Archive for the 'Learning' Category

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Andy Holmes

This fall, we are continuing our series getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Andy Holmes, one of our doctoral students in the Educational Policy and Leadership Department and a clinical assistant professor/ educational specialist in the Physician’s Assistant program here at Marquette!

aholmesI am originally from Janesville, WI. After high school, I went to Valparaiso University for my undergraduate degree and National-Louis University for a Master’s in Education. I taught English in the Janesville school district for a while and then moved into a curriculum/ librarian/ innovation specialist position; I also coached drama, swim and soccer. I initially started working on my doctorate in 2015 after I learned about UW-Milwaukee’s Information Studies program at a conference. About a year later, I got a job at MSOE as an educational technologist, traveling back and forth from Janesville. In 2017, after my family moved with me to Milwaukee, I started working as a clinical assistant professor and education specialist here at Marquette in the Physician Assistant (PA) program. My wife and I have two children: a son who is starting high school this fall and a daughter who is in 10th grade at Brookfield East. They are on the debate and forensics teams together—and they assure me they’re going to be the state champs!

When I think about the year ahead, it’s often difficult to separate my work from my academic pursuits. I’m excited to be officially enrolled in the Educational Policy and Leadership department’s Ph.D. program. I feel like I have found my niche and I am passionate about the readings and topics, along with the Jesuit mission. The big draw for pursuing this degree was that in searching for a dissertation topic in information studies, I found myself continually circling back to education. Working in the PA program, I’ve recognized a pressing need for education specialists within healthcare. This degree marries my two disparate roles: I look forward to exploring ways in which I can innovate PA education.

Outside of the classroom, I love to ref soccer with my son—it’s a way of getting exercise and spending time with him. I enjoy reading with my daughter and going on walks with my family and dog. When I think about my family and their relation to my work, I have to say I am inspired by my wife. After my undergraduate experience, I graduated with a theatre degree, went back home and started working at a restaurant, where I met my wife. I started subbing in the local schools, and she encouraged me to get a teaching degree, then a Master’s… she always pushes me, challenges me. My wife works hard to make sure our family values are aligned with what is good and right in the world. She runs everything in our home: my kids and my wife are my reason for everything!

Teaching wasn’t my first-choice career. Somewhere along the line I’ve learned that I have an affinity towards nurturing people, to develop higher-order thinking, to see when students have those “a-ha” moments, and those sparks of inspiration. I just love knowledge and the transfer of knowledge. I’ve learned that I have a passion for social justice that I did not initially recognize in myself. I’m excited about the topics and EDPL’s social justice slant on education. I lean towards those topics and critical theory speaks to me. Most people can talk about a favorite teacher or subject, but when I think of my favorite educational experience, it’s paradoxical. It’s both the best and my least favorite life experience: the journey from high school teacher to higher education professor. It’s been both exceedingly difficult and wonderfully mind-blowing. I’ve learned there is so much possible in the world, and I’m excited to see what comes next.

Interested in learning more about graduate programs in the College of Education? Check out our website– or, better yet, come see us in person!

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Nelly Gilhooly

This fall, we are continuing our series getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Nelly Gilhooly, one of our undergraduate students in the College!

nelly gilhoolyMy name is Nelly Gilhooly, and I am a current freshman in the College of Education. I am studying Middle/Secondary Education and History. I grew up in Mount Prospect, IL, which is a small suburb of Chicago. I have never lived in Milwaukee before, and I am very excited to be here! Both of my parents work in a school environment. My mom is a first grade teacher, and my dad is a school engineer. I also have two sisters, one older and one younger than me.

My favorite education experience I have had was during high school. My Advanced Placement U.S. History (APUSH) teacher would show us crazy videos and songs at the beginning of each class to make my classmates and me excited to learn. This upcoming school year, I am very excited to learn more about something that is meaningful to me and learn about subjects I am passionate about. I was drawn to Marquette’s College of Education because I immediately loved the feeling I had here. I was very impressed by the connection the tour guides would make with each of the prospective students, and I also appreciated the hand written letters I would receive from the College of Education throughout the school year. My family also went to Marquette, so I am excited to be attending this school knowing how much this school has done for them.

This year, I am excited to go to sporting events and meeting other students at Marquette with similar interests as mine. I know by getting involved on campus, it will help me to make friends that will last my entire lifetime. Although I have only been here for a few weeks now, I would advise any new students to be outgoing and as social as you can be. You never know what you could miss out on! Do not be afraid to be yourself and enjoy the time you have. My inspiration for being an educator are my high school teachers. There was never a time where I felt uncomfortable or didn’t understand what was going on in class. They truly made my high school experience more enjoyable.

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Jasmine Babineaux

The College of Education is excited to continue allowing our readers to better know its faculty, staff and students. This week, we’d like to introduce you to Jasmine Babineaux, one of our graduate students in the Student Affairs in Higher Education program. Read on to get to know her better!

jasmineI was born and raised in Lafayette, Louisiana! I moved to De Pere, Wisconsin in 2015 to pursue by Bachelor’s Degree at St. Norbert College. I graduated this past May with a Bachelor of Arts in Writing and Business Management. I’ve been in Milwaukee for a full month now. My grandparents raised me from a baby! I have a 1 year old brother named Levi and a sister who’s 6 months younger than me.

I’m a Graduate Assistant in the Office of International Education. I have two favorite educational experiences: studying abroad in South Africa for a couple of weeks and in London for a semester. Also, attending the LeaderShape Conference the summer after my sophomore year of undergrad was a turning point in my personal growth. That experience still guides me to this day. For this academic year, I’m looking forward to brainstorming places to do my practicum experience!

My decision to attend Marquette was divinely ordained, honestly. I came to the Open House with a friend who is from Milwaukee and was planning on moving back here. One of the faculty members and current students sealed the deal for me. I felt seen and that I would get the most intentional graduate school experience from the SAHE Program that aligned not only with my professional aspirations, but also with my character. I have always loved Milwaukee, the richness of culture, and the big city aspect. I planned to move back to the south, but for some reason I was lead here.

Outside of the classroom, I perform my poetry and write social commentary, I take salsa dancing classes occasionally, collect plants & name them, spontaneous road trips, I host a podcast! Check out my podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Anchor: Respect Her Mind

My inspiration is my baby brother; my best friend, Jordan; my mom & grandparents; young people in general. Other inspirational figures are Ericka Hart and Elaine Welteroth – their work speaks to me in ways that I can hardly explain.

Racism On Our College Campuses: What Can We Do About It?

This post is excerpted from a post written by Dr. Ryan C. Warner (Class of 2019) that originally appeared on gradPSYCHblog.com as a part of the series, “CARED Perspectives,” developed by the APAGS Committee for the Advancement of Racial and Ethnic Diversity. Posts in this series  discuss current events and how these events relate to graduate students in psychology. If you are interested in reading more, please see Dr. Warner’s full piece and follow him on Twitter!

RCP_9005By Ryan C. Warner

Similar to the rest of society, colleges and universities are not immune to racial discrimination. With “Blackface” party incidents and “noose” hangings making news at numerous universities all over the country, racially underrepresented students face challenges beyond the academic scope of tests, papers, and projects.

As a current graduate student of color who has attended various predominantly white universities, I can attest to the fact that racial discrimination can be displayed covertly (e.g., microaggressions) or overtly. These incidences have a profound impact of an individual’s well-being, and can impact their retention and life satisfaction. But the main question is, “what can we do about it?”

At the individual level, we need to all stand up to racial injustice when it occurs. Silence is compliance and only encourages and enhances racial injustice in the world. Individuals of all backgrounds and skin colors should point out bigotry when they see it, which will ultimately create social awareness and bring light to these issues.

At the institutional level, university leaders should make systemic changes to enhance inclusivity for students of color. One example may include requiring that all students, faculty, and staff attend diversity training focusing on racial equality and inclusion. Additionally, ensuring that campuses have a bias incident report system in place can offer a resource for students to document their experiences of racial microaggressions, which may assist with providing evidence that these incidences do in fact exist. This documentation may be useful with further presenting evidence for the need of diversity resources and inclusivity programming.

For additional resources please visit:

Dr. Ryan Warner is a graduate of the College of Education’s Counselor Education Counseling Psychology doctoral program

Getting to Know Our Faculty: Meet Dr. Alie Kriofske Mainella

The College of Education is excited to continue allowing our readers to better know its faculty, staff and studentsDr. Alie Kriofske Maniella joins our faculty in the department of Counselor Education Counseling Psychology this fall. Read on to get to know her better!

alie-k-m-2019I was born in Milwaukee and lived in the lower level of a duplex on 68th and Center. When I was a little girl, I made five goals for myself that have stuck with me all my life: to join the peace corps, fall in love, make a record of music, write a book, and interact with a monkey. I have the last two left. When I got a little older, I decided I’d love to be a university professor and am so glad to get to realize that dream at Marquette University.

I have been working with people with disabilities since I finished my undergraduate degree and continued that work when I joined the peace corps after college. I have a partner named Tad (there’s the falling in love goal checked) who is a writer and two kids. My son Coen is 15 years old and my daughter Lucy is 11. We love travelling and music (Coen is named for Leonard Cohen and Lucy for Lucinda Williams). We just got a dog. His name is Petey, and he’s a beagle mix and a very tenderhearted dog.

I have always loved school, particularly when writing was involved. I was involved in the creative writing program at UW Milwaukee in my undergrad and love to write short stories in my free time. I was a Trinity Fellow here at Marquette University while I got my Master’s Degree and fell in love with the culture here. I am so happy to be back.

Aside from creative writing, I also am a musician; I write songs (there’s the make a record of my music task on my list, though it was a CD that I made in 2002). I also play the guitar and the ukulele; you can find me playing and singing on my front porch and various farmers markets, street festivals and open mic nights.

I am passionate about disability rights, sexual health education and the mixing of these two topics. I love talking to parents about how to talk to their kids about sexual health and willingly dole out advice to anyone who has questions, so feel free to stop by my office in the Schroeder Complex if you have been asked a hard question by a young person in your life and aren’t sure how to phrase the answer! I’m inspired by so many who have worked in the various intersecting fields that I work in:

  • Beatrice Wright for her pioneering work in framing disability as a positive challenge,
  • Ed Roberts for his advocacy for himself and others in the creation of Independent Living Centers in the US,
  • Sonya Renee Taylor for her poetry, art and activism in self love, and
  • of course Dr. Ruth.

I feel tremendously grateful for being invited to work, teach and research at Marquette University in the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology department in the College of Education.

Getting to Know Our Faculty: Meet Dr. Gabriel Velez

This fall, we’re excited to welcome four new faculty members to the College of Education! Please take a moment to meet Dr. Gabriel Velez, an assistant professor in the department of Educational Policy and Leadership. You can also catch up on our entire series getting to know faculty and students!

IMG_0728 (1)I grew up in New York City, right in the heart of Manhattan. I still love going back there to visit my family because it is such a diverse place displaying all of humanity’s challenges, accomplishments, and energy condensed into a dynamic, never-dull city. I have also spent time living in South America, where I taught middle and high school for five years. I was in Peru as a Jesuit Volunteer, and during those two years I met my wife, Catherine Curley, who is a Milwaukee native and Marquette alum. Ever since I first came to Milwaukee over a decade ago—a trip that included a tour of campus—I have loved the city and felt like it was a second home. I look forward to my wife and my raising our first son Ian, who was born this past February, as a Brewers fan and Milwaukeean.

I am excited by all the important work being done with local partners and communities in Milwaukee, such as President Mike Lovell’s focus on combating trauma and the Center for Peacemaking’s various projects. There are a lot of great opportunities to be involved in promoting resilience and working closely with community partners. I am particularly looking forward to supporting the Peace Works program and learning more about different communities by linking with the Office of Community Engagement.

Marquette has always drawn my interest as a Jesuit institution committed to social justice. For me, the College of Education embodies how these ideals have shaped my own life. I have a lot of experience with Jesuit formation between my high school education at Regis in New York City and my two years with the Jesuit Volunteer Corps in Peru. Being a person for others has played out in my own life through my role as an educator and in working on promoting education to address violence and its legacies.  Here in the College, the faculty, students, and culture is imbued with this sense of mission: transforming education to serve humanity with attentiveness to the dignity and well-being of all. More broadly, Marquette is deeply engaged in the Milwaukee community, and I look forward to being a part of this work as an active citizen-scientist in the city.

As a half-Colombian, I joke that coffee is in my blood. It is truly one of my passions and is connected to so many great experiences and moments in my life—from silent retreats in Peru, to incredible morning sunrises in the Amazon, to my favorite bagel shop in New York, and all the many people and places over the years where I have enjoyed a warm cup. Milwaukee is such a great city for coffee, and I look forward to creating many more of these memories hear at the Colectivos, Valentines, Stone Creeks, Brews on campus, and smaller local roasters and shops. Aside from good coffee, I love to be active and particularly to run, but with my recently broken foot, it may be awhile away before I am back out doing a 5K.

 

 

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Tyanna McLaurin

This fall, we are continuing our series getting to know our students! You can get to know more of our students and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Tyanna McLaurin, one of our Student Affairs in Higher Education graduate students and the Assistant Director of Service Learning at Marquette!

tyannaI was born and raised in Milwaukee, WI. I had the pleasure to going to a variety of schools when I was younger so I’m can adapt quickly to new spaces and I’m unafraid of change (well, somewhat). My favorite educational experience was living overseas as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer. While the experience was not part of a “formal education,” it was indeed a life changing time for me. I learned so much about community work. Much of what I learned stays with me today.

I’ve been out of school for a long time, so the start of every semester is exciting. I’m challenging myself to be open to growth and to do my best. I know I got this! I work as the Assistant Director of Service Learning. I love working in higher education and want to continue on this career track. The Student Affairs in Higher Education Program was attractive to me. I like the relationships I can build with faculty and the support of students.

Outside of the classroom, I do so much. I work with Milwaukee Film-Black Lens Program as the Community Outreach Coordinator. Milwaukee has the 9th largest film festival in the country and I get to spread the word within and among my networks about this gem. History, specifically, African/African American History, tends to be my inspiration for my work and passion. I’m never surprised by social unrest or ‘isms that plague American society. This was all foretold through history. I use history to remain knowledgeable and keep going.

Want to learn more about our graduate education programs? Head on over to our website for more information– or, even better, come visit us on campus!

 


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