Posts Tagged 'mackenzie goertz'

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Mac Goertz

We are continuing getting to know our students this fall! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on our blog series. Read on to meet Mac Goertz, a counseling psychology doctoral student.

IMG_3300I’ll be entering into my third year in the Counseling Psychology doctoral program this year. While I have some remaining coursework, my main focus is now with clinical training and research.

Currently I’m training at two different practicum sites— I provide individual psychotherapy to patients in an integrated primary care setting at the Behavioral Medicine Primary Care Psychology Clinic at MCW/ Froedtert Hospital, and I conduct integrated psych testing with kids and adults at Psychological Assessment Services, LLC.

I very much enjoy working with Dr. Lisa Edwards in the Culture and Well-Being Lab. Over the past two years the lab has focused on a community-engaged research initiative called Proyecto Mamá, which seeks to assess the perinatal mental health experiences of Latina moms in the Milwaukee area using qualitative and asset-mapping research methods. The project is funded by a Marquette University Women and Girls of Color grant and is paving the way for future projects within the community, including Círculo de Mamás, a support group for Latina moms that we are developing at Sixteenth Street Clinic.

In my own research I’m curious about factors that promote critical consciousness around issues of race and racism. In particular, I want to know what helps White people become more racially aware and engaged. I want to know what moves Whites to engage in anti-racist work and how we can be better at doing this. In my own journey, I’ve had mentors that have been transformative in helping me to engage with race and consider my own racial attitudes, in particular through the IC-Race Lab (Immigration, Critical Race, and Cultural Equity Lab) in Chicago, IL. Thus, I’m interested in studying the potentially meaningful role of mentorship in promoting racial consciousness among White students.

I moved to Milwaukee in 2017 from Chicago, IL where I worked in addictions counseling in the West Loop of Chicago for a few years. In 2015 I received a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, with a specialization in Latinx Mental Health from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Before Chicago I lived in St. Augustine, FL where I attended Flagler College and earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology.

Both of my parents grew up in small towns in the Midwestern U.S and followed lifelong careers overseas. I was born in Maseru, Lesotho before our family moved to Swaziland, Uganda, and eventually Vanuatu in the South Pacific. In the 7th grade I attended a small Bahá’i boarding school in Vancouver Island, British Columbia where I remained through high school. I have two older brothers—and now two sister-in-laws! Family is foundational in my journey—they are the “strength to my sword arm,” as my mother would say.

The work of Dr. Lisa Edwards and the Culture and Well-Being Lab motivated me to apply to the Counseling Psychology doctoral program at Marquette. Dr. Edwards is a phenomenal force with an inspiring history of research in the areas of multicultural counseling, positive psychology, and Latinx psychology. She is also a mom—something that has been really important for me to see role modeled in academia.

I love the outdoors. Wisconsin has some incredible places to camp and hike. I’m a big fan of the Oak Leaf Trail where I enjoy walking my dog in the morning and evenings. I also love to hunt for antiques and oddities—I come from a long line of women with a talent for collecting and curating old and new. It’s important to me that my living and working space feel like me and where I come from. Mannequins, taxidermy, old farm tools, family quilts, and house plants line the walls of my home and the Airbnb apartment I manage.

Dr. Joseph L. White will forever be a guiding light in my journey. Considered the Godfather of Black Psychology, Dr. White was a change maker who revolutionized how we think about multicultural, strengths-based psychology today. His life and wisdom inspire me to keep moving forward and remind me that I have a responsibility to use my platform and privileges to work toward equity, healing and liberation.

The other force that inspires my work is my grandfather, Horace C. Walters. He was the last of his generation that I got to know and I recognize his story as so important to who I am. His life has taught me about love and family, about the importance of kindness and being true to conviction. I strive to honor him in the values I live by and the changes I fight for.

 


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