanks to their kindness, we are able to start discussing post-secondary education right now with our students. We wanted to hang them over the bulletin board outside our office, but are trying to find something better than duct tape to hold them up.

What is a Marquette Educator?

Follow us on Twitter

Archives