Archive for the 'Marquette University' Category

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Jordan Mason

This fall, we’ve been getting to know our students a little bit better. This week, we’re focusing on Jordan Mason, a first-year graduate student in the College. Want to catch up with our other students? Check out our entire series!

jordanMy name is Jordan Mason, and I am pursuing a Master’s degree in Education, focus in Student Affairs in Higher Education (SAHE). I am a member of the first-year cohort. I grew up in Holmen, Wisconsin, 20 minutes north of La Crosse on the western side of Wisconsin. This will be my fifth year living in Milwaukee, as I attended Alverno College – another institution of higher education in Milwaukee – for my undergraduate degree.

My family is a fabulous support system! Growing up, I lived with my parents and two younger brothers, Dylan and Gavin. They now attend Viterbo University in La Crosse. My favorite education experiences were my two study abroad experiences! In the fall of 2016, I participated in Semester at Sea, a program in which students travel to 14 different countries via shipboard travel. In addition, this past summer I was able to travel to Poland, Sweden, and Denmark as part of a short-term study abroad class titled Coastal Cities: The Baltic Sea. This academic year I am excited to engage with the students in my cohort – learning from their backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives.

Marquette was on my list of schools I hoped to attend for my undergraduate degree, but I was unable to attend. When I found out Marquette had a SAHE program, it rose to the top of my list of graduate schools. Furthermore, the theory-to-practice model and the cohort model truly impressed me. I also felt right at home when I visited campus; I knew Marquette was the university for me!

Traveling is my favorite activity outside of the classroom, even if time only allows day trips. I feel there is so much to learn from other places and the people to live there. My best advice is to put away your spare change when saving to travel. It might not seem like that much on a daily basis, but when it is counted after a longer period of time, it adds up to a good chunk of travel money!

My inspiration for pursuing a degree in Student Affairs is actually my undergraduate self. My undergraduate experience was incredibly transformative for me; I explored my identities more deeply and endured life changing events. I was able to persist through college and excel due to the support I received from Student Affairs professionals at Alverno College. I hope to support students through their journeys, just as I was supported through mine.

Interested in learning more about Student Affairs in Higher Education or any of our other graduate programs? Head on over to the College of Education’s website for more information!

 

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Oscar Silva

Meet Oscar Silva, one of our outstanding graduate students. We’ve been featuring out students all semester long– catch up with them today! 

KAR_9785My name is Oscar Silva. I am in the Education Policy and Leadership Educational Administration program and should graduate next year with my master and principal’s license. Currently, I am an English teacher at Ronald Reagan High School and a graduate assistant for the Office of Intercultural Engagement.

I was born and raised in this great city right across the bridge. Growing up on the south side we would always see Marquette as an intriguing yet out of reach school, so it’s a bit ironic that I’m here now. My parents moved us to Kenosha in 2001, but I moved back in 2012 because I wanted to teach in an environment in which I felt comfortable. My immediate family is small, only five of us, but my extended family is big, probably over 100! It’s almost impossible to go anywhere in the south side and not see a family member.

My favorite educational experiences all revolve around collaboration. I love working with people who can expand my knowledge or people who can help me chisel away at my thoughts. I traveled a different journey than most, so I know that I still have a lot learn. Meeting the people in my cohort has to be my latest favorite memory. Our program is cranking out some wonderful administrators and educators. I’m looking forward to taking over the school system with them!

This year, I’m looking forward to finishing strong. I love learning and love the academic environment, but I need a break. I’ve been going to school for 24 of my 29 years, and I want to get my Ph.D., but I need a small break so I can continue with vigor. If all goes well I will be a principal somewhere in Milwaukee, but I need to focus on the remaining three classes I have left.

I was drawn to the College of Education because of the rigor of the coursework and Dr. Ellwood. I researched other programs around the city and programs online looking for a curriculum that would challenge me. I wanted not only rigor, but courses that would help me understand the role of a principal and how to juggle the many hats that come with that position. Our unnamed competitors did not have courses I felt would challenge me and/or courses I felt were essential for working in Milwaukee. Online was also never an option. I knew I wanted to go to Marquette when I saw the curriculum. Once I met Dr. Ellwood, the decision was solidified. She has been my guardian angel throughout this entire process. Knowing that I have her support makes me work harder to let her know that the trust she has invested in me is worth it.

In my free time, give me good music, good food, and good company and I’m set. Learning is my hobby. I love to travel to learn, read to learn, laugh to learn, etc. Yet, I do love being in the classroom. As a high school teacher, no one day is like the one before, so I am always experiencing something new. Plus, my students are a riot. After a day teaching, my classes at Marquette can feel like therapy. I am able to discuss in depth the issues that are affecting my students and apply the new knowledge immediately the next day. So the classroom really is my safe haven.

My inspiration stems from my grandparents. I was really close with my paternal grandparents and my grandpa is my greatest inspiration. He brought his family from Mexico with nothing but his work ethic. He would always speak so highly of me to everyone, and I want to prove him right. I want to extend his American dream.

Are you interested in pursuing a Masters Degree and/ or Principal licensure? We have just the program for you! Head on over to our website to learn more!

Where Are Our Alumni? Catching Up With TJ Bongiorno

In this #ThrowbackThursday post, we catch up with one of our alumni who participated in an undergraduate version of our Masters in STEM Teaching program, TJ Bongiorno.

tjI currently work in Illinois High School District 201 (J. Sterling Morton West High School) teaching sophomore and junior level integrated mathematics courses. I grew up in Brookfield, IL, which is about 20 minutes west of Chicago. I have been married for a little over a year to my high school sweetheart and currently do not have any children. My parents still live in the area and my only sibling – a brother – lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

My favorite educational experience has to be the consistency in which my job is different! I know that sounds like an oxymoron but it’s true! Teaching, unlike other professions, gives you a different experience every single day. The changing classes, age groups, etc. gives you an opportunity to impact many different lives in many ways. The Noyce Program allowed me more in classroom experience that definitely helped prepare me for what to expect in my own classroom. Also, the individualized courses that were offered through the Noyce Program were excellent since I was able to spend more time with a professor who was also currently a high school teacher.

In my free time, I love watching and playing baseball and hockey. I have coached baseball at the junior varsity high school level and intend on continuing to do so for as long as I can. If you do work in a school, get involved somehow. Start a club or become sponsor to a club, get students excited about being in school!

I would say my inspiration for my work is my high school math teacher, Mr. Steve Yurek. He was someone who always made (sometimes a boring subject) interesting and fun. He is someone I have kept in contact with in order to grow in my profession.

Interested in learning more about how you can pursue your Masters Degree and Wisconsin Teaching Licensure in just fourteen months? Our Noyce Scholars graduate program is accepting applications through February of 2019!

 

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Beth Tinsley

We’re continuing our blog series Getting to Know Our Students this week by featuring Beth Tinsley. Want to learn more? Check out the entire series and previous posts!

My name is Beth Tinsley. I am a third-year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology program. I am originally from Rockford, Illinois, but when I started my program, I moved to the Milwaukee area and currently call Brown Deer home. I moved just before starting this program, so I’ve been a Milwaukeean for about three years.

My family is a little complicated, but whose isn’t, right?! I’m the only child from my parent’s marriage and the oldest of four children from my dad’s other marriages combined. I’m also a caregiver for my aging grandparents who have a number of health issues, so I live with them to help out.

I was drawn to Marquette and the College of Education because I loved the personalized attention that I received from the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology (CECP) department, starting all the way back to the Graduate School’s Open House, through the application and interview process, all the way through to notification of acceptance. I was geographically limited for where I applied, and then once I started interviewing it all became about fit and connection. Marquette felt like a great fit!

Outside of the classroom, I love to travel, bake, watch movies, read, and do crafty things. Many times these passions overlap, so for example, I am often traveling short distances to check out new bakeries. To me, staying active in Milwaukee helps me not only know the community and have the scoop on great treats, but it gives me a little balance in the midst of a challenging academic curriculum. Get out in Milwaukee and explore! If you need suggestions, let me know!

My passion for coming back to school came from being a caregiver for my grandparents. Taking them to doctors’ appointments where their mental health was brushed aside or dismissed as “getting old” was frustrating to say the least. I initially returned to school with the intention of going into geropsychology with the desire to effect change at the policy level of healthcare. I still have a passion for geropsychology and recognize the needs of that particular population, but I have expanded my interest to incorporate adults at a general level, leaving room for further definition in time.

Prior to returning to the classroom, I worked in Student Affairs for 12 years. I held roles as the director of residence life, director of student activities, director of community service, first-year advisor, and dean of students for a few different small, private liberal arts colleges and universities in the Midwest. I love musical theater, and I volunteer at Feeding America’s warehouse.

Interested in learning more about our Counseling Psychology Doctoral Program? Or any of our graduate degrees? Head on over to our website to check them out!

 

Getting to Know Our Students: Meet Sarah Crosby

This fall, we’re running a series getting to know students from all our programs in the College of Education. This week, meet Sarah Crosby, a graduate student from the great state of Illinois. And, catch up with all our other students on the blog!

crosbyMy name is Sarah Crosby, and I have the privilege of being a first-year student in the Student Affairs in Higher Education (SAHE) program in the Educational Policy and Leadership department here at Marquette. My role at Marquette–besides that of a graduate student– is as a Graduate Assistant for the College of Education. As I was researching for graduate programs I knew after spending five years in Kansas completing my undergraduate work that I wanted to be closer to home. I am originally from Rockford Illinois,  but I’ve recently relocated to Milwaukee for my graduate degree. However, I would consider Wisconsin to be a central part of my life; for the last twenty years my family and I  have spent the majority of our time in Green Lake, Wisconsin. Besides spending time in Green Lake, my family and I are  huge K-State fans. My family plays a central role in my life, and I am so excited to be close to them again!  When I am not doing school work or my Graduate Assistantship, I love to spend time with my family, being outdoors, working out,  watching K- State sports, and watching old classic tv shows.

As I was researching graduate programs, I was looking for somewhere that was closer to home but — most importantly — had a mission of family and serving others in a holistic approach. Consequently, when I arrived on Marquette’s campus for SAHE’s interview day in February, I instantly felt the family feel that I was looking for, especially in the College of Education. I felt like the faculty and staff I intermingled with really cared about me as an individual and not just a number. That has continued to play out as I am now officially a Marquette student! With that being said, I am incredibly excited for the opportunities that the SAHE program and my  Graduate Assistantship will entail these next two years.

Interested in learning more about SAHE at Marquette? Check out our website for all the details; we’re now accepting applications for next year’s cohort!

 

 

Where Are Our Alumni? Catching Up With Thess Dobbs

In this #ThrowbackThursday post, we catch up with one of our alumni who participated in an undergraduate version of our Masters in STEM Teaching program, Thess Dobbs. Currently teaching at Milwaukee School of Languages, Thess was recently awarded the Edyth Sliffe Award for Distinguished Teaching in Middle School and High School. Read on to hear more about what she’s been doing since graduating!

thessI teach high school math at Milwaukee School of Languages (MSL). At MSL I also lead the math club, which I started in 2014. In this club, we work on more challenging math that goes above and beyond the standard curriculum. Our students have the opportunity to wrestle with challenging competition-level problems and receive guidance to help them build their skills. Through fundraising we make all activities free or low-cost for our students, and we are proud to make these opportunities, often reserved for privileged students at elite schools, accessible to our students. The racial disparities in the STEM fields begin with the inequities in our school systems, and the process to end those disparities must also start with our schools.

Originally, I am from Milwaukee and grew up with a lot of brothers and sisters. My dad is a professor, and both my parents placed a strong emphasis on learning. Being a big sister made me a natural teacher. The Noyce Program gave me more hands-on experience than the typical pre-service teacher has. It wasn’t until student teaching that I really had to learn how to manage a classroom, but the relationships built during my field placements helped me maintain my confidence during the hard times later on. Thanks to the amount of time spent in field placements, I also got a good sense of the school culture of a few different schools.

Even though we aren’t in touch as much as we used to be, I feel the bond still exists between the Noyce Scholars in my cohort. All the formative experiences we shared as undergraduates are not easily forgotten. One person who inspires me is my grandma, Leona Sherrod, who passed away three years ago. She taught in public school for eighteen years, and taught for eighteen more years in prisons’ adult education programs. Though she is gone now, I’m glad she got to see me become a teacher too.

Interested in learning more about how you can pursue your Masters Degree and Wisconsin Teaching Licensure in just fourteen months? Our Noyce Scholars graduate program is accepting applications through February of 2019!

Becoming a Social Studies Teacher

This post originally appeared on Dr. Gibson’s Medium page.

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“painting of man” by Aarón Blanco Tejedor on Unsplash

By Melissa Gibson

The other night, I had an anxiety dream. In it, I was conducting research at an international school on its approach to civic education (you know, part of what I do in real life). My host was a teacher I know well, with whom I’ve worked in Peru. But before I could get started, he said I needed to meet with the principal. I entered her office, where another social studies teacher was waiting; across from us, the principal sat at her large desk, her head slung down while she napped. Worst nightmare of a job interview EVER.

Eventually, the principal jolted awake and leered at both of us. Our college transcripts were in front of her. She inspected each, and then looked at us with disgust: “Why would I hire YOU, either of you, to teach social studies when you do not even have good survey history courses on your university transcript? How can you even pretend to be social studies teachers?!” The other woman, who was clearly interviewing for a teaching job at the school, began to explain how her high school offered a plethora of college-level survey courses, and so when she got to college, she was able to move into advanced history seminars. She showed off her flashy knowledge of dates and names, and then went down a wormhole about some 1800s Navy admiral she was obsessed with. She ended with a summary of her students’ AP scores for the past twenty years. The principal nodded, clearly assuaged.

Then she turned to me. “What about you, little miss interdisciplinary?”
I gulped. I began my usual explanation of what it means to have studied Women’s Studies as an undergraduate, the various social science lenses on the same questions. I showed her on my transcript the “surveys” of sociology, history, literature, political science, but how they were all focused on questions of gender. And as I explained what I had studied, I grew more animated in my explanations of how I study these topics. The principal seemed unimpressed.

Gathering steam, I tried to give a narrative of how I came to this place in my intellectual career: I talked about not seeing myself in the curriculum (or in my classmates) and seeking academic spaces that honored the questions I was asking as legitimate intellectual inquiry. I talked about questioning dominant narratives, and moving back and forth between the various disciplinary cannons and critical theorists and scholars. I talked about my discovery late in life of how thrilling history can be when it is more than a collection of dates and names. I may have shown her the syllabus to my methods courses. I definitely showed her the documentaries and podcasts and blogs that my students have written in my social studies classes.

Eventually, she relented, agreeing that while my training was non-traditional, I clearly knew how to ask questions and get students to do some work (there may have been a tirade about lazy millenials and the ills of technology). She looked about to nod off for a nap again (and I really wanted to ask a snide question about what work she did if she spent so much time napping), so I mustered the courage to ask permission to conduct my research, which she granted. The next thing I knew, the dream had morphed into a murder mystery complete with chupacabras, and instead of conducting research on civic education, I was helping high school students escape some murderous blob-ghost thing, which liked to strike during football games. Also, there were rickshaw rides and a lack of child care for my own children so…definitely an anxiety dream.

School is finally back in full swing here in Milwaukee, and we are hunkering down at Marquette to dig into the meat of our courses. And on the eve of these intellectual journeys, I guess my sub-conscious needed to pause to reflect on what it means to be a scholar of social studies education, especially when one isn’t a traditional social scientist or historian. I talked my own imposter syndrome down in the dream, as evidenced by the principal’s relent, but I woke up aware of that always present feeling of self-doubt. Which, believe it or not, is important for me to hold onto. Not because it’s a valid self-critique but because it reminds me of how my pre-service teachers may feel in my methods courses and in their placements—not quite the real deal. And that self-doubt can be paralyzing. Part of my job as their methods instructor is to help them see the multiple ways that we can become scholars of teaching, and that our most powerful intellectual tools are the questions we ask.

This publication, which we will add to throughout the school year, is a record of their journeys learning to ask good questions. Along the way, they will uncover resources, stories, places, and instruction that just may help you become a better social studies teacher, too—whether this is your first year teaching, or your fortieth.

This is social studies. Not a collection of dates and names, but a way of inquiring about the world. We hope you’ll join us on our journey.


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