Archive for the 'Learning' Category

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Juwonna Walker

This year, we are spending time getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Juwonna, one of our undergraduates!

UnknownHi, my name is Juwonna Walker. I grew up on the North and East side of Milwaukee, for the majority of my life. I have also lived in Texas, Minnesota and Tennessee. I currently work, play, and live right here in Milwaukee. I have a huge family from many different states. I have six siblings on my mom’s side, and two siblings on my dad’s side. I am the oldest of all my siblings, and they are a variety of ages. It is never a dull moment in my family, because there is so many different personalities.

I work for the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office as a Victim/Witness Clerical Assistant. I like having the opportunity to work there because I interact with so many amazing staff members and have the opportunity to gain experience for my future career in social work.

My favorite educational experience is participating in field placements. I have been working with children for many years now in various positions and communities. Field placements give pre-service teachers the opportunity to get teaching experience, interact with students, and develop and learn pedagogies for our own classes. The most exciting opportunity I had this semester is being able to draft my own math mini lessons to work with one-on-one with a middle school student.

I transferred to Marquette from another local university in 2018. I chose Marquette because I wanted to Be the Difference for black and brown children in urban schools. I felt at Marquette I could receive the best education to adequately prepare me to teach in Wisconsin schools. I have always majored in elementary education because I love working with and learning from students in 3rd-8th grade.

When I am outside of the classroom I am volunteering as a Big Sister for Big Brothers and Big Sisters. I have been a Big since my first semester at Marquette, after being a participant in SERVE. When I’m not doing that, I am attending cultural and social justice events on campus, to learn more about how I can be an active member in change. I also run track and field as a sprinter, my events are 100m, 200m, 4x100m, 4x200m, hurdles, and long jump.

The inspiration for my work is seeing children that come from where I come from, speak the way I speak, and look the way I look to have opportunities to do great things. When I look at black and brown children, I see inventors, scientists, artists, and people that are capable of amazing things. So, I want to be a person who advocates and assist children accomplish their dreams.

Want to learn more about the College of Education and our students? Visit our website or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to continue the conversation!

On Professionalism, Social Media and Privacy

KR
By Kathryn Rochford

Hi everyone! I hope you all had a wonderful winter break and that you’ve started the semester off strong! It’s going to be a busy one, but I hope it treats us all well.

I wanted to take this opportunity to talk about an experience I had last semester that today is growing increasingly more relevant. This experience relates to the theme of professionalism, social media, and the issue of privacy.

Last semester I was blessed to spend my field experience at Marquette University High School, an all-boys, Catholic high school. I learned so much about teaching styles, classroom management and the importance of relationships with students. However, being one of the two females in the classroom (the other being my coordinating teacher), there were some instances of awkwardness. The main one I want to focus on is when I was casually scrolling through Instagram, and I got a notification of a new follower request. I clicked on the notification to see who it was and, with sudden dread, I realized it was one of the students in the classroom I observed.

A million thoughts seemed to flood through my head. How did he find my Instagram when I’ve never told the students my first name? Why did this specific student follow me if it’s not a student I regularly held conversations with? Do I mention the topic with the student? With my coordinating teacher? Do I make a class announcement about the importance of privacy and the separation that needs to be maintained between students and teachers online?

After careful consideration, and plenty of frazzled conversations with my teacher friends and non-teacher friends alike, I decided to bring it up to my coordinating teacher. She laughed for a bit and said she was surprised that specific student followed me, since again, he never talked to me much. She shared stories of how this has happened before to other observing students she’s had and the issues it had caused them. She recommended I leave it unanswered, since I didn’t want him to see I rejected the request and then keep requesting to follow me. I decided I would follow that advice since it seemed like the easiest path.

Lately it feels as if we are warned more and more about what to put on our social media as potential employers can and will use your posts as a determining factor on whether to hire you. It never really occurred to me that my students, and possibly their parents, would be looking me up, too. It reminds me of a policy my teachers in high school had that even if we did friend request them, they wouldn’t accept the request until after we had graduated. In the case of my soccer coach/ history teacher, he used to tag my mom in photos of me so I could still see the posts.

I thanked God I had my profile set to private not public, and that even then I am careful with what I post. If I had one recommendation for new education students, it’s to set your profile to private so people must request to follow you and to still limit what you post. Your future students don’t need to see pictures of you at parties in college or drunk at a bar on your 21st.

This new idea of professionalism in the workplace may be a bit hard to get used to. It’s hard to see so many other college students freely posting and saying what they want to on Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat. They can post some of the fun memories we have with them that may be NSFW. I’m sure this part of adulting and learning what should be shared and what shouldn’t be is hard for everyone when they hit that point, but the issue for us as education majors is that transition happens as you are trying to figure out what college is and who you are as an adult. However, this idea of professionalism carries a different weight with it when you are an education major, especially one here at Marquette. Here at MU, we are blessed to enter the professional world a bit earlier than most, with opportunities for service-learning beginning freshman year.

So, while this may be a more serious topic than I usually post, I feel it is especially relevant as we move into times where our students could be trying to find our social media. Overall, social media can be a wonderful tool to connect us, to bring us to the latest ideas, and to share aspects of our lives. Yet when it comes to our lives as educators, it’s time to switch into private mode. Hopefully a few of you can learn from my story and won’t have to have an awkward interaction like that. If you do have something like this happen in the future, I hope you can face it head on, without the minutes of panic I seemed to have.

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Jennifer Orta

This year, we are spending time getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Jennifer Orta, one of our current M.S. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program!

IMG_4518I grew up in Aurora, Illinois, which happens to be a suburb of Chicago, as many of us are who are at Marquette. I went to undergrad here in the College of Arts and Sciences and graduated with my Bachelor’s in Psychology and Spanish for the Health Professions in May 2019. I am now getting my master’s degree in clinical Mental Health Counseling specializing in Children and Adolescents. So I’ve lived in Milwaukee for almost five years and most likely will stay here for a few years since I recently got engaged to my best friend and college sweetheart, René Martinez (Engineering, ’18).

I love talking about my family. My family means the world to me. I would not be here without them! Throughout my academic journey, my family has been nothing but supportive. My parents immigrated from Chihuahua, Mexico, in 1994 in search for a better life. They were not planning to stay for long, but then I came along and they realized the amazing opportunities I could have here. I have a younger brother, Salvador who is a senior in high school (I am trying really hard to convince him to come to Marquette!). My mom, dad, and brother are my inspiration and motivation to push through when times are tough.

My college experience has been different than what I expected. I am a first- generation college student. My parents were always and still are very supportive of my academic journey. I was a bit overwhelmed trying to figure out college applications and FAFSA, but my mom and dad were always there as support. I found a large community at Marquette of first-generation students. I found comfort in the programs and opportunities that were available at Marquette for students like me such as the Ronald E. McNair Scholar’s program that helped me conduct research in the Milwaukee community.

I currently am working at Ulta Beauty on the weekends and at the EDPL office. Come visit me for your makeup/skin care (IG: Jennymakeup96) or printing needs!

When I was looking for a master’s program, I was looking for three things: accreditation, fit, and social justice. I found all of those here! The College of Education prepares students with the knowledge and skills to excel in their fields. The college also prepares us to go into the world and fight for those who need a voice. I found my passion, working with the Latinx community, though the values that I learned here at Marquette. My ultimate goal in life is to create focus groups or support groups for children of immigrant parents. Our story is very unique and sometimes overlooked.

I am completing my second semester in the CECP master’s program. As part of the program’s and licensure requirement, I am completing my practicum and internship at Sixteenth Street Community Health Center. I am supervising an amazing woman and team of counselors who share my passion. My supervisor specializes in childhood trauma. It is difficult hearing the stories of children who have experienced trauma at such a young age. But seeing them flourish and grow makes it all worth it.

Advice that I would give to anyone in higher ed: DON’T GIVE UP! You are standing on the shoulders of giants who would move earth and sky to see you prosper. When times are tough, think about who you are doing this for… do it for yourself. You deserve it!

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Colleen Coveney

This year, we are spending time getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Colleen, one of our current sophomores!

I was born in Bartlett, IllIMG_7421.jpginois but spent the majority of my childhood in Carmel, Indiana. As a sophomore at Marquette, I have been in Milwaukee for about a year and a half, but it already feels like home. I grew up with my two loving parents, two brothers, and a couple of pets. Evan is 18 and will be going to an undetermined college next year, Liam is 14 and just started his Freshman year of high school. Additionally, I have a Golden Retriever named Franklin and a Siamese named Lulu. I am studying Secondary Education and Political Science here at Marquette.

My favorite educational experience was in a high school education class where my classmates and I ran a preschool. We were paired off in twos and assigned a week in which we were to choose a theme, plan a variety of lessons, and monitor the execution of the concept by the other high school students, who were teaching the lessons. Although my interest is not in early-childhood education, the opportunity to construct an entire week of lessons and activities was both challenging and extremely rewarding. To this day, my preschool teaching guides my own knowledge of lesson planning and collaborative educating. I am excited to continue to develop my experience as an educator and get a more tangible idea of high school teaching this year.

The Marquette campus and College of Education hold a very special place in my heart as a secondary home. From the moment I stepped onto campus, I fell in love with the gorgeous buildings, flourishing Milwaukee area, and amazing Marquette people. The glow of a campus sunset and the beauty of fall leaves in the Central Mall never cease to inspire me. However, the College of Education had an equally significant part to play in my own college decision. The opportunity to pursue multiple majors was a unique and important benefit of Marquette. In addition, the program includes placements in a classroom every semester which is imperative during the discernment and decision processes.

While my education is incredibly important to me, I also pursue many other activities on Marquette’s campus. During the week I work at the College of Nursing and play on my sand volleyball team. On the weekends, my friends and I enjoy Marquette Basketball games, visiting the lake, or exploring Milwaukee. The people and students that I get to meet and work with daily are what inspire me to continue to learn and develop as an educator.

Adventures in Student Teaching: International Edition

This fall, one of our elementary education pre-service teachers, Laine Dolan, is completing her student teaching in New Zealand. As part of this experience, she’s blogging about her time. Originally posted on her own blog, the following posts will chronicle along Laine’s adventures at Swanson School! 

downloadHello!

My name is Laine, and I am majoring in Elementary Education and Communication Studies at Marquette University. Over my four years at Marquette I have been in various urban and suburban classrooms in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I completed the first two months of my student teaching at a private urban school and am fortunate enough to finish the last half of student teaching in Auckland, New Zealand. Through St. Norbert College’s Global Teaching Program, I will be able to spend two months student teaching in a year one classroom in New Zealand. I am extremely excited for the incredible experience I will have in New Zealand.

Goals

  1. Go out of my comfort zone to make the most of my time.
  2. ​Experience the traditional New Zealand culture.
  3. Live as much like the kiwis as possible.
  4. Try all of the New Zealand food.

​Cultural Development Objectives​​

  1. Embrace new teaching styles and perspectives.
  2. Reflect on how to better my teaching style from what I learn in the NZ classroom.
  3. ​Buy into everything every day.

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Andy Holmes

This fall, we are continuing our series getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Andy Holmes, one of our doctoral students in the Educational Policy and Leadership Department and a clinical assistant professor/ educational specialist in the Physician’s Assistant program here at Marquette!

aholmesI am originally from Janesville, WI. After high school, I went to Valparaiso University for my undergraduate degree and National-Louis University for a Master’s in Education. I taught English in the Janesville school district for a while and then moved into a curriculum/ librarian/ innovation specialist position; I also coached drama, swim and soccer. I initially started working on my doctorate in 2015 after I learned about UW-Milwaukee’s Information Studies program at a conference. About a year later, I got a job at MSOE as an educational technologist, traveling back and forth from Janesville. In 2017, after my family moved with me to Milwaukee, I started working as a clinical assistant professor and education specialist here at Marquette in the Physician Assistant (PA) program. My wife and I have two children: a son who is starting high school this fall and a daughter who is in 10th grade at Brookfield East. They are on the debate and forensics teams together—and they assure me they’re going to be the state champs!

When I think about the year ahead, it’s often difficult to separate my work from my academic pursuits. I’m excited to be officially enrolled in the Educational Policy and Leadership department’s Ph.D. program. I feel like I have found my niche and I am passionate about the readings and topics, along with the Jesuit mission. The big draw for pursuing this degree was that in searching for a dissertation topic in information studies, I found myself continually circling back to education. Working in the PA program, I’ve recognized a pressing need for education specialists within healthcare. This degree marries my two disparate roles: I look forward to exploring ways in which I can innovate PA education.

Outside of the classroom, I love to ref soccer with my son—it’s a way of getting exercise and spending time with him. I enjoy reading with my daughter and going on walks with my family and dog. When I think about my family and their relation to my work, I have to say I am inspired by my wife. After my undergraduate experience, I graduated with a theatre degree, went back home and started working at a restaurant, where I met my wife. I started subbing in the local schools, and she encouraged me to get a teaching degree, then a Master’s… she always pushes me, challenges me. My wife works hard to make sure our family values are aligned with what is good and right in the world. She runs everything in our home: my kids and my wife are my reason for everything!

Teaching wasn’t my first-choice career. Somewhere along the line I’ve learned that I have an affinity towards nurturing people, to develop higher-order thinking, to see when students have those “a-ha” moments, and those sparks of inspiration. I just love knowledge and the transfer of knowledge. I’ve learned that I have a passion for social justice that I did not initially recognize in myself. I’m excited about the topics and EDPL’s social justice slant on education. I lean towards those topics and critical theory speaks to me. Most people can talk about a favorite teacher or subject, but when I think of my favorite educational experience, it’s paradoxical. It’s both the best and my least favorite life experience: the journey from high school teacher to higher education professor. It’s been both exceedingly difficult and wonderfully mind-blowing. I’ve learned there is so much possible in the world, and I’m excited to see what comes next.

Interested in learning more about graduate programs in the College of Education? Check out our website– or, better yet, come see us in person!

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Nelly Gilhooly

This fall, we are continuing our series getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Nelly Gilhooly, one of our undergraduate students in the College!

nelly gilhoolyMy name is Nelly Gilhooly, and I am a current freshman in the College of Education. I am studying Middle/Secondary Education and History. I grew up in Mount Prospect, IL, which is a small suburb of Chicago. I have never lived in Milwaukee before, and I am very excited to be here! Both of my parents work in a school environment. My mom is a first grade teacher, and my dad is a school engineer. I also have two sisters, one older and one younger than me.

My favorite education experience I have had was during high school. My Advanced Placement U.S. History (APUSH) teacher would show us crazy videos and songs at the beginning of each class to make my classmates and me excited to learn. This upcoming school year, I am very excited to learn more about something that is meaningful to me and learn about subjects I am passionate about. I was drawn to Marquette’s College of Education because I immediately loved the feeling I had here. I was very impressed by the connection the tour guides would make with each of the prospective students, and I also appreciated the hand written letters I would receive from the College of Education throughout the school year. My family also went to Marquette, so I am excited to be attending this school knowing how much this school has done for them.

This year, I am excited to go to sporting events and meeting other students at Marquette with similar interests as mine. I know by getting involved on campus, it will help me to make friends that will last my entire lifetime. Although I have only been here for a few weeks now, I would advise any new students to be outgoing and as social as you can be. You never know what you could miss out on! Do not be afraid to be yourself and enjoy the time you have. My inspiration for being an educator are my high school teachers. There was never a time where I felt uncomfortable or didn’t understand what was going on in class. They truly made my high school experience more enjoyable.


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