Archive for the 'Stories from the classroom' Category

Alumna Carrie Hanson Named 2020 Herb Kohl Teaching Fellow

hansonCarrie Hanson, ‘Ed 14 and a social studies teacher at West Allis Central High School, has been named a 2020 Herb Kohl Teaching Fellow. The Kohl Teacher Fellowship “recognizes and supports teaching excellence and innovation in the State of Wisconsin.” Each year, 100 fellowship recipients and their schools each receive a $6,000 grant to help them pursue professional development or realize goals for their classrooms.

“I am so grateful for this opportunity and owe my gratitude to the many mentors who have guided me along my teaching path. So many of my first mentors were the educators I worked with at Marquette who helped me to see the bigger picture of teaching, which extends so much further than the walls of my classroom. To be intentional in my interactions with my students and my community, to give freely of my heart, to see the dignity in people even if they might not see it in themselves, those are some of the things that I think about when I try to reflect on what I learned at Marquette.”

Congratulations, Carrie!

Week 7: The End

Laine Dolan, an elementary education and communications studies student in the College of Education is spending part of her student teaching semester abroad. She is teaching at Swanson School in Auckland, New Zealand, and is blogging about her experience. This post originally appeared on Laine’s own blog

p121The time has finally come: the last week of student teaching in New Zealand is over. However, here is a recap of the final week of this incredible experience!

My class had been working hard at their play of The Rainbow Fish and finally got to perform it for some other classes on Monday. The costumes turned out adorable and the students read their lines very well! I think I might have a few future Broadway stars in my class.

The last week of school we also had a water day where the kids enjoyed soaking me with squirt guns and a huge slip ‘n slide was set up on a hill. Another student teacher and I may have enjoyed the slip ‘n slide more than our students! My class also created their own jandals (sandals) after we read the story Crocodiles Christmas Jandals. I also continued to share my passion of lacrosse with my kiddos as we had some chances to practice their skills more. Finally we ended the week with some well earned ice blocks (popsicles).

Oh! Don’t let me forget about the final assembly! There were awards, each year level sang songs, and most importantly… the American teachers put together a little something for the school. We also were lucky enough to be pulled on stage with the Pacifico group to try to learn their cultural dance moves. It is a Pacifico tradition to bring people into their culture by having them try the dance with them. It was quite the surprise to us to be pulled on stage again but we did our best!

It’s the people that really make the most impact on experiences in life. I am so grateful to have been places with Janet these past seven weeks. She has been so fun to work with and has helped me grow as a teacher in so many ways. On our final day, after the bell rang and school ended, all of us American student teachers headed to Bethells beach for one last afternoon hangout.

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I am so thankful for each and every person that I met while student teaching in New Zealand. There were countless people that went out of their way to make us all feel welcome. Lisa (a teacher at Swanson) hiked and got burgers with us the first weekend. Mike (a teacher) dedicated so much time to help us make traditional Maori bone carving necklaces. Hazel (a teacher and host of Sarah) took us hiking, kayaking, and snorkeling. Matt (a teacher) took us surfing. These are just a few of the numerous people that made this trip so special.

Most of all I am thankful for the girls asleep on the beach above. I could not have asked for a better group of girls to be stuck with every day for the past seven weeks. Sarah, Alee, Erin, Maddy, and I made so many memories this trip that I will never forget. I’m lucky to have four new best friends! See you all at St. Norbert College when I visit soon!

Thanks for following my blog!

The End.

Why is Cheese in America Orange?

Laine Dolan, an elementary education and communications studies student in the College of Education is spending part of her student teaching semester abroad. She is teaching at Swanson School in Auckland, New Zealand, and is blogging about her experience. This post originally appeared on Laine’s own blog.
downloadThink about it… milk is white… why do we have orange cheese in America?! I was mindblown when this idea was brought to my attention here in New Zealand. We were sitting in the staff room during morning tea chatting with a reliever (substitute teacher) when this was brought to my attention. She had lived in the United States for about five years in her teen years when her dad had moved there for work. We were talking about differences between the States and New Zealand. She explained the thing that confused her the most in the States was that we had bright orange cheese. At first I was confused by her comment because I’ve just grown up “knowing” cheese is orange. When you put a slice of cheese on your burger it’s bright orange, when you make Kraft Mac ‘n cheese and most kinds it’s bright orange, and if you buy a cheesehead in Wisconsin it’s bright orange! If someone asked me to draw a slice of cheese I would most likely draw it orange.
However, as I say that, I was perplexed by her comment and put it all together: cows make milk which makes cheese. Cows’ milk is white… so why and how is our cheese orange… Milk is never orange! I was dumbfounded. What are the cheesemakers of America not telling us?! So… I did some research to find the answer to this mystery that I had natural believed my whole life. According to a NPR article, certain breeds of cow had a natural yellow-orange pigment when they were being grass fed. Grass fed = greater quality cheese. Well cheese producers decided to make a little more money by skimming off the cream to make butter separately. However, this took away some of the color of the cheese. So they started to color the cheese to make it seem like it was still quality cheese. Then they started getting even more tricky and coloring it brighter and brighter orange because people believed it was greater quality the more orange. This started in England and was carried over to the States. And that is why our cheese is orange! It is indeed colored with dye! There is my spiel about cheese being orange because I was so rattled by the fact the cheese I had grown up with my whole life was not the same color as milk.

Now transitioning to school… school is still good! I have taken over the first blog which has primarily been reading and math. I have really enjoyed the freedom of planning and teaching here. There is not a strict curriculum so I can choose what I want to do and how I want to do it. My teacher I am working for has been really amazing to work with and has helped me grow a lot. Next week I will fully be taking over the classroom.

Over the weekend we drove up north to the Bay of Islands for a few nights. The beaches were incredible and the view was unbelievable. We went sailing on Saturday and enjoyed 6 hours on the water with the most amazing sights. Sunday we relaxed on the beach and enjoyed some good food. We then made our way home. I successfully drove on the left side of the road the whole way so that’s a win.

It has been the most incredible experience here and I cannot wait to see what else we explore!

Week 2: The Big Orange Box

Laine Dolan, an elementary education and communications studies student in the College of Education is spending part of her student teaching semester abroad. She is teaching at Swanson School in Auckland, New Zealand, and is blogging about her experience. This post originally appeared on Laine’s own blog

downloadI have officially been student teaching in New Zealand for two weeks now. I have loved my time so far and have learned so much from my cooperating teacher, class and school. I have finally started to get into the groove of things and am getting a hang of the schedule.

I mentioned briefly in my last post about how students at Swanson have a lot more play time than students in the US do. So here is the average day teaching in my Year 1/ Year 2 class at Swanson school:

Swanson Daily Schedule
9:00 – Learning Block 1 (2 hrs)
11:00 – 1st Break (40 min)
11:40 – Learning Block 2 (1.5 hrs)
1:10 – 2nd Break (40 min)
1:50- Learning Block 3 (1 hr)
2:55 – Dismissal

This totals to about 6 hours at school, 4.5 hours of learning blocks, and 1.5 hours of break/lunch time. In addition o the breaks, we frequently take breaks during learning blocks to take a lap or two jogging around the large bike path or playing a game. We also have fitness once a week where we do track and field activities for 40 minutes. My school I was just at in Wisconsin had 7 total hours at school and only a 20 minute recess and 20 minute lunch. Our brain breaks would be quick and limited because we were always inside. Another difference between Swanson and my school and most schools in the States is that when a students finishes a learning task at Swanson, they are usually free to play until it is time to move on to the next thing. Frequently, in the states when a students finishes a task, they are either directed to another task.

One of my biggest takeaways so far is that it is okay for students to just play sometimes. If they are getting their work done then they deserve some time to just play and be a child. A lot of learning and creativity happens through play, too.

I have learned over my time here that Swanson is a unique school in New Zealand. Not many schools have this much play time or free play (no rules) at breaks. If you have not checked out the tab of my blog about Swanson school, I highly recommend checking it out and watching the Free Play videos. Swanson has a unique policy of allowing kids to do whatever they please at breaks. Teachers are not allowed to say no and do not step in. I had not seen anything too crazy while on duty during breaks until this Friday when the big orange box arrived. This box was added to the field as storage for bikes, however, adventurous Swanson kids saw it as a great big climbing wall. I could not believe my eyes when I saw a herd of children climbing the box and standing on top. I even saw a kindergarten boy make it to the top of this box which was probably 12 plus feet off the ground. Although this was terrifying, it was also amazing to see the teamwork happening on this box. Older kids were helping younger kids make it to the top. I saw two 12-year-olds hoist up a 6-year-old boy while another 12-year-old grabbed him at the top and pulled him up. I also saw lines forming and kids patiently waiting for their turn to use the ladder they had dragged over from the hut building station in the trees. Anyways the big orange box was a wild experience to watch, but I can see a lot of benefits from letting children explore and learn from their own mistakes instead of an adult telling them no.

This week was a crazy week, but I loved every second of it!

On Friday I had a picnic with another American student teacher and her host family at Bethells beach. Never a bad day with food and a beach. On Saturday we ventured off to Waiheke Island and explored some beautiful vineyards. The views were incredible.

New Zealand has been good to me, and I can’t wait to explore it even more!

Getting to Know Our Alumni: Meet Jason Curtis

We’re excited to introduce you to one of our alumni, Jason Curtis, this week in our “Getting to Know… ” series focusing on students, alumni and faculty staff of the College of Education. You can catch up on all of our past features, but read on to learn more about Jason!

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Jason Curtis, along with two alumni currently teaching at Oconomowoc High School

I have been in the Milwaukee area since I started at Marquette in the fall of 2003, but I am originally from Leicester, MA. I live at home with my amazing wife, Pam and my feisty and loyal dog, Linus. My parents, all my cousins and extended family still live in Massachusetts.

Currently I am the Principal at Oconomowoc High School. I LOVE MY JOB. I love working with teachers; helping them be proud of their job and taking their crazy ideas and making them a reality. The biggest challenge is helping adolescents navigate through this challenging world. Between social media, vaping, and other life challenges…it’s hard to be a teenager. I am so excited about our school’s new vision and strategic direction. Our staff has worked hard to establish our identity and this year we are taking intentional steps to helping our students live that vision.

I LOVED my graduate school experience at Marquette. I enjoyed networking with other aspiring leaders from different schools and developing our leadership skills together. I still rely on their friendship, expertise and advice! My journey to Marquette and the College of Education is a long story…However, I knew I wanted to be a teacher, and I knew Marquette was the school for me- so it all just came together. When it came time to explore graduate programs, I couldn’t imagine looking anywhere else!

Marquette alumni bring the Jesuit values and social justice lens that defines the College of Education to students, families and communities across the city, state, country, and even the world. The College of Education understands their awesome responsibility to prepare each student to be not only a teacher, counselor, or educational leader, but an advocate for those in need, a voice to speak up with those who have been silenced, and a champion for those who have been marginalized. It’s incredible to think that the values of the college live within these teachers, counselors, principals, and district leaders. As a high school principal, my Marquette education guides my work everyday and I now seek out Marquette graduates to staff my school.

When I am not in school, I love to travel. It’s hard to escape from the day-to-day routine of being a principal. You truly serve a community, and it’s hard to shut it off and walk away. However, when I travel- I escape, recharge and sleep in! Don’t think of traveling as exotic and far distances…it can be as simple as experiencing a new place just miles away!

My students, past and present, inspire me. They inspire me to be a better leader, teacher and advocate.

Adventures in Student Teaching: International Edition

This fall, one of our elementary education pre-service teachers, Laine Dolan, is completing her student teaching in New Zealand. As part of this experience, she’s blogging about her time. Originally posted on her own blog, the following posts will chronicle along Laine’s adventures at Swanson School! 

downloadHello!

My name is Laine, and I am majoring in Elementary Education and Communication Studies at Marquette University. Over my four years at Marquette I have been in various urban and suburban classrooms in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I completed the first two months of my student teaching at a private urban school and am fortunate enough to finish the last half of student teaching in Auckland, New Zealand. Through St. Norbert College’s Global Teaching Program, I will be able to spend two months student teaching in a year one classroom in New Zealand. I am extremely excited for the incredible experience I will have in New Zealand.

Goals

  1. Go out of my comfort zone to make the most of my time.
  2. ​Experience the traditional New Zealand culture.
  3. Live as much like the kiwis as possible.
  4. Try all of the New Zealand food.

​Cultural Development Objectives​​

  1. Embrace new teaching styles and perspectives.
  2. Reflect on how to better my teaching style from what I learn in the NZ classroom.
  3. ​Buy into everything every day.

Getting to Know Our Alumni: Meet Jen Binneboese

This year, we are spending time getting to know our alumni! You can get to know more of our students, alumni, and our faculty/ staff on previous posts. Read on to meet Jen Binneboese, one of our teacher education alumni!

17968573081_36e5e9d841_bMy name is Jen Binneboese and I am a current school counselor at Washington Park High School in Racine, Unified School District.  I am from Island Lake, IL but have lived in the Milwaukee area since 1998 since transferring to Cardinal Stritch to finish my Bachelors Degree. I am the oldest of 4 siblings and am a First Generation college student. My family is spread across the United States, from Virginia to Oregon, which gives me a great excuse to travel! I have five nieces and nephews, which makes me an amazing aunt!

Working at Washington Park High School has been an opportunity I am so grateful to have. The diversity,  history of the school, the amazing staff, my support staff team are just a few of my favorite things about being a teacher there. There is never a dull moment within our school days which I love because it keeps everything exciting. Some challenges that I have experienced throughout my time there is that it is an urban, high needs school. Due to that, we have had declining enrollment which has meant cuts to my department. However, we went to a career academy model 4 years ago, which has been an exciting change!

My favorite educational experience was when I had a senior write an essay for a scholarship about someone who made a big impact on your life, that person being me. It was a truly touching experience and made me realize why I love this profession. One exciting opportunity I am looking forward to this upcoming academic year is that my role changed. While I continue to be the department chair, I do not have an assigned caseload of students this year. I am overseeing everything in my department and am acting as a Quasi Administrator this year. It is quite the shift, but time will tell how it goes!

I chose Marquette and the College of Education for various reasons. First and foremost, Marquette has a great reputation. I knew if I were to attend Marquette, I would be in great hands. Also, a friend of mine from my undergrad started attending Marquette and said many great things about the school. Outside the classroom, I love practicing my photography skills as well as travel. I love to explore new places and finding the beauty in the outdoors, specifically nature and architecture. My inspiration for working in education is my high school teacher. This teacher first sparked my interest for psychology. I worked briefly at an alternative school and decided to change my track from community to school counseling.


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