Posts Tagged 'getting to know'

Getting to Know Our Students… Meet Katherine Lubar

This fall, we’re excited to get to know our students better, and we hope you are, too! Read on to meet Katherine Lubar and learn about her background and passion for clinical mental health.

Katherine LubarI am in my second year of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling master’s program. I grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and went to undergrad at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also spent a semester abroad in France during undergrad and worked in Denver with a ministry serving homeless youth for a summer. I moved to Milwaukee in the fall of 2017 to start grad school at Marquette.

My parents still live in Minnesota, and my older brother and his wife live in Milwaukee. My brother, sister-in-law, and I are all in grad school at Marquette this year!

This academic year, I have an internship in a counseling center at another college this semester as part of my master’s training. It is exciting to be able to apply the knowledge and skills I’m learning in my courses and further develop as a counselor through my internship experience.

I chose the College of Education and Marquette because I love the focus on social justice, advocacy, and multiculturalism within the College of Ed and how these are strongly incorporated into every aspect of the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology programs. The sense of community within the department and the support for students from faculty and staff also drew me to Marquette’s program.

In my free time, I love running, biking, yoga, and other sports, and I enjoy reading, cooking, and sewing when I have extra free time.  I also love spending time with friends and family and traveling as much as possible!

 

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Zachery Cramer

As we continue our series getting to know our students a little better this fall, we’d like to introduce you to Zachery Cramer, one of our SAHE students! And, check back to meet more students each week right here!

DSC_1325My name is Zachery Cramer, and I am a second-year graduate student in the Student Affairs in Higher Education Program (SAHE)!

I was born and raised in central Illinois — Princeville, IL, to be specific. I’ve been slowly moving north over the years as my undergraduate degree is from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL, where I studied Hospitality and Tourism Management.

I’ve lived in Milwaukee for a year and a month now! I live on the eastside and about a 5-minute walk from Bradford Beach. It’s definitely a nice change of pace after basically living in a corn field for 22 years.

My dad is a farmer and mechanic, and my mother is a Special Education Aide for middle schools. My younger sister just graduated high school and has been accepted to cosmetology school (so exciting!). Over the last several years, our family has become more dynamic as they have started to foster, and we have welcomed several dozen little ones in and out of our family.

My favorite educational experiences have been through my graduate program. There have been multiple courses where I lacked confidence in the topic areas, but our professors have done an amazing job in challenging my peers and me. Thanks to their work and belief in me, I feel like I’ve become more confident in my academic work and my capacity for engaging in new content.

This year I am serving as the Alumni Relations Chair for the Graduate Organization for Student Affairs in Higher Education (GO SAHE). I’m stoked to be able to engage with our alumni network from the SAHE program to serving as mentors, resources, and more for our current students. I’ll also start job searching in the spring, but I’m not too excited for that process yet.

I work a lot. I have a Graduate Assistantship (GA) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where I serve as the Riverview GA and the Leadership Programs GA. There, I supervise Resident Assistants, help to oversee a building of 150 students, and facilitate leadership programs for all of campus, from individuals to student organizations. This semester I am doing my graduate internship through the Marquette Student Wellness Center where I supervise the office assistants, work with our marketing and social media, and assist with other programming that comes out of our office.

A hobby that I have gotten into over the last year is running outside. I’ve become a snob where running inside is no longer enjoyable, and I need to be outside in the fresh air. This semester I plan on running three 5Ks! The Panther Prowl (UWM), Homecoming 5K (Marquette), and Hustle for Hearing (NIU). Running has been a very calming way for me to get outside and exercise while also allowing me to decompress after a long day/week.

I’ve also started “reading” audiobooks. Thanks to OverDrive (a super helpful app to check out) I can register my Milwaukee Public Library card. It allows me to check out books for a week at a time and listen while I’m commuting back and forth from Marquette to UWM to home. Just in August and September I finished seven books. If you have recommendations for good dystopian books, please let me know!

I really want to be able to support students as they go through their collegiate careers. When I was an undergraduate student I changed my major six times and never felt like I belonged in the classroom. It was thanks to student affairs professionals that I felt connected to the campus and the activities in which I was engaged. Thanks to these experiences and professionals, I now know that I am in the right place and doing the work that I’m meant to do.

I want to give a shout-out to some of my cohort members! Without them and the connections and experiences we have, graduate school would have been ten times harder than it already is. When I first decided to come here I was worried about being queer at a Jesuit institution, but I’ve felt supported the whole time I’ve been here! For those cohort members that work with me, thank you for making sure my work is quality and supporting me when I needed help. For those that share identities with me, thank you for helping to make being queer at Marquette possible. For those that meet up with me every Sunday for coffee, crying, and reading, thank you for always being willing to stay on topic (or completely veer off track).

 

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Brooke McArdle

We are continuing our blog series Getting to Know… Our Students this week with Brooke McArdle. Brooke is a sophomore in our teacher education program studying secondary education, history, and classical languages. Read on to learn more about Brooke!

mcardleI have spent the majority of my life in Brookfield, Wisconsin. My parents have had the biggest impact on my life, instilling values of compassion and service to others in both my brother and me. With service as the cornerstone of my life, my family was not surprised when I was called to be a teacher.

My favorite educational experience was participating in “Vocare” which was a two-week service immersion program during my senior year of high school. I had the privilege of spending my two weeks at St. Margaret Mary School working with the 5K class. I learned so much about teaching and about myself in those two weeks, and I am extraordinarily grateful to have had that opportunity.

This year I have applied for both the public health Global Brigades trip to Ghana as well as a Marquette Action Program (MAP) trip for which I do not know where I will be serving. I am very excited to hear if I have been selected for these opportunities. In Ghana, I would be educating a community about proper sanitation and helping to build facilities for them. Hopefully I will be selected for a MAP trip that involves education at a variety of sites around the United States.

I chose Marquette because of its Jesuit mission and the emphasis it places on service to others. Similarly, I was drawn to our College of Education because I knew that I wanted to be a part of the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) community.

When I am not in the classroom, I enjoy playing my violin and cello as well as baking, playing soccer, or having fun with family and friends. Music has helped shape me and has taught me so much. I think that everyone should have the opportunity to get involved with the arts, regardless of age or ability. My advice about playing violin or cello would be: stick with it because eventually you will go from playing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” to performing an incredible symphony!

My inspiration for being a teacher would be my parents as well as all the incredible teachers I have had before college because they have all had an impact on me in some way. My Latin teacher in high school and all of my high school History teachers, in particular, have sparked a fire in me that has made me very passionate about History and Latin. Also, my parents have always supported my desire to teach and have never tried to hold me back from pursuing my dream.

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Ryan Warner

Last spring, we got to know our faculty and staff right here on our blog! With the new semester, changing leaves, and fresh faces on campus, we wanted to take the time to introduce you to some of the students working to make a difference here in the College of Education. Read on to learn more about one of our doctoral students, Ryan Warner!

RCP_8918Ryan Warner is a fourth-year Counseling Psychology PhD candidate at Marquette University. He is currently completing his doctoral internship in Washington, DC as an active duty psychology resident within the United States Air Force.

 

Where did you grow up?

My hometown is Chicago, IL. I completed my bachelor’s degree at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Community Health-Rehabilitation and received a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I lived in Milwaukee for 3 years.

What’s your family like?

I come from a large and supportive family who promote love and education.

What is your favorite educational experience?

My favorite educational experience occurred during my masters program when I realized the path I wanted to take for my future career. Having conversations with faculty and staff regarding my aspirations of one day being a psychologist served as a catalyst for my decision to pursue a doctoral degree.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am excited to grow as a military officer and clinician during my psychology residency. Having opportunities to complete rotations in outpatient mental health, clinical health psychology, primary care integration/consultation, neuropsychological assessment, and substance abuse will expand my competence and skillset as a practitioner. Additionally, my role as a Captain and leader is assisting with both my personal and professional growth.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Ed?

I was particularly excited to attend Marquette because of the prestige and strength of the university and counseling psychology doctoral program. Additionally, the research of faculty directly aligned with my interests, and I was eager to embody the mission of excellence, faith, leadership, and service.

What do you like to do when you are outside of the classroom?

Outside of the classroom I enjoy traveling, exercising, watching movies, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends. These activities help re-energize me and provide balance in my life when my workload seems to be overwhelming. Taking time for myself helps to improve my well-being and overall happiness.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

My inspiration for my work and passion is fueled by my purpose in life. I am passionate about making individual, institutional, and systemic change within the organizations I serve. I plan to assist with promoting diversity and inclusivity within higher education institutions, while also working to mitigate the stigma of mental health throughout communities. My passion drives everything I do.

 

Welcome, Dr. Lee Za Ong

leeza-ong-2018Dr. Lee Za Ong has joined the Counselor Education Counseling Psychology this fall and will be working extensively with our new Rehabilitation Counseling Masters Degree. We had a chance to speak with Dr. Ong to get to know her better!

Where did you grow up? How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I was born and grew up in Malaysia. I went to Japan for my undergraduate and came to the US for my graduate degrees. I have lived in the US longer than I lived in Malaysia and have been in Milwaukee for 10 years. Before coming to Milwaukee, my family has lived in New York and California and driven across the country twice due to several job relocations.

What is your favorite educational experience?

When students actively engage in class discussion and add on to my ideas.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am doing a research project with Dr. Enaya Othman and other colleagues here at  Marquette University. This project focuses on investigating the stigma of disabilities among Muslim women in Milwaukee. I would also like to expand my research project regarding individuals’ attitude toward disability among other ethnicity in Wisconsin or in the nation.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Education?

The faculty members in the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology department are diverse, selfless, and engaging with the community. They are collective and are very skilled in lifting up people’s spirits. They are also a group of caring professors who are responsive to students’ needs.

What do you enjoy doing when you are outside of the classroom? 

I have been a board member of IndependenceFirst since 2014, and it has been an honor to be able to promote inclusion and the independent living of individual with disabilities. I have two children in high school and enjoy watching their musicals, band and swim events.  I admire young people’s talents and how they give everything into doing what they love. I hope that the world will be a better place with these passionate students. I also like to build relationship with people who are from different backgrounds. Their life experience and wisdom enhance my personal and professional development. An example could be the stories I listen to on The Moth podcast. The true stories that were told by people in the live show make me cry, laugh and feel in awe during my commute.

Any advice for readers who are interested in learning more?

The quality of the high school’s performing arts and music program are just as good as professional ones. You only spend a fraction of the cost, but you get to enjoy a world class performance by those of ages 14 and up. The children are the hidden treasure of the city. When building relationships with people who are different from you, even the simplest topic (such as food) can help seal a gap. As for The Moth, make sure you have a tissue box nearby. The stories presented in this inspiring podcast can move even the toughest to tears.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

Individual with disabilities, refugees and immigrants in the community are those who are my inspiration for my work. They have tirelessly demonstrated grit, resilience, endurance, and tolerance so they can build a bright future for next generations.

Getting to Know Courtney McNeal

McNeal_CourtneyThe College of Education is excited to continue allowing students to better know its faculty and staff. Mrs. Courtney McNeal is the Program Coordinator for the Hartman Literacy and Learning Center. Read on to learn more about Courtney!

 

Tell us about yourself!

I live in Kenosha, Wisconsin and work in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I am married to a high-school history teacher who also coaches cross country and track (all in Zion, IL). We have a lovely little house and the BEST cat you could ever ask for. His name is Sputnik, or Spud. Follow him on Instagram with #spudthestud. He is so fast, so tall, and so awesome. I do not have a green thumb. I enjoy baking cookies, pies, cakes, and other dessert items. I love to ride my bicycle on adventures. I am the best aunt ever and enjoy visiting my nieces and nephews in California and Washington. I love to play soccer and swim.

Where did you grow up and how long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I grew up in Willits, California, which is three hours north of San Francisco. It’s a small town in beautiful northern California. I attended Ripon College, in Ripon, Wisconsin for undergrad and after graduating with my teaching certificate, I moved to Marquette, Michigan, to work at Northern Michigan University as a Residence Hall Director. While at Northern I completed my Master’s in Psychology, Training and Development. I then moved to Kenosha, Wisconsin, where I worked as the Johnson Hall Director and Director of Community Service and Leadership Development at Carthage College. I started working for Marquette University in 2015 and still live in Kenosha. I have “lived” in the Midwest for 16 years (including when I was at Ripon College).

Whoa, you’ve been to so many places! What is your favorite educational experience?

One of the reasons that I started working in higher education instead of teaching high school social studies was because I really enjoyed the extracurricular learning opportunities that I had as an undergrad. I loved my classroom experience as well, BUT I really appreciated the way that my extracurricular experiences enhanced and enriched my classroom learning. I wanted to share this enthusiasm for learning both in and outside the classroom with students and that is why I enjoy working in Higher Education.

What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

I was looking for a position in higher education and came across the job in the Hartman Literacy and Learning Center. I knew that this was a job that I could excel in with my teacher training as an undergrad and my work at both Northern Michigan University and Carthage College. I was excited to be a part of Marquette University and to have a hand in such a great program (the Hartman Center) for Milwaukee and our COED students.

You’ve definitely made a difference here at Marquette! What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I have applied to the Master’s in Public Service program here at Marquette. I am looking forward to learning a new subject matter and how to apply this knowledge to my role at Marquette and in my volunteer work for the Kenosha Public Library.

So what do you do when you are outside of the office?

I am lover of libraries. I am the Vice President of the Kenosha Public Library Foundation and work to create community partnerships to increase funding for the Kenosha Public Library. I am also a member of the Friends of the Kenosha Public Library where I volunteer at their book sales and events to promote the library. And I love to volunteer for Outreach Services and the Bookmobile sharing the amazing resources that the library has with the community. Sharing all the amazing services that the library provides and does to support the community is what drives me to volunteer in these many ways for the Kenosha Public Library.

I am also a knitter, cross stitcher, and sewist. I have made many different knitted gifts for family, friends, and coworkers over the years. I started knitting in high school when my mom first taught be and have been knitting ever since. I occasionally take a class to learn a new technique but mostly, I rely on YouTube to show me the way. I really started cross stitching when I was between jobs and got into subversive cross stitching. I have been able to sew since I was in middle school and have recently started to sew my own dresses (with pockets). It’s tough work but I am learning and will one day be able to show off my skillz a work by wearing one of my outfits.

Tell us more about what your hobbies mean to you!

I enjoy knitting in while watching shows on NetFlix or AmazonPrime (we don’t have cable and can’t seem to get any reception for an antenna in our house). I have knit many a hat, kitchen towel, scarf, shawl, and blanket while binge watching detective shows. Cross stitching is what I do when I want to listen to a book on tape, because I have to be visually focused on the work, I can’t watch television. Sewing is coming along to either books on tape or watching shows on my laptop.

Any advice for readers who are interested in your hobbies?

Do not ask me to teach you how to learn a new skill. I find it hard to teach someone how to knit, cross stitch, or sew. I generally direct interested parties to YouTube videos or their local knitting, sewing, cross stitching shop for one-on-one instruction. Once you have learned the basics, then I am a much better teacher of certain skills or a project consultant.

You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!

Getting to Know Dr. Leigh van den Kieboom

VandenkieboomDr. Leigh van den Kieboom is  an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Policy & Leadership (EDPL). She teaches Elementary and Middle School Mathematics as well as Teaching in the Middle School. All throughout this semester, we’ve been getting to know our faculty a little better by sitting down to see what makes them who they are!

 

Tell us about yourself!

I am a mathematics teacher educator with twelve years of K-12 teaching experience who enjoys guiding pre-service teachers as they learn how to teach in our preparation program. I’ve worked in several school districts in the Milwaukee area and have been at Marquette University in the College of Education since 2000.

So where did you grow up?

I grew up in the Milwaukee area and completed an undergraduate and master’s degree at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee before finishing a doctoral degree at Marquette University.

Sounds like you’ve had many educational experiences! What is your favorite one?

As a K-12 student, I did not particularly enjoy mathematics. I found the subject challenging. I often asked my K-12 mathematics teachers to explain WHY the procedures I was using to solve problems worked. Most often, I received a repetition of the procedure rather than an explanation of the concept involved in the procedure. This was frustrating for me. While in college at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, my views of teaching and learning mathematics changed as I began to study WHY the procedures for problem solving worked. I was fascinated as I revisited the K-12 mathematics scope and sequence with a view toward teaching and learning that included using multiple and hands-on approaches to solving problems. I learned how to use reasoning to explain the thinking involved in the procedures I used to solve problems. I became passionate about sharing what I had learned with others. As a teacher, while most of my colleagues, espoused teaching reading as the favorite part of their practice, I was drawn to teaching and learning mathematics.

Whoa, that’s an amazing change in thinking about math! What drew you to Marquette and the COED?

The focus on social justice drew me to Marquette University and the College of Education. I was particularly drawn to a teacher preparation program that utilized a variety of urban school settings that provide pre-service teachers the opportunity to learn from a diverse group of K-12 students.

We’re glad that the COED was a good fit for you! What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

Revisions to the Marquette University’s common core as well as change to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s teacher licensing has created the opportunity for faculty in the College of Education to reimagine the coursework involved in the teacher preparation program.

Who is your inspiration for your work?

My mom and dad were both public school teachers. They loved their practice and spent years serving the students and parents in the school districts in which they worked. I grew up in their classrooms, first learning about teaching from them! Their passion for teaching inspired me to continue the same journey.

We’ve heard a lot about what you are like as a professor, but what do you do when you are outside of the classroom?

I am an avid sailor. I am part of a family crew (husband Jan; two sons, Pieter and Willem) who race a 38’ sailboat named “Nighthawk” on Lake Michigan. We enjoy weekly course races as well as long-distance races, The Queens Cup (South Shore Yacht Club to Muskegon Yacht Club) and The Chicago-Mackinac Race (Chicago to Mackinac Island). You can find me out on the water most of the summer!

Tell us more about what racing means to you!

Racing on Nighthawk is a beautiful experience that combines time on the water with family. We work as a team in different kinds of weather conditions on Lake Michigan. The most exciting part of the summer racing season is the Chicago-Mackinac race. We join over 300 sailboats in Chicago and sail 333 miles north to Mackinac Island. The race, which usually takes three days, includes weather patterns of every kind, from sunny skies to dark thunderstorms. The crew works 24-7, taking shifts through the night to keep the boat sailing.

Any advice for readers who are interested in sailing?

Marquette University has a sailing club. Interested participants can learn how to sail (on Lake Michigan) with friends from Marquette University!

You can learn more about the College of Education along with our undergraduate and graduate programs by visiting us online!


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