Posts Tagged 'tenth anniversary'

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Rebecca DeBoer

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

Read on for our next essay, and you can catch up with all the entries in other posts!

teacherBy Rebecca DeBoer

If you asked me 10 years ago about what I wanted to be when I grew up, I can guarantee that I would have never said teacher. I would have said I wanted to be an famous artist or someone who works with animals. Yet, here I am today; an Educational Studies and Psychology major in Marquette’s College of Education. Over the course of my life so far, I have volunteered and worked with children in a variety of settings. I have learned the joys a child can find in the words of a book, and the fun a child can experience with hands-on activities at a museum. Instead of finding passion in the arts or animals, I have found passion in the idea of helping to develop young minds and cultivating their God-given talents.

Just as I learned and grew throughout these past 10 years about what drove, inspired, and made me unique, so did Marquette’s College of Education. By education’s standing as a separate college, Marquette gives students like me a specialized opportunity at furthering my career, which in turn, furthers my quality of life. Components like Service Learning and internships help expand my experience and knowledge of what is to come in the adult world we are about to take on. Another major importance of having the College is the community it instills. Meeting people within Education ensures you have a community of students and professionals you can turn to for advice or simply a friendly face. Along with the relationships you build comes life lessons. In Dr. Lorentz’s class (my first education class of my life), I learned that “mastering” a talent or idea is never true mastery. As a teacher, we do not always truly know everything. It is okay to not know and accept new ideas. As Education majors, our careers are that of learning about learning, so how can we not ever be faced with developing ourselves along the way?

Having a separate College of Education shows current and incoming students who want to go into the field that there is a place to cultivate their goals and future careers. Through this, we see that the professional importance and personal importance of becoming an educator is intertwined. We as educators (and soon-to-be educators) take our various qualities and passions and put them out in a professional manner, after years of cultivating and “mastering” them. Thanks to the College of Education, we have the ability to “master” this knowledge and grow into the best version of ourselves.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Or about our undergraduate programs? Check us out online today!

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Thomas Schatz

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

Read on for our next essay, and you can catch up with all the entries in other posts!

Marquette_University_campusBy Thomas Schatz

Marquette’s College of Education is reaching the ten-year anniversary of its designation as an individual college. A designation worth celebrating because of how it has affected the curriculum, and more importantly, the people who are invested in the Milwaukee educational system and education as a whole. The separation from the College of Arts and Sciences has allowed for countless new opportunities to be discussed and implemented. This includes new educational experiences such as the college’s summer Peru trip and even a new major, Educational Studies, to become part of the College’s offerings. It has certainly been a great ten years, and there is no better time to be a student, faculty, or supporter of the Marquette College of Education.

The world needs great leaders to enter the teaching force more than ever now. Because of this immense need, there also needs to an emphasis on calling people into the vocation of teaching. The individual status of our college has allowed for outreach to ensure this need is met by qualified teachers across the country. Even looking at just my freshman education class, I see students from coast to coast come here looking for a truly unique curriculum that not only will prepare us to teach but prepare us to become transformative leaders for the next generation of students. This means more educators, and well-prepared educators at that, are now schooling in Milwaukee. This effort is only greatened when you factor in how being an individual college allows for more funding for student scholarships. This is something that as a student I am eternally thankful for, and I am certainly not alone in this sentiment. This is a grand gesture in a time where money has become such a strong deterrent for amazing students considering the life of a teacher. The college has been an undeniably powerful source at dispelling this issue.

Lastly, I cannot discount all the ways in which the college has personally affected me beyond even what is mentioned above. I truly feel as if there is one thing that everyone looks at as a beacon of light and hope in a world that can be so dark sometimes. This beacon of light is education. Education is a gift that needs to be shared and given by those best prepared. The College of Education truly buys into this thought of teaching for social justice, a theme very in line with the Jesuit values of Marquette. I come to Schroeder Complex every day knowing that I am being surrounded by professors and students alike that feel the same way as I do. Marquette educators are not mere teachers. No, far from it. Rather, we are leaders that go out to set the world ablaze and change lives everywhere. So, on the tenth anniversary of our outstanding college, I thank the college for all it offers me, and I hope everyone joins me in thanking them for what they do to Be the Difference.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Or our undergraduate programs? Check us out online today!

 

 

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Claire Bernatz

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

Read on for our next entry!

scienceBy Claire Bernatz

One of the things that brought me to Marquette was its mantra, “Be the Difference.” With this in mind, I know I chose a university that would do everything it can to make sure I can make a positive impact onto this world. As a freshman, I started out as a Biomedical Science major in the doctoral program in physical therapy (DPT). I chose DPT because I wanted to help the younger generations find and get back to a passion they discover.

Reflecting, that doesn’t sound like someone who should be in the medical field, but it does sound like someone who should be a teacher. With the College of Education being its own college, I was able to get one-on-one advice and guidance on my future and what it would look like if I made the switch into education. The attention and care the College of Education offered me is priceless. Because of the college’s influence, making the switch to education was a no-brainer.

The college’s attention to detail in their community through service learning and student teaching only confirmed that I was in the right field of study. I have the ability to still follow my passion for biology with a double major in secondary education and broad field science. The ability to double major gives me the confidence to go into any classroom and be able to teach the necessary instruction needed. Being a woman in broad field science, I feel even more confident in my ability to be diverse and to inspire those from all backgrounds to find their love in discovery.  The development of my professional life is priceless, and I am proud to say I will be a graduate from the College of Education. The skills given to me are life lessons that will continue to impact me for the rest of my life. I am extremely grateful for my time at Marquette University and the constant love and support the College of Education shows me. With the college being its own college, I know I will graduate with the tools needed to “Be the Difference.”

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Check us out online today!

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Nora McCaughey

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

We’re excited to share the entries with you; please read on for Nora McCaughey’s essay.

coed logo vertical full colorBy Nora McCaughey

It can be difficult for college students to find their place in a university. Not everyone has the luxury of finding a club, sport or other extracurricular that they love. Even those who have been so fortunate may find themselves hungry for something more. That’s precisely why it’s so crucial for each student to have a college where they are with like-minded people. It’s an opportunity for them to flourish with others who have the same passions, the same ambitions. Of course this could theoretically be done without designating the College of Education as its own college, but by separating it from the College of Arts and Sciences, Marquette is effectively giving all education majors more opportunities. I think that this is especially crucial with this specific college. Education majors are as dedicated to their subject as any other, but often don’t get the “glam” of being a nurse or engineer later in life. Less pay and less acclaim in the future can be disheartening to young future educators, but they are given a space to be with others who share the same core values and have the same ideals for their life. Having a separate college validates education students who are feeling that they aren’t as accomplished or as valuable as STEM or other majors.

Marquette University having a College of Education has been beneficial to me time and time again. It began in SPARK, when all College of Education students were placed in the same group. I cannot think of a better way to have started my college experience than by bonding not only with other scared freshman, but with students who were interested in the same field of study as me. Even though we all had different second majors, our love of teaching brought us all together. I still see many of these SPARK students in my education classes, and it is so fantastic to be able to walk into a class on the first day and already have a group of people that you know. Since SPARK groups are formed by college, I’m not sure if I had been placed in the group for the College of Arts and Sciences that I would have had the same experience that I did, and I am certain that I wouldn’t have felt so at home in my first classes if I hadn’t had been in a SPARK group with others like me. This is only one example of the many that I feel the College of Education is deserving of, and I am eager to see what other benefits Marquette’s decision will bring to incoming and current education students.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Check us out online today!

On the Tenth Anniversary of the College of Education: Hannah Jablonowski

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

We’re continuing to share our students’ essays below!

downloadBy Hannah Jablonowski

Since 1881, Marquette has proven what it means to be the difference. From the many accomplishments the university has had as a whole to the everyday accomplishments by current students and alumni, Marquette is full of success. I believe that creating the College of Education is one of those accomplishments. Creating a College of Education was a way to help aspiring future educators feel a sense of belonging and importance in the community, while also creating an unlimited amount of opportunities for them.

When I considered Marquette for my college path, I was blown away with the College of Education. From the Service Learning opportunities during the first semester of freshman year, to the happiness I felt knowing it was a tight-knit community, I truly felt like I was home. If Education were merely a school, I am not sure if I would feel the same way or even have chosen Marquette. Having a College of Education is important for not only the university and its students, but for the community. Teachers are everywhere in our daily lives. Everyone has been impacted by teachers throughout their lives. The amount of work that teachers and other educators do for their students often goes unrecognized. It is important for communities to know that we are designated as a College because they know that education is something we value. We value students who are studying to become educators so much that Marquette wanted to have Education to be a College. Communities know that we are passionate and strive to be the best educators possible. Having a College for Education proves that.

Being a part of the College of Education is very important to me. I am the eighteenth member of my family to attend Marquette University. My mom, sister, aunts, uncles, and cousins have all studied in various majors at Marquette. The reason why I wanted to be involved in education is because of my three aunts. They attended Marquette and graduated from the School of Education. They are incredible teachers and I have always looked up to them. They were taught everything they know about being a teacher from Marquette University. I knew if I were to go here, I would be just as great as they are one day. I remember discussing with them how I was excited to be a part of the College of Education at Marquette. I specifically remember them becoming so excited that I would be the first member of our family to be a part of the College of Education.

It truly is an honor to be the first family member involved in the College of Education at Marquette because this university means so much to my family. My aunts knew how much the School of Education did for them, and they cannot wait to see what the College of Education will do for me.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Check us out online today!

 

On the 10th Anniversary of the College of Education: Oscar Guzman

This year, the College of Education is celebrating its 10th anniversary since becoming a college! In commemoration, our undergraduate students were invited to participate in an essay contest with the following prompt:

Given our rich history, (1) Why do you think it is important that we are designated as a College (for instance, within the University and to our community partners) and (2) Why is our being a College important to you professionally and/or personally?

Please read Oscar Guzman’s essay below; he was our third place winner!

downloadBy Oscar Guzman

He walked me down the hall; my heart was beating steadily: inhale, exhale – I told myself. After introducing me to the professor who would lead the interview, he walked back to the larger group of eager graduating high school seniors applying for Marquette’s scholarship for the College of Education. Remembering which professor sat across from me that cold February morning is beyond me. Still, I recall sharing my first drive into Milwaukee that morning with my dad and friend, Gustavo. A firm handshake, my father advised in his native-Spanish tongue, always look them in the eye, y como siempre, echale ganas. His words echoed in my attentive ear as I watched the professor prepare a list of questions. Her first question: tell me about your experiences with volunteering. Her second question: share with me your aspirations for wanting to pursue a profession in education. With nervous eyes but a hopeful heart, I spoke my truth. Then, four years after my interview and being rewarded the scholarship, I would like to say this: to whomever interviewed me that late-winter morning, thank you for recognizing my truth as worthy for Marquette’s College of Education; if I could sit with you once more prior to graduation, I would like to share that my journey as a Golden Eagle has been one of faith, family, leadership, service, and reflection. So today, I reflect on why it is critical that Marquette recognized Education as deserving of being its own college.

By creating a college for Education, Marquette succeeded in not only creating a community within its campus, but forming bonds and opportunities with the city of Milwaukee. Since my first day at Marquette as a freshman, I have completed field experience at various schools throughout Milwaukee. Perhaps, by creating a college dedicated for education, our faculty were granted the resources and opportunities to recognize and form relationships with Milwaukee Public Schools, allowing our students to gain experience through practice and service, a quality upon which the College of Education prides itself. Moreover, recognizing education as a college opened doors for innovate and applicable research for its faculty and students. From our Hartman Literacy and Learning Center to research in multicultural counseling, our facilities and the scholarship help our faculty and students to demonstrate why it is worthwhile to do some good in our community. Our being a college offered me opportunities to develop professionally through practice and service, and by allowing me to participate in research alongside our faculty. However, most importantly, our being a college has encouraged Marquette to invest in its education students, and such an investment through scholarship is the reason why I am here. As I prepare to leave the halls of Schroeder Complex, I say goodbye with a heavy heart but with a head held high hoping that someday another eager freshman Mexican-boy will be roaming these halls, and I know Marquette’s College of Education, with its Jesuit values, will make a teacher out of him, a teacher of students.

Interested in learning more about the College of Education and our ongoing service to our community? Check us out online today!


What is a Marquette Educator?

Follow us on Twitter

Archives