Posts Tagged 'Mary McQuillen'

More money, still a lot of problems: Mary McQuillen

This summer, seven of our undergraduate teacher education students and one intrepid faculty member are spending a month in Peru studying the educational system and discussing their own philosophies of education. They are writing and reflecting on their journey, and we are following along! Read on for excerpts and blurbs from Dr. Gibson and the students’ blogs. You can read more on Marquette Meets Peru and check back for updates here.  

Mary McQuillen

End of the day, the amount of privilege that someone is born into does not define the kind of person they will become. Through education, there is an ability to intervene and show students the path towards a better future.

So I just spent a week at one of the nicest elementary schools I have ever seen. It was beautiful, they had everything that a school should have for their students including top of the line technology, quality teachers, and resources galore. There were multiple soccer fields of astro-turf for the children to run around on, computer labs for intercambios, and just about every kind of program that a child could dream of. It is a little scary that this isn’t even considered to be one of the top 10 most expensive schools in Peru, its 32nd! I have to admit it was awesome to work there, all of the students seemed to be excelling beyond their ages academically. They were a joy to work with, had fantastic manners, and made teaching easy. The only real issue that I bore witness to in the classroom was the constant chatter in the background, which isn’t bad for 5 year olds. A well rounded education requires students to be more than just intellectually fit. In my Jesuit high school, we had to fulfill RIPLOC in order to graduate. This meant we had to be religious, intellectually competent, physically fit, loving, open to growth and committed to doing justice. I think that a privileged school has a responsibility to the world that has been so kind to them. In the article response by Ruben A. Gaztambide-Fernández and Adam Howard they state, “It may seem counterintuitive that economically advantaged individuals would be concerned with and committed to social and economic justice, since they are the ones who benefit most from inequality” (P2). In saying this, the author is identifying the irony of educating students who have privilege how the system benefits them and hurts others. Underneath that irony, there is a goal of wanting to help make the world a better place, does that mean that people who have more should give away all of their extra money to people who have less? Not necessarily.

End of the day, the amount of privilege that someone is born into does not define the kind of person they will become. Through education, there is an ability to intervene and show students the path towards a better future. It teaches them valuable moral lessons that will help them to become wonderful people down the line. Although it may seem ironic at first, underneath it all I believe that people want to be good. To do good they have to be shown, especially if they are not exposed first hand to the issues of the world around us. People are always saying that the first step is to educate on the issues because most of the time people have no idea what is going on in the world. I went out to the club on Saturday, and I probably shouldn’t be telling you that I did that, but it’s a fact. Anyway, while at the club I was talking about my time here, which consisted of a number of visits to el Augustino. I told this to someone, and the guy literally looked at me with shock and was like “YOU WENT TO THE GHETTO!?”. Me being the person that I am, I got up in his face about Patty, my little friends at the casitas, and how they are going to be better people that this rich douche will ever be. He clearly didn’t get a just education that pushed him to be better, do better, and strive to eliminate some of the inequality in this world. A lot of people won’t have teachers or a school community that challenges them to look outside of their lush lifestyle and learn how to use their privilege as a platform to appeal to more people for justice.

To have an education that focuses on expectations of becoming a person responsible for their choices in the world and understanding what the consequences are is beneficial for the entire world. It is the goal of many teachers because “any classroom that employs a holistic model of learning will also be a place where teachers grow, and are empowered by the process.” (Engaged Pedagody, 21). Most teachers want their students to succeed in becoming well rounded people, because that means that they have succeeded as teachers. This means that they have to provide opportunities for learning that goes deep down into the mysteries of the world. They won’t always have the right answers but they need to be open to challenging questions about the norms of society, critiques about different systems, and constant confusion about why the world is the way it is.

For the most part, we will have had to grapple with some of the hard concepts along with our students. We will learn so much from all of their different opinions, beliefs, and background knowledge that they bring into our classroom. They will push us to find answers in different places and inspire us to try to be the change that we wish to see in the world. We will have to lead by example and that is not always an easy task. It means that we need to be genuine, honest, and transparent with our students at all times. I hope that I will be able to do this with my students the way some of my teachers have done so with me. Every time a teacher answered my question with a question instead of turning me away, I was engaged. Every time I was pushed to look deeper, criticize harder, and think more I took steps in the right direction, helping me to become who I am today. Not that I’m the best person in the world, but I have good intentions and an open heart and I hope that I will remember that when a student comes to me with difficult questions about poverty, crime, evil, and pain.

So educating the social elite means that we challenge them to be more than just intellectually competent, and rise so much higher to be well rounded citizens of the world.

Dewey and Freire @ Bat: Mary McQuillen

This summer, seven of our undergraduate teacher education students and one intrepid faculty member are spending a month in Peru studying the educational system and discussing their own philosophies of education. They are writing and reflecting on their journey, and we are following along! Read on for excerpts and blurbs from Dr. Gibson and the students’ blogs. You can read more on Marquette Meets Peru and check back for updates here.  

Mary McQuillen

Our purpose is to lead the kids on a journey to help them make sense of the world based on their instincts. Teachers should help the students to achieve moral and intellectual growth by showing them the path and setting them up for their own discovery.

Dewey would have absolutely loved the way that Roosevelt has their curriculum structured. He would applaud them for having such an active role for the students and for allowing them to go in depth in their learning. His whole entire theory is that for the most part, students have four different types of instincts and we should teach to them. He believes that students have a social instinct in which they appreciate the formation of relationships in their lives. Roosevelt has a number of after school organizations that reach a wide variety of students to bring them together with their peers, this ranges from sports to robotics teams. They have a huge emphasis on collaboration and provide many different areas for students to work together. The next instinct is that they have an investigative instinct in which they have a desire to make things. All of this allows opportunities for inquiry learning, a huge goal of Roosevelt. They have a room called the “Idea Room” stacked with 3D printers, tools, and every sort of material that could inspire students. Then there is the Expressive, artistic instinct that is on the constructive side as well. This ties into the idea room, but it goes even further in the arts programs that the school provides. They have a ginormous auditorium for theatre for the students to perform on, they showcase artwork of all the students, even the younger ones, and they have a great music program too. The last instinct is the language and communication instinct, and since Roosevelt is an American school all classes are spoken in English. Since a number of the students are Spanish speaking to begin with, they end up becoming bilingual through this process. This helps them because it widens their range of schools for the future. So in Dewey’s perspective, this school would receive two thumbs up.

Then on the other side of it, Dewey would say that there are a lot of issues with the schools in areas like Augustino and even Fé y Alegría because they don’t allow the student to work in as many inquiry based learning activities. Instead of focusing on the experiences of the students they pay much more attention to the content. I think that this is part of the issue with Dewey’s whole mindset. He praises the schools that have the money to be able to provide every learning opportunity possible, but in doing so he ends up limiting the amount of students that can be reached. He also made a whole big generalization about the instincts because he excludes all of the students to have learning disabilities or don’t fit into the category of what he describes as a capable student. But that’s just me getting off track because I don’t really like his ideas because he’s just full of it…. In his world, and in the schools founded based off of his pedagogy, the most valuable thing for a student is the experience and the teacher’s role should be as a helper or a museum curator. Our purpose is to lead the kids on a journey to help them make sense of the world based on their instincts. Teachers should help the students to achieve moral and intellectual growth by showing them the path and setting them up for their own discovery.

Freire also calls for experience to become a larger part of the learning process, he talks about banking education and how can end up creating an oppressive society. Banking education refers to the storing of information as a sort of deposit system, “in which the students are the depositories and the teacher is the depositor. Instead of communicating, the teacher issues communiqués and makes deposits which the students patiently receive, memorize and repeat,” (72). In his opinion, the education system has been overrun by the mindset that the students need the teacher to learn instead of having it be a sort of partnership or a connection that the student and teacher can make together. He believes that students should be able to pose the problems in that occur in their lives and that through the problem posing education they will be able to free themselves and better understand the world around them. He would be in awe of all the work that Roosevelt does for its students, the opportunities are endless, the activities are unlimited, and the students have the ability to tackle problems that matter most to them.

I don’t really know how he would respond to the other schools that we have been to, partially because I am working with such young students at De La Inmaculada and Fé y Alegría that I am not even really sure of what the approach is for these students. What I have noticed so far that I really love at DLC is how the students work together so well to uplift the student who has special needs in the class. They encourage her, they play with her, and they make her smile non-stop. I think that this shows that they tackled the problems of inclusivity and tolerance pretty early on and that’s something that Freire would be proud of. When it comes down to it, I can feel a strong sense of community in each of the different schools that we visited except for Roosevelt. I’m not calling them out by any means, but I’m simply passing on what I have observed so far. The people of El Augustino work together so well to create a safe environment for the children through the Socio Deportivo and Casitas, the students at DLC showing love to one another, and the amount of pride Lenny has for Fé y Alegría show me something below the surface. They deal with their problems in a different way, without as fancy of equipment or special rooms dedicated to ideas but through critical thinking and working as a community and I think that Freire would be pretty impressed.

Blog Número Tres: Mary McQuillen

This summer, seven of our undergraduate teacher education students and one intrepid faculty member are spending a month in Peru studying the educational system and discussing their own philosophies of education. They are writing and reflecting on their journey, and we are following along! Read on for excerpts and blurbs from Dr. Gibson and the students’ blogs. You can read more on Marquette Meets Peru and check back for updates here.  

Mary McQuillen

When we walked around I was placing blame and asking myself how the government doesn’t give these people more money, and I had to remind myself where the money in America goes.

People recognize the need for change in the education systems, if they didn’t there wouldn’t be nearly as much talk to address these issues. Poverty is something that a lot of people are unable to ignore, no matter how hard they try might try. Today we went up to Pamplona Alta, a place that the wealthy Peruvians continually try to forget. Most of Lima lives in shanty towns and communities that are located high up on the hills. This began with an invasion of the area on January 6th, a number of years ago. They “invaded” the land and converted it into makeshift homes, some more finished than others. It was quite shocking to see the living conditions that most people live in every day. They have to drive/ walk/ hitch a ride all the way up to the top of the hill and then when the road stops they have to walk up the stairs. This is their only means of getting to and from their homes, which is an issue for them in many different ways. When there is an emergency like someone is giving birth at 2 in the morning, their husband has to carry them down the plethora of unsafe, steep, concrete steps in the dark. Then they must wait for a taxi to take them in to the city to the nearest hospital because there is only one medical post for over 60,000 people.

Unfortunately, this also means that mundane things become a heavy work load, specifically when it comes to water. People of Pamplona Alta have great big jugs given to them from the municipalities, they are located by their homes to store their water. To fill up one jug of water costs 15 soles and will last a family of 3 or 4 people only a few days. To put this into perspective, Lauren, a woman who lives in Pueblo Libre (near our host stay, a middle class area) has to pay 20 soles a month to have water in her home. Education is also a mess up in Pamplona, there is only one public school up near that area and it fills up quickly. After that, families have to pay to send their children to private schools. Most of these families aren’t able to do that because they don’t have any money to spare after buying food and water, so the kids don’t go to school. There is a Fé y Alegría school in the area but there are so few teachers who want to work there or have the ability to work there that some classrooms are empty. I’m really glad that we read the article, “Extreme Poverty in America” before we came to Pamplona Alta because it helped give me some perspective. This article listed some pretty horrifying statistics that made me ashamed to be pointing my finger anywhere else, one of these being, “By most indicators, the US is one of the world’s wealthiest countries. It spends more on national defense than China, Saudi Arabia, Russia, the United Kingdom, India, France and Japan combined.”. When we walked around I was placing blame and asking myself how the government doesn’t give these people more money, and I had to remind myself where the money in America goes. It’s really humbling, sometimes we need to quiet our judgements and focus on the good instead. People in this are genuinely care about each other, I watched a taxi driver help a woman carry a full gas tank up a very long and steep staircase. They have a community there and its pretty incredible to witness.

There just so happens to be a great big wall, labeled the Wall of Shame that separates Pamplona Alta from a very rich area. The article we read on this wall grouped it with a number of other walls that, “outline physical spaces in a way that controls, excludes and limits access to resources, land and even cultural identity.”. I just wanted to make one that I learned yesterday clear, this wall was created because if they weren’t people would build their homes in other people’s backyards. Some of these people live on private land that belongs to someone else right now. So the reason it was built was to create a border between how far people could push into standing neighborhoods. Even if these are really rich neighborhoods, that isn’t right because the land belongs to someone else. This is why the situation gets sticky, I definitely do not think that this wall limits cultural identity because I saw a lot of artistic expression in the community. I obviously think that it is unfair that one side of the wall has more than they know what to do with and the other side of the wall is struggling to get by, but I haven’t come up with a solution for where these people should go because there simply is not enough space. Within Education there is this perspective of compensatory education, which has the goal of helping students by using inputs of education such as funding, teachers, curriculum, school day length and attempting to equalize the outputs of test scores, graduation rates, life expectancy, earnings, and incarceration rates. The idea makes a lot of sense, but as we talked about in lecture, the Coleman report clearly outlines that the inputs do not equalize the outputs. But this doesn’t mean we should stop trying to work on the inputs because it’s the right thing to do. At the end of the Compensatory Education the author wrote, “To the millions of children that Title I and Head Start have served, though, it has made important differences in their lives, their families’ lives, and in their schools.” The article evaluated how effective the programs Title I and Head Start were in education, while they will never be able to equalize the inputs and outputs, they still made a difference.

So then the question we are left with is, how do we help educate the people of Pamplona Alta? We don’t need to keep up with the compensatory education with the goal of equalization in mind, but we should keep on trying to make life better for the students. In Pamplona Alta, that specifically means more teachers and schools. It made me rethink how I felt about the privatization of education in Peru because even if the people might not be well trained they still are well intentioned. At this point, there are so many children who are out of school up there and its simply an injustice. I personally feel as though the state should make some sort of incentive for the teachers to get them working up in Pamplona Alta. Then again, there are more than enough issues back in America so who am I to make these suggestions in Peru?

How we can save the education system: Mary McQuillen

This summer, seven of our undergraduate teacher education students and one intrepid faculty member are spending a month in Peru studying the educational system and discussing their own philosophies of education. They are writing and reflecting on their journey, and we are following along! Read on for excerpts and blurbs from Dr. Gibson and the students’ blogs. You can read more on Marquette Meets Peru and check back for updates here.  

Mary McQuillen

Clearly we see where the problems are in the low-fee schools and the public schools, it comes down to whichever is the lesser of two evils.

Today we visited Fé y Alegría which is a charter school. It is a much better version of a charter school than those we read about for today. In the readings, they explain how low-fee schools seemed to be a solution to problems in the Peruvian education system but have actually become more of a problem. Throughout Peru there has been an insane (FYI Figure 4 doesn’t have numbers, so I’m just going to stick with the term insane) amount of private schools that have been founded since 2004.

I consider myself a fairly educated person at this point, I mean I have had 4 years of college! Therefore, I think it would be alright to justify my assumption that Peru is continuing to start more and more low-fee schools throughout their country because they are working so well. Ehhhh. Nope. But don’t feel bad if you had the same thought cross your mind too; it’s basically common sense. The way I see it is that if something is making a difference in the school system by improving the student scores and performance then by all means, keep it going. On the other hand, if it doesn’t work we should probably not be repeating the same mistake. In the article The Default Privatization of Peruvian Education and the Rise of Low-fee Private Schools, the author criticizes privatization of public education by claiming that it is not a solution by any means. Instead, it continues “intensifying educational segregation while misleadingly capitalizing on the hopes and dreams of the poor” (page 3). The reason that these charter schools are still in business comes down to out of necessity, not choice. This study had a lot of information, but what I found to be the most important is what the parents of students at these schools had to say. Their only reasons for going to the charter schools were because they were closer and the teachers would actually teach. The teachers of the public schools did not teach due to the long months spent being on strike and their need to take on other jobs because being a teacher didn’t pay enough.

Today in seminar we talked about the different types of schools in America, and how publicly funded schools and privately funded schools differentiate. Within charter schools there are two divisions, instrumental charter schools or non-instrumental charter schools. Instrumental charter schools have teacher unions, so they answer to the district administration they just have more freedom on how you run the school. All public schools have teacher unions due to the fact that teacher unions benefit the teachers by helping them earn better pay and have better conditions to teach in. As a result, they are happier teachers which means the students will be happier students. There are then non-instrumental charter schools who are not unionized. We didn’t go into as much depth as to how things work in Peru, but it seems to me that things are kind of backwards. The public school teachers do not have unions that work collectively towards better pay and teaching conditions, this causes the teachers to strike or take on more jobs than they can handle. They then fail to teach their students and all of this becomes a GIGANTIC waste of everyone’s time. Then in come the low-fee schools with teachers that have better salaries and expectations that they will be present for class. The article Public Education Is Up for Salesaid it best when they wrote, “A quarter century after privatization began in earnest, it is clear that its main effect has been to undermine the public schools.” What this really means for a parent is that the choice is pretty much made for you. Such a shame due to the fact that the teachers and administration of the low-fee schools are, for the most part, unqualified and unfit. So the students and teacher may both be in the classroom, but that doesn’t mean that there is intellectual learning going on. Clearly we see where the problems are in the low-fee schools and the public schools, it comes down to whichever is the lesser of two evils.

Walking into Fé y Alegría this morning was quite the experience! There was a huge open courtyard, someone was making a colorful poster with sparkly sticker letters on it. There were computer rooms, science labs, even sewing machines! I don’t have that much backstory on this school but what I do know is that it has public funding but private administration. I was pretty shocked that all of his was publicly funded but I mean, what do I know?! Bottom line, it was a beautiful school. Our seminar didn’t take place until a few hours after our visit, so I had a lot of time to think about the contrast between my great personal experience and the conclusions of both articles. It’s now 9:30 pm and after further evaluation I have finally come up with a conclusion; it’s what works best for the individual.

We had a fairly busy day today, consisting of Spanish class, a visit to Colegio Roosevelt (an international school $$$) and then seminar. So Roosevelt was like awe inspiringly perfect in every way… except for the fact that half of Peru has nothing and this school has a few 3D printers, 27 acres of land, and computers as far as the eye could see. Making this the most extra school I have EVER visited. For homework we read a paragraph of a book called The Global Achievement Gapin which the author believes that a quality school is a school that teaches seven specific skills: critical thinking and problem solving, collaboration across networks and learning by influence, agility and adaptability, initiative and entrepreneurialism, effective communication, effective oral and written communication, and accessing and analyzing information and curiosity and imagination. According to the author, this school is a quality school because it definitely provides opportunities for its students to learn all of these schools. But is that enough? Let’s ask my dear old friends Kantor and Lowe who wrote Reflection on History and Quality of Education. On page two they wrote, “If quality education is taken to mean a structured curriculum taught by engaged, engaging, and well-educated teachers in schools committed to the promotion of intellectual development, we simply cannot locate much of it in the past” (p2). Clearly we have two different thought processes going on, and according to Kantor and Lowe Roosevelt doesn’t really meet the criteria for a quality school.

After some great discussion during seminar we came to the conclusion that Kantor and Lowe believed that a quality school prepares its students for going out into the job force. I don’t know if these students will be ready for what life throws at them, but I do believe that it is important to look at how SEA provided education to people that migrated to Lima. During Felix’s presentation, he mentioned that the Jesuits would help provide popular education. This meant plumbing, electricity, and social consciousness that helped people get jobs! Wait a second, another problem has arisen (In education?? Really??). Now it is Toni, the author of the book who wouldn’t qualify this form of education as quality education.

By the end of this blog I was hoping to have solved all of the problems within the education system, both in Peru as well as in the US. Looks like I couldn’t figure it out quite yet. What I have discovered is that not a single person, not even myself, has the best definition of quality education because it’s just not that simple. That doesn’t mean that we should stop analyzing, criticizing, and applying what we have learned to the world around us. In fact, we should do the opposite, we should keep striving to make that definition, to help our students, and to create a healthy school environment for all

Marquette Meets Peru: Mary McQuillen

This summer, seven of our undergraduate teacher education students and one intrepid faculty member are spending a month in Peru studying the educational system and discussing their own philosophies of education. They are writing and reflecting on their journey, and we are following along! Read on for excerpts and blurbs from Dr. Gibson and the students’ blogs. You can read more on Marquette Meets Peru and check back for updates here.  

Mary McQuillen

We felt the sun on our faces, the humidity attacking our freshly washed hair, and soaked in every minute of it.

IMG_7671Gabrielle and I came a day early which was fantastic because we had a whole day of free time to explore. At the time of our arrival though, we were pretty terrified. We made it through eleven hours of travel fairly easily. There was one hard landing that almost threw me out of my seat, but I let it slide because I couldn’t fly a plane to save my life! When we touched down at the Lima International Airport we effortlessly made it through customs. I had a look of sheer bliss overcome my face while I received my newest passport stamp, but that quickly turned to nerves that my suitcase was lost. It took around half an hour longer than expected for our luggage to arrive safely into our arms and then we were on our way welcomed by a nice taxi man with a sign with our names written on it. We drove through the crowded madness of traffic that surprised me at such a late hour of the night. Half an hour later we finally made it.

Our little host mom, Chela gave us great big hugs as our host father Carlos grabbed our bags. We got to talking and we noticed a collection of mugs above the fireplace, each one with a different college emblem on it. “AGH,” Gabrielle and I thought simultaneously, we should have gotten her a mug. We shrugged off the thought and began to converse with our new family for the next two weeks. My Spanish is a little rusty but I had some confidence thanks to passing the Duolingo placement test, so through some broken Spanish we started to get to know each other. This only lasted a few moments because we were exhausted from our flight, when we opened the door to our room a huge smile spread across my face because of the two little puppies printed on my blanket. We were given a tour of the house, shown how to use the shower, and had to keep reminding ourselves NOT to drink the water. Thankfully, Chela has been doing this for a while, and she knows how to prepare meals that will keep us safe.

We slept for so long, incredibly grateful for the blackout curtains that blocked out the light. We were awakened only once by a slight earthquake around 6:00 am. Yes, that’s correct. We were abruptly awakened by an earthquake last night! At first I thought it was a dream but Gabrielle confirmed that this was in fact reality that was shaking. At this point I began to doubt that I had made the right decision but all of a sudden my eyelids felt heavy, and I drifted back to sleep. When I arose the next time, many hours later, to sweet Chela asking us if we were ready for breakfast… at 12:00 pm, all of my fears vanished. The stairs are for some reason ridiculously slippery so my simple trip down the stairs became: sit on your butt — scoot down a step — scoot down a step — scoot down a step- etc, while gripping the railing for dear life. Why not take off your socks? some might ask. I am currently asking myself the same thing!

Breakfast was wonderful, pan y queso, platanos, y leche. Exactly what we needed to start the day off right. Chela told us stories about her adventures abroad visiting her niece who lives in Orlando, Florida. She made sure to remind us a few times that crossing the street was nowhere near as safe in Peru as it is in the US. She was right. When we began our adventure to the currency exchange later in the afternoon we made sure to latch on to the nearest Peruvians and only cross while they were crossing. Eventually we made it to this charming little park, it had big, bright red flowers and a playground. We were so distracted by the flowers we almost didn’t even notice the different trees that were trimmed to look like an array of different animals. At this park we sat and began to think about where we were going to go for lunch. We felt the sun on our faces, the humidity attacking our freshly washed hair, and soaked in every minute of it.

For lunch we ventured far and wide. We didn’t really have a choice since we had no idea where we were going or what we were doing. Eventually we settled on a place and the first thing we were served was chicha, a purple drink that upon researching it, we found out is made out of fermented purple corn. They had no water, they had no beer, but they had chicha as far as the eye could see! The camarero came to our table with a menu del día, he explained much too rapidly that most of the options were all gone. After we gave him puzzled looks as a response, he slowed down his tempo and explained twice (or was it three times?) more that there were limited options. With more blank stares coming his way, he eventually said “yo puedo escoger por ustedes.” Now, THAT I understood! “Sí, sí por favor!” we exclaimed! We were a little less enthusiastic when we saw what was coming our way, but hey! We were adventurers right? If we can come all the way over to Peru, then we can try a scary looking meal… at least Gabrielle could. I chickened out a little bit, or a lot a bit. Our second dish was rice and some very colorful looking potatoes! Apparently, there are thousands of different types of potatoes here in Peru. We ate up and walked back to our lovely little home.

I love walking back to our little home because it’s right next to a dog park! I don’t know if it is actually a dog park but each time I have walked past it there have been at least three or four dogs there. In my opinion that fulfills the requirements of a dog park. We took a lovely little — three-hour nap — and woke up with dinner waiting for us. We were groggy as could be but nonetheless made sure to find time to practice with the tricky keys we were going to need to rely on for the next two weeks. Cravings kicked in and we absolutely needed to find ice cream, so we checked on google and found a Panera- not the beloved bread company of my native homeland- but a gelateria! We made the ten-minute trek and shared stories along the way. With ice cream in our bellies we decided to explore a little more before heading back home. All of a sudden, our ears were blessed with the sound of the legendary Michael Jackson filled the streets. We had to find the source! An IMPERSONATOR!!! Such a fantastic way to end our day, I attempted to attach a video because no words can describe this man’s raw talent, but apparently Medium wasn’t having it today. Whatever. We laughed off the calories of the gelato and made it home safely.


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