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The Milwaukee Brewers Seek Positive Message Commercials to Strike Out Bullying

By Elizabeth Jorgensen

Objective: Create a commercial with a positive message to Strike Out Bullying. (Your commercial should be a positive message to raise awareness of bullying prevention at school, online or in the community.)

Eligibility: Teachers of students in grades 6-12 (students must be 13 or older) at a public or private school in Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Washington or Waukesha County, WI are eligible to participate.

Entry: The entry period began on Monday, January 23, 2017, at 3:00 pm CT and ends Friday, April 21, 2017, at 11:59 pm CT. Teachers must submit a link to their submission. Submissions must be on a publicly accessible online platform (YouTube, Instagram, Vimeo or some other public video platform), be in the English language and not exceed 2 minutes in length.

Judging criteria: The winning video will be selected by a panel of judges assembled by the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club. The videos will be judged on the conciseness, positivity, creativity and originality of the message raising awareness of bullying prevention at school, online, and in the community.

Prize: One video will be selected as the winner. The winner will receive a visit to his/her school for his/her class from Brewers players, coaches and/or alumni on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The students in winner’s class (grade) will also receive complimentary t-shirts and game tickets for the Brewers home game played at Miller Park on Friday, May 12, 2017, at 7:10 pm, and on-field recognition. One student from the winning video will throw out the ceremonial first pitch (if there is more than one student in the video, a name from the creative team will be drawn at the school visit the day before the game).

Rules:

  • The creative team appearing in the video can be one (1) to six (6) people, but no larger than a group of six (6). All students on the creative team must be in the same grade.
  • No one under the age of 13 may be in the video.
  • A teacher is allowed to submit more than one entry from the same grade at the same school. Each entry must have a different set of students in each video.
  • The video must not exceed 2 minutes in length.
  • Online entry only. No other method of entry will be accepted.

To find out more, check out this website.

 

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Maundy Thursday

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On Not Judging a Field Trip by Its Cover

images (3)By Sabrina Bartels

When I was younger, my parents would always tell me not to judge a book by its cover. I used to think that they would say this just because I was always going to the library and finding new books to read. I would always pick the books with the brightest colors and the most pages, regardless of whether I liked the subject matter or not. It wasn’t until I was older that I began appreciating the nondescript books hidden on the shelves: the romantic escapades penned by Jane Austen, the tragic love story told in The Great Gatsby, and the adventures experienced in The Chronicles of Narnia. To this day, my love of reading has not changed.

But I’ve thought about that age-old adage that my parents used to tell me, and it’s taken on a whole new meaning after a recent experience.

One of the perks of being a school counselor is getting invited on field trips. This year, two of the sixth grade classes asked me to chaperone their trip to the Milwaukee County Zoo. The first group told me that they were going to place all of the kids I hadn’t gotten to know as well in my group. Perfect! I got to spend some one-on-one time with seven really awesome kids. I learned about their hobbies, their passions, their quirky personalities, and their hilarious senses of humor. I came back from that trip feeling awesome and ready to conquer the next field trip.

And then I was handed my group assignment. Not going to lie, I cringed a bit.

In an effort to reduce the sheer amount of drama/conflict going on in that class, all of us chaperones were handed at least one girl who was heavily involved in the drama. In my group were three girls whom I knew were often in the thick of things. Okay, two of them weren’t always the prime suspects, but they definitely had a hand in contributing. I was worried because not only did I have three possible girls who were involved in drama, but I had one of the top drama starters in my group, someone whom I talked to on almost a daily basis about starting drama. I almost cried.

So the next morning, I prepared myself. I set ground rules. I told them that if I had to speak to them even once about drama, they were getting a detention the minute we got back to school. As we started our walk through the zoo, I found myself dreading every minute, because every minute brought us closer to possible drama.

But you know what? It didn’t.

I spent a lot of time before the field trip worrying about how I was going to control my particular group. I didn’t need to. This group turned out better than my other, which is definitely saying something.

These girls – these girls that I had worried about with drama, and girls that I had talked to earlier that month about keeping their nose out of it – were perfect. And I do mean PERFECT. They were quiet. They were patient. They did their worksheet with little to no prompting from me. They were polite to the younger kids, letting them get closer to the windows so they could see the animals. When one older gentleman walked through the aviary with us, pointing out every species of bird that the zoo had, my girls were attentive and asked great questions. I was worried that they were going to roll their eyes, or get on their phones, but they didn’t. They acted so incredibly mature. It was amazing.

As we rode back to school, I began chastising myself. Here, I had been dreading the entire affair, and it had turned out that my fears were groundless. My students were great. In essence, I had done exactly what my parents had always warned me not to do. I had judged all of my “books” by their covers.

To see that my students had this whole other side to them was fulfilling. It raised my spirits. It reminded me that I only get to see one facet of my students at school; it is so rare to see every side of my student in the seven hours that I have them. (How often do we show all of our own sides to the people we work with?) And then I reminded myself that I need to love and appreciate the side of my students that I do see, whether it’s their best side or not. I need to cherish these students as they are. No matter what, they are still my students, and still deserve my care, concern, and support.

It was a good lesson. I hope you all get to experience it someday as well!

Technology: Your Secret Weapon at Work!

images (2)By Stephanie Nicoletti

Last month I explained how when used correctly, technology can be your secret weapon. It can, and I am hoping to shed some light on that! I will explain how I used technology as my secret weapon in our first grade classroom.

Writer’s Workshop can be a tough time for young writers since their writing skills are still developing. When we started our “All About Writing” unit I wanted to make this as engaging as possible for my students, because in years past they have really struggled with this unit. Students were paired up on iPads and created nonfiction books on the app, BookCreator. Students selected topics they know a lot about, wrote down at least three details, and then began to create their All About Books. The students had to appropriately use various text features, correct details, and photos that were researched. This was very engaging for first-graders, crossed literacy and writing skills in one project, and finally gave students a sense of ownership for their learning. This is just one way I used technology as my secret weapon in our first grade classroom, with this mindset the learning opportunities are endless for our students!

Check out our published ebooks below!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLuAej1ssHL8x989YwttaTsmbWG6VVK303

 


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