Archive for the 'Counseling and Human Services' Category

Changing Climate: Counselors Getting Crafty!

By Sabrina Bartels

At the start of this school year, the Student Services department decided to help “beautify” our building. Here are some fun things we did to help our school climate!

  1. “Be the nice kid” quote. This was one of the most difficult things we did, but it was definitely worth it. We started by purchasing white paint and painting over a small section of the brick wall. We then projected a picture of the quote on the wall and traced the lettering, before finishing off the words with a couple coats of paint. It was finicky and stressful, but we’ve gotten tons of compliments on it. If you’re thinking of adding this quote to your school, we recommend picking up a variety of brushes to accommodate the different fonts. Also, this is a team activity – all the painting can get very tedious for just one person! Be the nice kid
  2. Drake bulletin board. Our students love this one (and also use it as an excuse to sing the song “Hey Keke.”) We saw a bulletin board on Facebook that used the quote, so we adjusted it a little to fit our school and added our own picture of Drake. We hope that it encourages our students to start thinking about their post-secondary education paths. It’s also a fun way to incorporate a little pop culture into school! Bulletin Board
  3. And speaking of education paths … we added a bulletin board outside of Student Services so we could post our own educational paths. Our students love seeing where all of us went to school! We’ve also used our new bulletin board to post inspirational quotes for our students to read. Educational PathwaysEducational PathStudent Services board
  4. Inside Out bulletin board. We also created a bulletin board that offers students a gentle reminder about what we do in Student Services. So often, we have students who don’t know what our roles are, or what they can talk to us about. Inside Out
  5. Pennants. In September, we sent out emails to (almost) all of the colleges and universities in Wisconsin, asking for pennants and any “swag” the colleges had to promote their school. The responses we got were overwhelming! Around 15 schools (Marquette included!) not only sent us pennants, but were super generous in sending us t-shirts, temporary tattoos, stickers/decals, water bottles, and more! Thanks to their kindness, we are able to start discussing post-secondary education right now with our students. We wanted to hang them over the bulletin board outside our office, but are trying to find something better than duct tape to hold them up.

Getting to Know Our Students… Meet James McDonald

We are continuing our blog series Getting to Know… Our Students this week with James McDonald. James is in his first year of the Counseling Psychology doctoral program, and his return to Marquette AND the College of Education is both a personal and professional homecoming.

DSCN0834I am a Marquette alumnus and first year Counseling Psychology PhD student. I completed the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program here in 2017. I began my PhD at the University of Georgia, but had the chance to come back to Marquette to work with Dr. Cook and I couldn’t be more thrilled. I grew up in the beautiful Pacific Northwest! Seattle, Washington to be precise. My family small! Nowadays, it’s mostly just my Mom and me. We have some distant family in other parts of the country, but holidays are quiet (haha). This will be my third year living in Milwaukee and I love it. It’s a perfectly sized city, with tons of beautiful old buildings and friendly people.

Being in a PhD program is a wonderful privilege because ideas and professional development are the focus. Marquette is such a tremendously supportive and challenging student-focused environment, and I am very proud of the education I have received here. My other favorite educational experience was during my first semester in the master’s program here at MU. Dr. Cook offered students the opportunity to participate in additional counseling skills groups outside of class and to receive real-time feedback. That experience, more than any other, propelled my counseling skill development.

This year, I have one focus: research, research, research! My dissertation is in the early stages of development and it is so exciting to see it begin to come together. There is a ton of research happening in the department and I am hoping to take the opportunity to be involved in as much as I can!

Initially, when I applied to the master’s program at MU I was drawn to the philosophy of the training program and that it was accredited and well-respected. I also had a thirst for adventure and to experience something new after spending most of my life in Seattle. I wanted to be challenged! During my time at MU, I have come to respect and appreciate the rigor of the training and have grown tremendously as a professional. The faculty and staff work tirelessly to provide a rich educational experience for students. Coming back for my doctoral work was such a natural fit; it felt like coming home!

Outside of the classroom, I love music. Before coming to graduate school, I was in a band in Seattle for years. After relocating to Milwaukee, my friend Peter (who is also in the doc program here) and I started playing together and are working on getting a group together. We’d like to record something and hopefully play some gigs in the area! It’s been fun to keep a connection to that part of myself. Otherwise, I am always down for a good sci-fi, drama, or comedy flick.

My passion for my work is all about building the knowledge and skills as a psychologist to be of service to clients and communities. As a field, all our research, policy, advocacy, and clinical efforts must be focused on making a meaningful difference in the lives of our clients. Feel free to reach out to me if you are at all interested in a Clinical Mental Health Counseling master’s or Counseling Psychology doctoral program (james.mcdonald@marquette.edu)! It can be very confusing. I am always happy to chat or help as best I can!

Getting to Know Our Students… Meet Katherine Lubar

This fall, we’re excited to get to know our students better, and we hope you are, too! Read on to meet Katherine Lubar and learn about her background and passion for clinical mental health.

Katherine LubarI am in my second year of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling master’s program. I grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and went to undergrad at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also spent a semester abroad in France during undergrad and worked in Denver with a ministry serving homeless youth for a summer. I moved to Milwaukee in the fall of 2017 to start grad school at Marquette.

My parents still live in Minnesota, and my older brother and his wife live in Milwaukee. My brother, sister-in-law, and I are all in grad school at Marquette this year!

This academic year, I have an internship in a counseling center at another college this semester as part of my master’s training. It is exciting to be able to apply the knowledge and skills I’m learning in my courses and further develop as a counselor through my internship experience.

I chose the College of Education and Marquette because I love the focus on social justice, advocacy, and multiculturalism within the College of Ed and how these are strongly incorporated into every aspect of the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology programs. The sense of community within the department and the support for students from faculty and staff also drew me to Marquette’s program.

In my free time, I love running, biking, yoga, and other sports, and I enjoy reading, cooking, and sewing when I have extra free time.  I also love spending time with friends and family and traveling as much as possible!

 

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Ryan Warner

Last spring, we got to know our faculty and staff right here on our blog! With the new semester, changing leaves, and fresh faces on campus, we wanted to take the time to introduce you to some of the students working to make a difference here in the College of Education. Read on to learn more about one of our doctoral students, Ryan Warner!

RCP_8918Ryan Warner is a fourth-year Counseling Psychology PhD candidate at Marquette University. He is currently completing his doctoral internship in Washington, DC as an active duty psychology resident within the United States Air Force.

 

Where did you grow up?

My hometown is Chicago, IL. I completed my bachelor’s degree at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Community Health-Rehabilitation and received a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I lived in Milwaukee for 3 years.

What’s your family like?

I come from a large and supportive family who promote love and education.

What is your favorite educational experience?

My favorite educational experience occurred during my masters program when I realized the path I wanted to take for my future career. Having conversations with faculty and staff regarding my aspirations of one day being a psychologist served as a catalyst for my decision to pursue a doctoral degree.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am excited to grow as a military officer and clinician during my psychology residency. Having opportunities to complete rotations in outpatient mental health, clinical health psychology, primary care integration/consultation, neuropsychological assessment, and substance abuse will expand my competence and skillset as a practitioner. Additionally, my role as a Captain and leader is assisting with both my personal and professional growth.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Ed?

I was particularly excited to attend Marquette because of the prestige and strength of the university and counseling psychology doctoral program. Additionally, the research of faculty directly aligned with my interests, and I was eager to embody the mission of excellence, faith, leadership, and service.

What do you like to do when you are outside of the classroom?

Outside of the classroom I enjoy traveling, exercising, watching movies, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends. These activities help re-energize me and provide balance in my life when my workload seems to be overwhelming. Taking time for myself helps to improve my well-being and overall happiness.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

My inspiration for my work and passion is fueled by my purpose in life. I am passionate about making individual, institutional, and systemic change within the organizations I serve. I plan to assist with promoting diversity and inclusivity within higher education institutions, while also working to mitigate the stigma of mental health throughout communities. My passion drives everything I do.

 

Welcome, Dr. Lee Za Ong

leeza-ong-2018Dr. Lee Za Ong has joined the Counselor Education Counseling Psychology this fall and will be working extensively with our new Rehabilitation Counseling Masters Degree. We had a chance to speak with Dr. Ong to get to know her better!

Where did you grow up? How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I was born and grew up in Malaysia. I went to Japan for my undergraduate and came to the US for my graduate degrees. I have lived in the US longer than I lived in Malaysia and have been in Milwaukee for 10 years. Before coming to Milwaukee, my family has lived in New York and California and driven across the country twice due to several job relocations.

What is your favorite educational experience?

When students actively engage in class discussion and add on to my ideas.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am doing a research project with Dr. Enaya Othman and other colleagues here at  Marquette University. This project focuses on investigating the stigma of disabilities among Muslim women in Milwaukee. I would also like to expand my research project regarding individuals’ attitude toward disability among other ethnicity in Wisconsin or in the nation.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Education?

The faculty members in the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology department are diverse, selfless, and engaging with the community. They are collective and are very skilled in lifting up people’s spirits. They are also a group of caring professors who are responsive to students’ needs.

What do you enjoy doing when you are outside of the classroom? 

I have been a board member of IndependenceFirst since 2014, and it has been an honor to be able to promote inclusion and the independent living of individual with disabilities. I have two children in high school and enjoy watching their musicals, band and swim events.  I admire young people’s talents and how they give everything into doing what they love. I hope that the world will be a better place with these passionate students. I also like to build relationship with people who are from different backgrounds. Their life experience and wisdom enhance my personal and professional development. An example could be the stories I listen to on The Moth podcast. The true stories that were told by people in the live show make me cry, laugh and feel in awe during my commute.

Any advice for readers who are interested in learning more?

The quality of the high school’s performing arts and music program are just as good as professional ones. You only spend a fraction of the cost, but you get to enjoy a world class performance by those of ages 14 and up. The children are the hidden treasure of the city. When building relationships with people who are different from you, even the simplest topic (such as food) can help seal a gap. As for The Moth, make sure you have a tissue box nearby. The stories presented in this inspiring podcast can move even the toughest to tears.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

Individual with disabilities, refugees and immigrants in the community are those who are my inspiration for my work. They have tirelessly demonstrated grit, resilience, endurance, and tolerance so they can build a bright future for next generations.

WEB and 6th grade orientation: Watching my 8th graders become leaders

Blue_lockers_at_IATCSBy Sabrina Bartels

At the end of last school year, we introduced a new concept to our 8th grade students called WEB. WEB, which stands for Where Everyone Belongs, promotes a welcoming environment in schools and encourages students to be leaders in their school community. At my school, we asked teachers to recommend students they thought would be good leaders and help us run the 6th grade student orientation. The results were, in my opinion, amazing.

There were two really great moments that stood out to me as an adult on the WEB team. The first moment was when I looked at the initial list of students being recommended as WEB leaders. There were several students I “expected” to see on the list: the kids who were always polite, responsible, and volunteered for multiple opportunities throughout the year. But there were also a good number of students who I considered “emerging leaders”: students who absolutely had leadership potential, but were not typically picked first for leadership opportunities. I think of some shyer students, or the boy who was a little outspoken during class, or the kind girl who really struggled in terms of attendance. Some of those students never believed in themselves to be leaders. Talking with some of them and giving them an application to be a WEB leader was such a rewarding moment. The smiles on their faces, and the pride they felt when they heard that teachers had suggested them, were amazing.

The second moment was seeing the leaders in action during the 6th grade orientation. I will be honest: I was a little nervous during our training days. Some of our students were still very shy and reserved. There were some students who were reluctant to practice some of the activities because they were embarrassed (we had a lot of activities that required moving, dancing, and doing things in silly voices.) We frequently discussed as a big group how all of us adults were embarrassed as well, but that we had the mindset that we were doing this for the 6th graders. Several of our students took comfort in that fact that we were embarrassed and nervous too! The day of the training, our students were fantastic. They completely surpassed my expectations.

I had students volunteering to run groups on their own instead of in pairs when the number of 6th graders exceeded our estimates (I was especially proud of one of my students with anxiety, who bravely volunteered to run her own group and did amazing with it!) There were 8th graders going out of their way to welcome students who were extremely nervous. I saw my shy students burst out of their shells and participate fully in every activity, which encouraged our 6th grade students to do the same. Many of our leaders even took it upon themselves to organize the 6th graders in the lunch line – something none of us had asked them to do, but man, were their efforts appreciated! In my opinion, the day went smoothly, and my 8th graders impressed me beyond belief.

I am excited to see how WEB transforms our school climate. We will have activities throughout the year that our WEB leaders will run, and I think the 8th graders are just as excited as we are about this. Seeing how WEB has already helped many of my students become stronger leaders makes me excited for the future. I anticipate great things for this year!

Starting the Semester with Intention and Positivity

This post originally appeared on Dr. Lisa Edward’s blog Hopeful Mama on July 9, 2018.


colorful-autumn-leaves-871286965014L8g8By Lisa Edwards

Yes, the Fall semester is upon us. Summer is over and despite all my best intentions to come up with a summer plan to be super productive, I don’t feel like I got enough work done. Now I need to quickly finalize my syllabus, attend college and department back-to-school meetings, and start responding to the emails about reference letters that have already begun to fill my inbox.

It would be easy at a time like this to become sour and start to dread the semester, especially because we know it can be intense. In some ways, semesters are like marathons, where you give more for 15 weeks than you probably ever would during a normal “run.”

If the semester is like a 15-week marathon, it seems like we should be psyching ourselves up with positive thoughts, rather than pessimism and negativity. No-one starts a marathon thinking “this is going to be so awful,” right? They probably think it will be hard, they’re up for the challenge, and they’re going to do their best.

​As I look ahead to my marathon of the Fall semester, I’m going to do all I can to start the race with a positive attitude. I’m not expecting that every day will be positive, or that I’ll be able to maintain my positivity through all of the challenges, but I want to at least have that as my starting point.

 

Below are some strategies for starting the semester off on the right foot:

Intentionality – Rather than watching the semester fly by like a kite being dragged by the wind, I’m going to be a little more intentional about my planning. First, I’m going to try and stop my work early (in other words, not when I’m already 10 minutes late for the daycare pickup), and “take stock” for a second. What priority tasks have to be accomplished the next day, and in what order should I tackle them when I arrive to the office? I’m also going to schedule a coffee or lunch meeting with a colleague every few weeks because I know that type of break will help me stay energized. And if I don’t put something on the calendar in advance, it will be November before I remember to even think about doing it!

Focus on Positive Colleagues and Conversation – I love venting as much as the next person, but I realize that after a while it can bring me down. Not to mention that I can also start to spread my own negativity and bring others down. My goal for this semester is to complain a little less, and to try and get extra time with those colleagues who lift me up (see Intentionality above).  I’m also going to adopt one of Dr. Christine Carter’s 19 ways to reduce workplace stressStop talking about how busy and stressed I am. Dr. Carter reminds us that the more we talk about being busy (even if it’s just in our head), the more we’re actually training our brains to believe we should be freaking out.

Mix Things Up – There are positive things I sometimes want to try but hold back from doing because they sound like they will be too complicated, take up too much time, or adjust the family routine in some challenging way. Ironically, it may be just those things that I need in my month or semester to stay positive. Exercising early one morning while my husband gets the kids ready, scheduling a monthly get-together for drinks with a friend, using that gift card I got three years ago for a massage, or trying a new craft or cooking class. Why not treat one of these like an experiment in my life, and see how it works? Will it be disruptive or time-consuming? Maybe. Will it help with my self-care? Maybe. I’m guessing I’ll really enjoy it and it will give me that burst of positivity I might need, but I won’t know until I try…

What will be your strategies for starting Fall with positivity? 

 

This article originally appeared on hopefulmama.com on 8/28/16.


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