Archive for the 'Marquette University' Category

Getting to Know Our Students… Meet Katherine Lubar

This fall, we’re excited to get to know our students better, and we hope you are, too! Read on to meet Katherine Lubar and learn about her background and passion for clinical mental health.

Katherine LubarI am in my second year of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling master’s program. I grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and went to undergrad at Creighton University in Omaha, NE. I also spent a semester abroad in France during undergrad and worked in Denver with a ministry serving homeless youth for a summer. I moved to Milwaukee in the fall of 2017 to start grad school at Marquette.

My parents still live in Minnesota, and my older brother and his wife live in Milwaukee. My brother, sister-in-law, and I are all in grad school at Marquette this year!

This academic year, I have an internship in a counseling center at another college this semester as part of my master’s training. It is exciting to be able to apply the knowledge and skills I’m learning in my courses and further develop as a counselor through my internship experience.

I chose the College of Education and Marquette because I love the focus on social justice, advocacy, and multiculturalism within the College of Ed and how these are strongly incorporated into every aspect of the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology programs. The sense of community within the department and the support for students from faculty and staff also drew me to Marquette’s program.

In my free time, I love running, biking, yoga, and other sports, and I enjoy reading, cooking, and sewing when I have extra free time.  I also love spending time with friends and family and traveling as much as possible!

 

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Zachery Cramer

As we continue our series getting to know our students a little better this fall, we’d like to introduce you to Zachery Cramer, one of our SAHE students! And, check back to meet more students each week right here!

DSC_1325My name is Zachery Cramer, and I am a second-year graduate student in the Student Affairs in Higher Education Program (SAHE)!

I was born and raised in central Illinois — Princeville, IL, to be specific. I’ve been slowly moving north over the years as my undergraduate degree is from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL, where I studied Hospitality and Tourism Management.

I’ve lived in Milwaukee for a year and a month now! I live on the eastside and about a 5-minute walk from Bradford Beach. It’s definitely a nice change of pace after basically living in a corn field for 22 years.

My dad is a farmer and mechanic, and my mother is a Special Education Aide for middle schools. My younger sister just graduated high school and has been accepted to cosmetology school (so exciting!). Over the last several years, our family has become more dynamic as they have started to foster, and we have welcomed several dozen little ones in and out of our family.

My favorite educational experiences have been through my graduate program. There have been multiple courses where I lacked confidence in the topic areas, but our professors have done an amazing job in challenging my peers and me. Thanks to their work and belief in me, I feel like I’ve become more confident in my academic work and my capacity for engaging in new content.

This year I am serving as the Alumni Relations Chair for the Graduate Organization for Student Affairs in Higher Education (GO SAHE). I’m stoked to be able to engage with our alumni network from the SAHE program to serving as mentors, resources, and more for our current students. I’ll also start job searching in the spring, but I’m not too excited for that process yet.

I work a lot. I have a Graduate Assistantship (GA) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where I serve as the Riverview GA and the Leadership Programs GA. There, I supervise Resident Assistants, help to oversee a building of 150 students, and facilitate leadership programs for all of campus, from individuals to student organizations. This semester I am doing my graduate internship through the Marquette Student Wellness Center where I supervise the office assistants, work with our marketing and social media, and assist with other programming that comes out of our office.

A hobby that I have gotten into over the last year is running outside. I’ve become a snob where running inside is no longer enjoyable, and I need to be outside in the fresh air. This semester I plan on running three 5Ks! The Panther Prowl (UWM), Homecoming 5K (Marquette), and Hustle for Hearing (NIU). Running has been a very calming way for me to get outside and exercise while also allowing me to decompress after a long day/week.

I’ve also started “reading” audiobooks. Thanks to OverDrive (a super helpful app to check out) I can register my Milwaukee Public Library card. It allows me to check out books for a week at a time and listen while I’m commuting back and forth from Marquette to UWM to home. Just in August and September I finished seven books. If you have recommendations for good dystopian books, please let me know!

I really want to be able to support students as they go through their collegiate careers. When I was an undergraduate student I changed my major six times and never felt like I belonged in the classroom. It was thanks to student affairs professionals that I felt connected to the campus and the activities in which I was engaged. Thanks to these experiences and professionals, I now know that I am in the right place and doing the work that I’m meant to do.

I want to give a shout-out to some of my cohort members! Without them and the connections and experiences we have, graduate school would have been ten times harder than it already is. When I first decided to come here I was worried about being queer at a Jesuit institution, but I’ve felt supported the whole time I’ve been here! For those cohort members that work with me, thank you for making sure my work is quality and supporting me when I needed help. For those that share identities with me, thank you for helping to make being queer at Marquette possible. For those that meet up with me every Sunday for coffee, crying, and reading, thank you for always being willing to stay on topic (or completely veer off track).

 

Catching up with Courtney Farley

After completing student teaching last January, Courtney Farley finished out the rest of the academic year as a long-term substitute. However, with the new school year beginning, so is her new adventure! Courtney will be spending the next year teaching English in Spain. Read on to hear all about it.

farleyBy Courtney Farley

I grew up in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. I attended Queen of Apostles grade school, Catholic Memorial High School, and then found myself at Marquette. I have one sister, who graduated from Madison last year in biology and is now doing an accelerated nursing program at Madison. My mom works for Sherwin Williams in sales and my dad is a retired lawyer and now loves spending his days golfing. Finally, we have our dog, Guinness, who is a mini golden doodle and easily the family favorite.

I have been attending Marquette Basketball games ever since I could walk. My dad went to Marquette and so did a lot of my cousins, aunts, and uncles. I grew up surrounded by people who loved Marquette and I knew that there was no other college that I wanted to go to. I came into Marquette knowing I wanted to major in Spanish, but not knowing what I wanted to do with it. I have worked at a summer day camp every summer since high school and knew I loved working with kids. I transferred into the College of Ed my sophomore year and absolutely loved all the classes I was taking. The class size and relationships I have formed with my peers and with the professors are incredible and that is what I love most about the College of Ed. You truly feel valued and your professors want you to succeed and help you as much as they can.

Someone who has been an inspiration to me and has made a huge impact is my high school Spanish teacher, Señora Diedrich. She was so passionate about teaching Spanish and made me realize how much I love it. She created a classroom environment where we felt like family and weren’t afraid to make mistakes. She cared about each of her students and helped us along the way. I hope to make as big an impact on my students as she did on me.

I had such an amazing experience during my student teaching at St. Anthony’s in Milwaukee. I was placed in a third-grade classroom with an amazing cooperating teacher. Student teaching can be very nerve-racking those first couple weeks, but everyone at the school made me feel welcome and part of the St. Anthony family. My cooperating teacher always explained everything and always asked for my input and reflections on lessons. Taking over teaching and getting to use all that I learned at Marquette was awesome. Not only did I get to see what really worked in my classroom, I got to grow and learn through those lessons that didn’t go as smoothly. I was lucky enough to get to stay at St. Anthony after student teaching and take over a 4th grade class as a long-term sub. I continued to learn so much about myself and realized how passionate I was about teaching.

I am going to be in Spain teaching English to kids from ages 3-18. I am going through a program that allows me to pull out small groups of children to help them learn English. I just took an online class and got my TEFL certification. I am excited to put everything I learned from the class into practice. I will be living in a small city outside of Barcelona called Vilafant.

While I am in Spain, I will be staying with three different host families. I chose this program partly because I wanted to stay with a host family. I am excited to become a part of their family and live a true, authentic Spanish lifestyle. I am so excited to get to learn more about the Spanish culture and what it means to make Spain my new “home.”

I am also excited to continue to grow as an educator and see what other school systems are like outside the United States and how I can bring back what I learned abroad and implement it in my own classroom.

I don’t know anyone else doing the program. I am going over there and am a little nervous about not knowing anyone, but more excited for the possibility to meet so many new people. This will force me out of my comfort zone and allow me to learn more about myself. I’m excited for the chance to teach abroad and to learn from the people in Spain gets me excited when I think about it. I will be in a whole new country, but I will still be doing what I love, which is teaching, working with children, and experiencing new cultures.

 

 

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Brooke McArdle

We are continuing our blog series Getting to Know… Our Students this week with Brooke McArdle. Brooke is a sophomore in our teacher education program studying secondary education, history, and classical languages. Read on to learn more about Brooke!

mcardleI have spent the majority of my life in Brookfield, Wisconsin. My parents have had the biggest impact on my life, instilling values of compassion and service to others in both my brother and me. With service as the cornerstone of my life, my family was not surprised when I was called to be a teacher.

My favorite educational experience was participating in “Vocare” which was a two-week service immersion program during my senior year of high school. I had the privilege of spending my two weeks at St. Margaret Mary School working with the 5K class. I learned so much about teaching and about myself in those two weeks, and I am extraordinarily grateful to have had that opportunity.

This year I have applied for both the public health Global Brigades trip to Ghana as well as a Marquette Action Program (MAP) trip for which I do not know where I will be serving. I am very excited to hear if I have been selected for these opportunities. In Ghana, I would be educating a community about proper sanitation and helping to build facilities for them. Hopefully I will be selected for a MAP trip that involves education at a variety of sites around the United States.

I chose Marquette because of its Jesuit mission and the emphasis it places on service to others. Similarly, I was drawn to our College of Education because I knew that I wanted to be a part of the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) community.

When I am not in the classroom, I enjoy playing my violin and cello as well as baking, playing soccer, or having fun with family and friends. Music has helped shape me and has taught me so much. I think that everyone should have the opportunity to get involved with the arts, regardless of age or ability. My advice about playing violin or cello would be: stick with it because eventually you will go from playing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” to performing an incredible symphony!

My inspiration for being a teacher would be my parents as well as all the incredible teachers I have had before college because they have all had an impact on me in some way. My Latin teacher in high school and all of my high school History teachers, in particular, have sparked a fire in me that has made me very passionate about History and Latin. Also, my parents have always supported my desire to teach and have never tried to hold me back from pursuing my dream.

Getting to Know… Our Students! Meet Ryan Warner

Last spring, we got to know our faculty and staff right here on our blog! With the new semester, changing leaves, and fresh faces on campus, we wanted to take the time to introduce you to some of the students working to make a difference here in the College of Education. Read on to learn more about one of our doctoral students, Ryan Warner!

RCP_8918Ryan Warner is a fourth-year Counseling Psychology PhD candidate at Marquette University. He is currently completing his doctoral internship in Washington, DC as an active duty psychology resident within the United States Air Force.

 

Where did you grow up?

My hometown is Chicago, IL. I completed my bachelor’s degree at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Community Health-Rehabilitation and received a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I lived in Milwaukee for 3 years.

What’s your family like?

I come from a large and supportive family who promote love and education.

What is your favorite educational experience?

My favorite educational experience occurred during my masters program when I realized the path I wanted to take for my future career. Having conversations with faculty and staff regarding my aspirations of one day being a psychologist served as a catalyst for my decision to pursue a doctoral degree.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am excited to grow as a military officer and clinician during my psychology residency. Having opportunities to complete rotations in outpatient mental health, clinical health psychology, primary care integration/consultation, neuropsychological assessment, and substance abuse will expand my competence and skillset as a practitioner. Additionally, my role as a Captain and leader is assisting with both my personal and professional growth.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Ed?

I was particularly excited to attend Marquette because of the prestige and strength of the university and counseling psychology doctoral program. Additionally, the research of faculty directly aligned with my interests, and I was eager to embody the mission of excellence, faith, leadership, and service.

What do you like to do when you are outside of the classroom?

Outside of the classroom I enjoy traveling, exercising, watching movies, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends. These activities help re-energize me and provide balance in my life when my workload seems to be overwhelming. Taking time for myself helps to improve my well-being and overall happiness.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

My inspiration for my work and passion is fueled by my purpose in life. I am passionate about making individual, institutional, and systemic change within the organizations I serve. I plan to assist with promoting diversity and inclusivity within higher education institutions, while also working to mitigate the stigma of mental health throughout communities. My passion drives everything I do.

 

Welcome, Dr. Lee Za Ong

leeza-ong-2018Dr. Lee Za Ong has joined the Counselor Education Counseling Psychology this fall and will be working extensively with our new Rehabilitation Counseling Masters Degree. We had a chance to speak with Dr. Ong to get to know her better!

Where did you grow up? How long have you lived in Milwaukee?

I was born and grew up in Malaysia. I went to Japan for my undergraduate and came to the US for my graduate degrees. I have lived in the US longer than I lived in Malaysia and have been in Milwaukee for 10 years. Before coming to Milwaukee, my family has lived in New York and California and driven across the country twice due to several job relocations.

What is your favorite educational experience?

When students actively engage in class discussion and add on to my ideas.

What do you see as an exciting opportunity for this upcoming academic year?

I am doing a research project with Dr. Enaya Othman and other colleagues here at  Marquette University. This project focuses on investigating the stigma of disabilities among Muslim women in Milwaukee. I would also like to expand my research project regarding individuals’ attitude toward disability among other ethnicity in Wisconsin or in the nation.

What drew you to Marquette and the College of Education?

The faculty members in the Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology department are diverse, selfless, and engaging with the community. They are collective and are very skilled in lifting up people’s spirits. They are also a group of caring professors who are responsive to students’ needs.

What do you enjoy doing when you are outside of the classroom? 

I have been a board member of IndependenceFirst since 2014, and it has been an honor to be able to promote inclusion and the independent living of individual with disabilities. I have two children in high school and enjoy watching their musicals, band and swim events.  I admire young people’s talents and how they give everything into doing what they love. I hope that the world will be a better place with these passionate students. I also like to build relationship with people who are from different backgrounds. Their life experience and wisdom enhance my personal and professional development. An example could be the stories I listen to on The Moth podcast. The true stories that were told by people in the live show make me cry, laugh and feel in awe during my commute.

Any advice for readers who are interested in learning more?

The quality of the high school’s performing arts and music program are just as good as professional ones. You only spend a fraction of the cost, but you get to enjoy a world class performance by those of ages 14 and up. The children are the hidden treasure of the city. When building relationships with people who are different from you, even the simplest topic (such as food) can help seal a gap. As for The Moth, make sure you have a tissue box nearby. The stories presented in this inspiring podcast can move even the toughest to tears.

Who is your inspiration for your work or your passion?

Individual with disabilities, refugees and immigrants in the community are those who are my inspiration for my work. They have tirelessly demonstrated grit, resilience, endurance, and tolerance so they can build a bright future for next generations.

You Can’t Support LeBron’s New School and Be Against Charter Schools

bill

By Bill Waychunas

LeBron picked a team this summer that turned a lot of haters into fans and raised questions about what the fans are actually cheering for. I’m not talking about the Lakers or even basketball. I’m talking about schools.

There has been a lot of buzz around LeBron contributing millions to open the I Promise school in his hometown of Akron, Ohio.

And, as the kudos have rightfully rained down for LeBron’s commitment, many people have qualified their support of I Promise with the point that it is a traditional public school and NOT a charter school. It’s good for kids because he’s on our team.

So, as many raise banners to support LeBron’s school, they also raise the question, do they support the education of children, or do they support traditional public schools? What kind of fans are they anyways?

But education isn’t sports. In sports, you can have a favorite team. In sports, there are winners and losers. I would argue that societal tolerance of certain students “losing” in schools is the greatest historical and current injustice in public education. When it comes to education, we can’t have teams or sides. We should cheer for all children, families, and communities, not just if they happen to be on our team.

More frustrating is the irony of those touting I Promise as a traditional public school who don’t realize that it functions more like a charter school. Like that player on other team that you can’t stand, but secretly wish was on your team (think any player from Duke or these guys), LeBron’s school is exposing many of his supporter as hypocrites as they embrace a school which they previously would have criticized if it was a charter school.  

Let’s first acknowledge the hypocrisy around philanthropy. When charter schools accept donations, they are allowing privatizers to influence schools in an attempt to destroy public education. How is LeBron’s money different? If LeBron wasn’t a basketball player, but a Wall-Street type with ties to Akron, would his philanthropy receive the same welcome, even with the same good intentions? Not likely. We shouldn’t need to rely on celebrities to support public institutions like our schools anyways, but when money is given for the benefit of children, it shouldn’t matter what team (or type of school) is cashing the check.

The I Promise model, which is being touted as a long-awaited miracle for students, is based off the successes of urban charter schools, such as KIPP and Rocketship. These include, “longer school days, a non-traditional [longer] school year, and greater access to the school, its facilities, and its teachers” with the aim of “reducing the achievement gap between low-income students and their peers.” When charter schools do the same things, they are accused of exploiting teachers, having deficit views of children, and being overly focused on standardized testing.

I Promise fans should also acknowledge that, like charter schools, LeBron’s school is a school of choice. According to Time, “[t]he school selected area students from among those who trail their peers by a year or two in academic performance,” used a random lottery to decide who was admitted, and made phone calls to the families, asking “How would you like to be part of something different, the I Promise School.”

Let’s unpack that a bit.

Giving parents the option of “something different” implies that something isn’t working with their current public-school option, a foundational argument in favor of school choice. This also means that the kids selected would otherwise be going to neighborhood public schools. With funding being allocated on a per-pupil basis, for every student who goes to LeBron’s school, they take away a little more than $10,000 from their originally assigned school. That means less money for teachers, supplies, technology, and other supports.

The best teachers from Akron are also being extracted from the neighborhood schools. They even had to approve a separate union contract for these teachers, further implying that something isn’t working with the status-quo in the school district. If these students and teachers were leaving their traditional public schools for charter schools, it would be draining resources from neighborhood schools. But again, right player, right team. That means instead of extraction or injustice, it’s opportunity.

The selection kids by lottery may most clearly expose elements of hypocrisy for some fans who support the #WeChoose movement, which is associated with Journey for Justice Alliance and the Badass Teachers Association. They claims that charter schools are a scam and don’t offer a real choice to families, in part because the “choice” of quality schools is only available to some lottery winners, while leaving the rest behind. They advocate for well-funded schools with wrap-around services for ALL students, not just the lucky ones that won LeBron’s lottery. Clearly, the I Promise school is a step in the right direction, but it surely doesn’t serve all students or all schools. What about the students that are left behind? Clearly, one can’t claim that advancing the interest of some in LeBron’s school is progress while criticizing progress for some in charter schools is a problem.  

The bottom line is that the services and model at LeBron’s school would be good for kids, families, and communities no matter what type of school he opened. That’s what we should be focusing on, not the type of school.

If we’re going to be fans, let’s be fans for all kids, not just the ones on “our team.”

 


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