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Adventures in Graduate School

This summer, the College of Education is hosting four students in the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP). The Counselor Education Counseling Psychology Department’s (CECP)Dr. Jennifer Cook has been working with these students along with a number of graduate students.

Students enrolled in the HCOP program are from economically disadvantaged backgrounds and high schools; they are first-generation college students. Part of a federal grant through the Department of Health and Human Services, Marquette University’s HCOP program began in the School of Dentistry and the Department of Physical Therapy. Since 1996, the School of Dentistry, College of Health Sciences and Department of Physical Therapy have been working together. More than 900 students have graduated from the University’s HCOP programs since its inception. While across campus there is an emphasis on both high school and college-aged students, CECP is working closely with students interested in obtaining a Master’s Degree.

The four students who are participating in CECP’s Clinical Mental Health strand of the HCOP program are recent college graduates and rising seniors considering graduate school. There is no fee during the summer session; students receive a stipend to cover room and board while also offsetting the cost of any lost wages from seasonal employment. As they explore their interests in the mental health field, students will gain hands-on counseling skills training, establish relationships with faculty and graduate students, and gain exposure to the expectations of a graduate program in clinical mental health counseling.

Dr. Cook is focused on trying to prepare them for the graduate school environment, helping them to deal with basic skills so they can deal with the emotional stress that may come. She has created an “Intro to Grad School” course where the students focus on APA style writing, etiquette and how to present themselves, and exposure to Raynor Library along with how to use its resources.

In addition, CECP graduate students are learning along with the HCOP students in the College. Elizabeth Tinsley, a doctoral student, is one of the teachers in the program. When asked how she has changed and been affected by this summer’s experiences, she said: “This has been such a fun experience! They [the HCOP students] are inquisitive and invested, which has been so fun to watch in action as they explore Marquette and challenge themselves to push through uncomfortable situations. I have really enjoyed being a part of their journey and hope to seem them thriving as future Marquette alumni and colleagues!” This combination of current and prospective students’ growth has morphed the summer’s program into a deeper learning experience for all involved.


Want to learn more about the College of Education? Visit us online for more information about our graduate programs in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology!

Dreaming of Summer Reading


The 2017 “Dwyane Wade ‘Live to Dream’ Summer Reading Program” in the Hartman Literacy and Learning Center wrapped up its third session just last week! Over the course of five weeks, 52 students from Bruce Guadalupe Community School, St. Anthony School, Christ St. Peter Lutheran School, Highland Community School, Immanuel Lutheran School, and St. Thomas Aquinas Academy came to the College of Education for instruction in reading and writing.

Children were taught by recent Education alumni (also known as Wade Coaches): Gillian Armstrong, Allie Donnici, Juliena Herriz, Lexie Liber, Katherine Mullahy, Gabby Park, Zachery Richards, Clarissa Shields, Alicia Siggens, Taylor M. Smith, Kimberly Vogler, and Emily Wulfkuhle. Sessions were held Monday through Thursday. While the children were given 60 hours of instruction by our Wade Coaches, the teachers also received 40 hours of professional development by the Director of the Hartman Center, Dr. Kathleen Clark, and local teachers with expertise in reading and writing.

One of these professional learning topics was using data to inform instruction for reading comprehension. Rigorous goals were set while daily data was collected and graphed using a digital data wall. Carolyn Curley (Grad ‘12) oversaw this portion. Professional development around writing was facilitated by Christine Reinders (Grad ‘11). Throughout the summer, educators participated in ongoing professional learning (PL) in the area of writing.

Designed to grow educators’ knowledge of Writing Workshop, the group worked on a curricular narrative writing unit titled, Small Moments. The Wade Coaches spent time learning the “why” behind each component of a writing workshop and developed an in-depth understanding of the curriculum. Additionally, educators spent ample time analyzing student writing and developing targeted teaching points to touch upon during the daily conferring process. By identifying various craft techniques utilized in high quality children’s literature and designing lessons to help students develop the same writing moves in their own work, the educators honed their teaching skills. As a result, these twelve teachers will head back into the academic year with new tools in their arsenals.

All of the Wade Coaches were supervised by a member of the Professional Development team (including Clark, Curley, Reinders, Kristin Koepke (Ed ‘99), Ali Fregoso (Ed ‘95), and Kathleen O’Dell.


Want to learn more about the work of the Hartman Center? Visit the College of Education for more information about our academic year programming and the Dwyane Wade Live to Dream Summer Reading Program!

Welcome Back, Dr. Terry Burant!


The College of Education is excited to have Dr. Theresa J. Burant return as our new Director of Teacher Education this year! Whether she’s teaching, swimming, or dancing to country music, Dr. Burant is loving her return to Milwaukee. Read on to learn more about one of our newest faculty members!

Tell us about yourself!

Terry Burant: I am a Milwaukee native, although I left for the west coast as soon as I earned my high school science teaching credentials. I started teaching and coaching swimming in southern California and taught in New Mexico, earned my Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in Tucson, then taught at the University of Wyoming. Although I am new to the position of Director of Teacher Education at Marquette, I’ve been teaching here off and on since 2001.

In addition to this amazing opportunity in the College of Education at Marquette, being in, around, and on water drew me back home to Milwaukee. I lifeguard, swim, and canoe as often as I can. I also walk and (sort of) run along Lake Michigan; even my workout studio is on the river in the 3rd ward. One of my favorite rituals every summer is swimming in Lake Superior near the Apostle Islands. My lifelong dream is to paddle the perimeter of Lake Superior; moving back to Wisconsin gets me a little closer to that dream!

I’m also a huge lover of Summerfest and music of many kinds; every summer I try to see how many times I can get to the fest. I only made it six times this summer; so, this gives me a goal for next year. One of the highlights this year was spending about five hours with my niece, in the pouring rain on opening night, to see Frankie Ballard (a country singer). Now that I live near my niece again, I’m sure I will be seeing more country shows with her as she’s my go-to country girl! I started taking her to concerts when she was 12, and she’s now 27; we’ve seen so many artists over the years. It’s impossible not to have a great time with Sarah next to me singing and dancing!

While it might not be fashionable to say this, I also love Wisconsin winters. After living in sunnier places for so long, I look forward to those long stretches of gray and damp days from November to March when I can wear my favorite coats, boots, hats, and scarves. Pretty sure you will find me back in the Polar Bear club on New Year’s Day. I’ve been told that my winter enthusiasm is a little annoying so I apologize in advance.

What is your favorite educational experience?

TB: In a formal school setting, the first one to come to mind is my Urban Studies class at Wauwatosa East a long time ago. Our teacher made the city and its issues come alive for us; his enthusiasm, humor, love for the city, and inquiry-based methods remain with me today. Another would be my doctoral program at the University of Arizona. I had the most helpful, wise, and caring committee members. This school experience felt like the best of kindergarten as I was free to design and explore topics and projects of interest to me, although, of course, the responsibility for learning was literally all on me!

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for the College of Education this academic year?

TB: We have so many; but, the new Core Curriculum gives us the perfect opportunity to rethink our programs and review where we’ve been and where we hope to go. We have such a talented, thoughtful, and passionate faculty and staff, and I look forward to our work together in the coming year.

I’m also excited to reconnect with alumni and make connections between and among them and our current students. I’ve always been happiest playing a connecting role, and I am driven to strengthen the Marquette College of Education’s presence in the city. I wholeheartedly believe in cura personalis and hope that this will be evident in my daily work.

Can you tell us about the time you talked to Taylor Swift?

TB: I will always be a Swiftie! It’s kind of a long story; but, while teaching chemistry, I was explaining the steps of a problem to my students and somehow the abbreviation for the steps brought T. Swift to mind. On the spot, I got a little carried away and dramatic in my explanation and created an acronym associated with her as an aid for my students’ memories. Over time, we started calling the problems “Taylor Swift” problems (although I was, of course, careful to make sure that my students understood what the problems were really about and were using the language of the discipline as they described their work). A few weeks later, Taylor was in town at a radio station and I called her up to tell her how my Marquette High sophomores had problems named after her in our class. With that signature T. Swift enthusiasm, she exclaimed, “that’s the best story ever!” and she gave us an autographed picture for our classroom. So yeah, I’ve been to see her three times in three different cities, and I look forward to whatever she’s cooking up next!


You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Year One: Complete

Denali_Mt_McKinley

By Danny Smith

Waqaa!

So I feel as if I start all of these saying how much better I’ll be about posting … blah blah blah…well, I don’t have to do that because it is summer and I am back to living the same boring life you all lead! I have been done for about a month now though, and have been back in the lower 48 for a few weeks. I have been sitting here wondering what I would write about and how I should write for the last few weeks. I think that this post will again be reflective, but before I do that, I want to list all of the new things I have tried or done in the past year:

New Foods Tried:
1. Akutaq
2. moose (dried, sticks, stew)
3. muskox (stew, chunks)
4. fish, dried (halibut, smelt, pike, whitefish,salmon, probably a ton more)
5. fresh and wild berries (cranberry, blueberry, salmonberry, blackberry)
6. seal oil
7. seal
8. shelf-stored milk
9. bird (duck, crane, goose, ptarmigan)
10. and the most important from an Alaskan’s P.O.V.: Tillamook Cheddar Cheese

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New Things Attempted:
1. halibut fishing (proceeded to give to an elder at fish camp)
2. camping
3. salmon drifting (then used that salmon as bait for halibut)
4. wearing waders
5. holding a rifle
6. maqii (steam bath)
7. teaching by myself
8. running a student government
9. fundraising for a senior trip (despite it not working out)
10. trick-or-treating as an adult and walking into homes instead of knocking
11. speak a new language (Yugtun)
12. waking up at 6AM to fish alone before school
13. living without wifi at home
14. water conservation
15. -60 temperatures
16. seal skin/fur hat (never knew that fur was more than just for style)
17. SIOP lesson plans
18. Word Wall
19. casual conversations with students about firearms…
20. hauling water
21. riding in a sled of mail being pulled by a snowmachine over a melting river
22. riding on the back of a snowmachine
23. calling snowmobiles snowmachines
24. raising my eyebrows instead of saying ‘yes’
25. Iqmiik (aka black bull, or the native chewing tobacco)
26. flying to district trainings
27. not going through TSA to fly
28. Amazon Prime taking 2 weeks to deliver
29. paying $100 for a couple things at the store
30. boardwalks instead of roads

There are a ton more things I could add, but cannot think of at the moment, but there they are: 40 new experiences in the course of a year. As far as reflecting back goes, I’ve realized while writing this post that those lists kind of summarize my experience. I’d love to sit here and reflect on teaching practices and such, but that would get quite boring for the majority of you. As far as teaching goes, though, I will be spending the month of July working on lessons and such — many of which I have to just completely abandon and re-make due to how poorly designed they were. I think knowing our curriculum now and knowing my students and how they learn as individuals will benefit me tremendously going into next year.

As for my plans on staying or leaving is concerned, I have not made a decision on that. This upcoming year will definitely be the determining factor. My plan at the moment though is to be present (elders will tell the younger community members this often: to just be present in the moment and in my words, observe and absorb) and take things as they come, and then evaluate at winter break.

As far as this blog goes, I will probably keep it going throughout next year as well based on how popular it was among you all this past year. However, I am going to be realistic and not claim to have a post every week or every other week. I WILL try to keep it up once a month, or at the bare minimum bi-monthly.

I hope you have all enjoyed this year with me and have a great summer!

 

A Connected Summer

relaxing-1680432_1280By Stephanie Nicoletti

As I sit here on my patio, I am thinking, “what in the world should I write about this week– it is summer and I haven’t seen students in almost two months!” Then it dawns on me: no, I have not seen my students in almost two months, but I have connected with them this summer. In the beginning months of summer my little buddy who could not quite leave school on the last day contacted me through his mother’s email (she told me that last day that might happen). Also, our school uses the student portfolio app “Seesaw.” I decided that we could make it a “Seesaw Summer.” I will send parents any work or fun activities they may want to do throughout the summer, and they can upload it to the app. Another great way to stay connected to students over the summer!

Just this past week it was my birthday. While I was getting many birthday wishes from various friends and family members, I happened to open my school email and see an email from a parent. The email was wishing me a happy birthday and was signed from her daughter, whom I had this past year. And finally, during the summer one of my colleagues was calling me, I answered and she said “Miss Nicoletti? Are you busy? I am here with someone VERY special that would just love to talk to you.” Again, she ran into another one of my students at the pool who was dying to call her first grade teacher.

Now I am not writing this post to just tell these stories, but to again stress that while we may be relaxing and enjoying ourselves over the summer and various break, our students are thinking of us, and some are even counting down the days to come back to school. I am only going into my fourth year of teaching, but I have never been in contact with so many of my students before in one summer. I am so excited to see them shine in second grade. I am forever grateful for the relationships I built with them in first grade that allowed them to feel comfortable enough to connect with me over the summer. If you want to do something “perfect” next school year, make it building relationships.

Almost a Huge Hypocrite

—By Claudia Felske

Almost a Huge Hypocrite.

That’s me. Well, it was almost me.  

After reading a recent New York Times article on the notion of “smart failure,” I was ready to start next school year by giving each of my students a  “Failure Certificate.” After all, if it’s good enough for Smith College students, it’s good enough for my students. I had learned that these days, students at Smith, receive a  “Certificate of Failure” which reads:

“You are hereby authorized to screw up, bomb or fail at one or more relationships, hookups, friendships, texts, exams, extracurriculars or any other choices associated with college … and still be a totally worthy, utterly excellent human.”

How great would that be for my students? What a relief it would be, I reasoned, for these high-strung scholars, many with 4 or 5 AP classes and as many extra curricular activities on their docket—to receive permission to fail. “Brilliant!” I thought…until I gave it some more thought.

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What’s the snag? Doesn’t it make perfect sense? All the en vogue educational experts these days (Carol Dweck’s Mindset research and Angela Duckworth’s work on Grit) seem to be quantifying this wisdom, wisdom which common sense has long purported, namely that we necessarily learn and grow from failure. In order to grow, we must traverse our comfort zones, which often entails failing in order to acquire the kind of experience and first-hand wisdom that ultimately breeds success. We know this.

So then, what’s the problem? Why won’t I be handing out “Certificates of Failure” this fall?

Because the whole thing reeks of hypocrisy. Would Smith, Harvard, and Stanford students have been accepted into these prestigious schools had they lived by this motto? Would they be Ivy Leaguers today had their parents encouraged them to fail? To experiment? To disregard points and grades and test scores in favor of learning?

Is it the very institutions which have perpetuated the need for perfection the ones now hypocritically offering bandaids and ice cream cones to their bleeding victims?

The simple answer: yes. The only reason the solution of embracing failure is needed is because we, as educators, created the problem in the first place. The need to teach the value of failure exists precisely because we have created a high-stakes, grade-obsessed, avoid-failure-at-all-costs educational system to which a student stroll through platitude park is not the panacea.  

It should be no surprise that the institutions leading the charge to embrace failure (Smith, Harvard, Stanford, Princeton) are the most competitive universities around. The perfectionism, elitism, and cajolery required for acceptance into these schools are precisely the catalysts for the anxiety, depression, stress, and suicide rates which have necessitated the “fail up” movement.

Is it any wonder that it was Harvard and Stanford faculty who coined the term “failure deprived” to describe the students dotting their campuses “students (who) seemed unable to cope with simple struggles.” Through observing their students, they recognized the need to encourage productive failure, a need which arose directly from the game their students were forced to play in order to receive their highly-coveted acceptance letters.

More than a bit of hypocrisy here.

I was having tea with a parent the other day, the mother of lovely and extremely high achieving students. The expectations in their family are very high and very clear. She, too, had read the New York Times article and was pondering giving her children a copy of the “Certificate of Failure.”

And again, I couldn’t help but spot the thick coat of hypocrisy in her words. As a parent who expected 4.0’s, could a “Certificate of Failure,” no matter how well-intended, be given in good faith? As an AP English teacher, could I give my students a “Certificate of Failure” knowing that the reason they are in AP English in the first place is because they (and their families) do not subscribe to a “fail to learn” mentality, and that doing so would have likely precluded them from enrollment?

How many of us share our children’s failures as oft as their successes?

How many of us encourage our children to be artists…for a living?

How many of us encourage our children to learn…without grades in mind?

How many of us encourage our students to do what they love even there’s no spot for it on a resume?

The “fail gracefully” sentiment may be bantered about by administrators, teachers, and parents when they happen across an article in the New York Times, but its opposite is clearly expected on a day-to-day basis.

Perpetuating the “fail well” philosophy is sheer hypocrisy. It’s merely handing out band-aids and ice cream cones while ignoring the perpetual bleeding.

Here’s the real message: Maintain your 4.0, do well on ACT and SAT’s (or take them over repeatedly), do what it takes to get into a good college, land a good job, have a responsible life that ensures your economic stability and reflects well upon the rest of us. We can talk all we want about the value of “failing well,” but when our actions speak the opposite, perhaps its time to stop with the band-aids and ice cream cones.

Let’s call a spade a spade.

spadefeature

Unless we’re willing to change the data-driven, high-stakes testing state of child-rearing and educating of which we’re complicit members, we cannot with clear conscience, talk about handing out “Certificates of Failure.”

 

Happy 4th of July!

 

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