Posts Tagged 'Educational Studies'

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Rebecca DeBoer

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

Read on for our next essay, and you can catch up with all the entries in other posts!

teacherBy Rebecca DeBoer

If you asked me 10 years ago about what I wanted to be when I grew up, I can guarantee that I would have never said teacher. I would have said I wanted to be an famous artist or someone who works with animals. Yet, here I am today; an Educational Studies and Psychology major in Marquette’s College of Education. Over the course of my life so far, I have volunteered and worked with children in a variety of settings. I have learned the joys a child can find in the words of a book, and the fun a child can experience with hands-on activities at a museum. Instead of finding passion in the arts or animals, I have found passion in the idea of helping to develop young minds and cultivating their God-given talents.

Just as I learned and grew throughout these past 10 years about what drove, inspired, and made me unique, so did Marquette’s College of Education. By education’s standing as a separate college, Marquette gives students like me a specialized opportunity at furthering my career, which in turn, furthers my quality of life. Components like Service Learning and internships help expand my experience and knowledge of what is to come in the adult world we are about to take on. Another major importance of having the College is the community it instills. Meeting people within Education ensures you have a community of students and professionals you can turn to for advice or simply a friendly face. Along with the relationships you build comes life lessons. In Dr. Lorentz’s class (my first education class of my life), I learned that “mastering” a talent or idea is never true mastery. As a teacher, we do not always truly know everything. It is okay to not know and accept new ideas. As Education majors, our careers are that of learning about learning, so how can we not ever be faced with developing ourselves along the way?

Having a separate College of Education shows current and incoming students who want to go into the field that there is a place to cultivate their goals and future careers. Through this, we see that the professional importance and personal importance of becoming an educator is intertwined. We as educators (and soon-to-be educators) take our various qualities and passions and put them out in a professional manner, after years of cultivating and “mastering” them. Thanks to the College of Education, we have the ability to “master” this knowledge and grow into the best version of ourselves.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Or about our undergraduate programs? Check us out online today!

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Hannah Jablonowski

This year, we are spending time getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Hannah, one of our current freshmen!

44920429_918894458308613_3681967040706379776_nMy name is Hannah Jablonowski. I am a freshman double majoring in Educational Studies and Psychology. I was born and raised right here in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Milwaukee is a beautiful city, and I cannot imagine living anywhere else. I come from a big family with my parents, two older sisters, and one older brother. My dad and brother graduated from University of Wisconsin-Madison, which makes the Marquette vs. Wisconsin basketball game very interesting at my house! My mom is a Marquette alum, and one of my sisters is a current junior in the College of Nursing. My oldest sister graduated from Loyola University of Chicago. I also have over 30 cousins!

My favorite educational experience has been volunteering at Highland Community School throughout my first semester at Marquette. Every week, I volunteered for two hours after my classes. I was placed in the after-school program for two- to three-year-olds. It has been my favorite educational experience because although I will not be pursuing that path as an educator, I loved helping out and teaching the children new games every week.

This summer, I am going to be a SPARK and Orientation Leader for the class of 2023! Specifically, I get to represent the College of Ed and meet the incoming students. Throughout high school, I was very involved with leadership activities and engaging with new students and families. I am very excited to continue to strengthen my leadership skills, as well as meet the new Freshmen class.

As I previously stated earlier, I come from a big family. I am the eighteenth family member to attend Marquette. I have been very familiar with this university for my whole life, and I knew that it would be the perfect fit for me. I love the smaller school environment and family feel that Marquette has. I have wanted to work in a school ever since I could remember. Three of my aunts, all Marquette alumni, are teachers. I have grown up watching them change the lives of their students and knew I wanted to do the same. Also, the majority of teachers I have had are Marquette alums. They are fantastic teachers and I knew that if I were to attend Marquette, I would be in good hands.

In my free time, I love practicing yoga, especially with my mom. I have been practicing yoga for nine years. My favorite part of yoga is that each practice is different. Somedays it can be difficult, but other days it can be the complete opposite. I also love how individualized yoga is. It is a different experience for everyone. Life can be busy and stressful, so yoga is my favorite way to unwind and relax! For anyone who is interested in yoga, find the nearest studio and go to a beginner class. I could not recommend yoga enough!

My mom is my biggest inspiration. Working as a NICU Nurse at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and raising my siblings and me she is someone I look up to and strive to be like one day. She has always encouraged me to be the best version of myself and to work as hard as I can. My mom helps change lives every day, and I knew I wanted to do the same. She is the most selfless, kind, caring, and hard-working person I know. She is a constant reminder of who I want to be one day.

At Marquette Basketball games, I love being as close to the court as possible! I go to as many games as I can, and I love cheering loud for the basketball teams. My friends and I always are dancing, singing, and jumping around and love being on the Jumbotron. If you find yourself at a Marquette game, keep an eye out for my friends and me!

Want to learn more about our undergraduate education programs? Head on over to our website for more information– or, even better, come visit us on campus!

Educational Studies Student Sharpens Her Skills

In March of 2017, the College of Education launched a new major and minor for undergraduate students called Educational Studies. Starting in the fall of 2017, interested students could enroll in this program geared towards those interested in education outside of the traditional classroom. Throughout the their time with this program, students will embark on semester- or year-long internships with local nonprofit organizations. Our first student intern is completing her placement at SHARP Literacy this fall — we caught up with Bri Cross, our College of Education senior, and Marisa Riepenhoff, VP of Education with SHARP, to learn more about it!


…the need to improve education in my community makes me want to be a part of trying to make a change.


Bri Cross, Educational Studies Intern

Iwas born and raised on the north side Milwaukee, WI. I attended Messmer Prep St. Mary for elementary/middle school and graduated from Pius XI Catholic High School in 2015. I have a lot of inspiration for my work and my passion! Growing up in Milwaukee is just one of them and the need to improve education in my community makes me want to be a part of trying to make a change.

Bri Cross, College of Education senior

My mom was in childcare for over 20 years and is now working in MPS. Therefore, watching how she was with the kids and how hard she worked made me want to be like her when I grew up (now I’m all grown up and following in her footsteps). I also have about 30+ younger cousins and they all look up to me. I am a first-generation student, and soon some of them will be, too. I want to be a positive role model towards them and encourage them to live up to their full potential. Since I’ve gone through it, I hope to be a resource that they will use in the future.

As an intern at SHARP Literacy, I assist with office work and programming. My office work includes: calendar inputs, organizing and analyzing surveys, printing and putting together materials for SHARP workshops and events. The programming duties include a couple of different pieces such as reading with the Golden Eagles and Pioneer program. I reach out to schools’ liaisons to see when collegiate athletic players are able to visit classrooms to read and interact with students. I also attend these events to make sure the day runs smoothly. Additionally, I assist with lesson planning for the intergenerational program. This program allows for students to visit assisted living homes to do projects with the seniors. When the students are at the location I help facilitate with the SHARP representative or the teacher. When they are not able to make it, I facilitate the workshop.

I’m so used to being around kids and interacting with them that it’s hard to pick a favorite educational experience. That being said, I’ve enjoyed stepping out my comfort zone and interacting with those who work in the SHARP office. It’s been a pleasure gaining insight from Marisa! She’s an incredible person to work with, and I’m highly appreciative that I received this opportunity.


Ask yourself what you are passionate about and then find organizations that fit your passion.


Marisa Riepenhoff, Vice President of Education for SHARP Literacy

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My role as VP of Education means that I manage the full-time education department at SHARP Literacy while working with the executive team and the board of directors to shape the overall education vision for the organization. I also work closely with school district leaders, school principals and community center leaders to make sure our programming meets the needs of elementary students and teachers in the classrooms and sites where we work. Finally, I am responsible for making sure we are accountable to our donors and that we are evaluating whether or not our education programs are meeting the goals we set to achieve.

I’m originally from Lake Ozark, Missouri, and have lived in Milwaukee for nine years. I was a theatre undergraduate major at the University of Missouri-Columbia and then I earned a Master of Science in Teaching from Pace University in New York City. I completed my certification to be a principal or director of instruction in the State of Wisconsin from Carroll University through their Educational Leadership program. I am currently an adjunct professor at Carroll University teaching an Educational Studies class about the design, development and delivery of education programs in non-profit settings.

I had a wonderful teacher when I was in elementary school named Barbara Duffy. The experiences she gave us in the natural world and in the arts shaped my vision for the types of content-rich learning experiences all kids deserve. From making dandelion waffles and violet syrup with flowers we picked ourselves to performing Shakespeare every year from first through eighth grade, she made science and reading come alive in ways that have enhanced my life personally and make me want to give back professionally.

My favorite experience working with Bri has been seeing her grow in her ownership of the programs she manages, especially the Reading with the Golden Eagles and Reading with the Pioneers programs. Seeing her confidence grow as she solves problems and works through coordinating with so many different schools has been rewarding. I also love laughing with Bri; it has been an honor to have an educational studies intern at SHARP. Our whole team loves working with her!

If you’re interested in pursuing an Educational Studies program, there are so many great organizations in Milwaukee to get to know! Ask yourself what you are passionate about and then find organizations that fit your passion. Set up informational interviews and even consider volunteering at organizations you’re curious about. My other recommendation is to have a disposition of flexibility. Working in the nonprofit sector means that you’ll wear many hats and will need to pitch in when necessary. Coming in with an attitude of being open to what needs to be done will go a long way!

Changing the Game: How Julia Magnasco Has Redefined What Teaching Looks Like Outside of the Classroom

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Julia Magnasco, Education Director for First Stage

In March 2017, Marquette University’s College of Education launched its new undergraduate major and minor, Educational Studies. To highlight professionals working in the field, the college profiled Community Advisory Board Member Julia Magnasco of First Stage. For 30 years, First Stage has been transforming lives through theater. As one of the nation’s most acclaimed children’s theaters and the second-largest company in Milwaukee, First Stage runs academies for children and schools while also producing plays and musicals for the city’s entertainment.

Julia Magnasco serves as First Stage’s Education Director and is a member of the College of Education’s Educational Studies Community Advisory Board. A program for students interested in education but not the traditional licensure of a classroom teacher, Educational Studies will prepare graduates to work in non-profit organizations or informal learning institutions such as First Stage. We sat down with Julia to learn more about her day-to-day life both on and off the stage along with her insight into what this new program could mean for our students and Milwaukee.

I’m very excited for this new major. There is a great need for educators outside the normal realm, whether it be an artist in schools or in community centers.


College of Education (COED): Thank you, Julia, for joining us! Can you tell us a bit about First Stage, your role in the organization, and what your day looks like?

Julia Magnasco (JM): I feel very lucky because my world is play! I’m the Education Director for First Stage. We are a professional theater for young audiences in Milwaukee. We are the second-largest theater company in the state and one of the largest theaters for young audiences in the nation. We have this incredible commitment to our community, but also to the field of theater for young people and families.

At First Stage we say we have three pillars. We have our productions where we put on shows for young people and families from three years old all the way through high school. Something we do that is really unique is “age-appropriate” casting. We use young performers side by with professional actors. It’s important to us that when young people are watching a show that they see themselves and their stories. They’re able to do some social bridging and social bonding from the experience of seeing productions. Young people have to see themselves on stage. Part of that is the need to see someone their age playing that character.

JM5The second pillar is theater academy. Our motto is teaching life skills through stage skills. The real goal of all of our programming in the academy is to nurture those socio-emotional abilities, EQ skills.

Our third pillar is education. We go into schools and community centers throughout the Milwaukee area with different workshops and opportunities right within that setting. We primarily use a method of teaching called “arts integration.” The idea of arts integration — and in our case, it’s drama — is looking at the process and actually teaching the standards that go along with it. The arts, like every other curricular subject, has its own set of standards and skills that need to be learned, and they need to be taught appropriately with that. We’re teaching the drama process while simultaneously teaching another curricular or social subject.

COED: How many students do you interact with in the course of a year? How do you work with schools and with community organizations?

JM: We end up facilitating over 2500 workshops every school year in over 750 classrooms, so we reach about 20,000 students. We want our students and community to have three touchpoints and come into the First Stage family. You might enter from coming to see a show, you might enter from First Stage coming to your classroom, you might enter by taking an academy class, but the idea is the connection with all these different levels in First Stage.

COED: How do you think our new program can be effective for tomorrow’s educational landscape?

JM: How do you look at education in a nontraditional setting? We’re looking at what the educational mandates are, what the new, exciting initiatives are — how we connect with those and how we can be game-changers both in the local community and on a national level. I think now more than ever our classrooms are so diverse, and it is important as educators to acknowledge that. We need to be responsive in our teaching and use the proper tools, giving opportunities to acknowledge and embrace that diversity — and to take the next generation to that level.

I’m very excited for this new major. There is a great need for educators outside the normal realm, whether it be an artist in schools or in community centers. This opportunity for engaged conversations and art has great power; art has the power to change. K-12 education for me looks different from what I experienced to what my daughter is experiencing now. There’s not a lot of art specialization right now in education, but that does not mean art is not present. We’re looking at it from a different lens. There is an opportunity to partner with school, teachers, and other organizations to bring these experiences to our community.

Want to learn more about the College of Education and its undergraduate educator preparation programs? Visit us online today!

 


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